A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘united kingdom

[ISL] Four links from islands, from dividing Ireland, to the Chamorro and Haida, to the Caribbean

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  • Peter Geoghegan writes at Open Democracy about the mess that Brexit has made of Ireland, two decades after the Troubles’ end.
  • Anthrodendum’s Alex Golub notes that a North Korean attack on Guam, among other things, would threaten the Chamorro natives of the island.
  • The Toronto Star carries an excerpt from a book by Mark Dowie looking at how the Haida, of Haida Gwaii, managed to win government recognition of their existence.
  • CBC’s Sameer Chhabra explores how Canadian students at Caribbean medical schools find it very difficult to get jobs back home.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes the exobiological potential of Titamn after the detection of acrylonitrile. Cryogenic life?
  • This guest essay at Lawyers, Guns and Money on the existential problems of Brazil, with politics depending on people not institutions, is a must-read.
  • The LRB Blog considers, in the context of Brexit, what exactly might count for some as a marker of dictatorship.
  • Did the 15th century construction of the Grand Canal in China lead the Ming away from oceanic travel? Marginal Revolution speculates.
  • The NYR Daily considers</a. the disconcertingly thorough and apparently effective of Kagame's Rwanda.
  • Out There explores the reasons why the most massive planets all have the same size.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the 5th anniversary of the arrival of Curiosity on Mars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, with regards to Venezuela, the United States has no good options.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the febrile political mood of Kenya.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Putin is making the mistake of seeing the United States through the prism of Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes a proposal for British mayors to have representation at Brexit talks makes no sense.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Dangerous Minds points readers to Cindy Sherman’s Instagram account. (“_cindysherman_”, if you are interested.)
  • Language Hat takes note of a rare early 20th century Judaeo-Urdu manuscript.
  • Language Log lists some of the many, many words and phrases banned from Internet usage in China.
  • The argument made at Lawyers, Guns and Money about Trump’s many cognitive defects is frightening. How can he be president?
  • The LRB Blog notes that many traditional Labour voters, contra fears, are in fact willing to vote for non-ethnocratic policies.
  • The NYR Daily describes a book of photos with companion essays by Teju Cole that I like.
  • Of course, as Roads and Kingdom notes, there is such a thing as pho craft beer in Vietnam.
  • Peter Rukavina notes</a. the genetic history of mice in New York City and the beavers of Prince Edward Island.
  • Towleroad notes a love duet between Kele Okereke and Olly Alexander.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy seems unconvinced by the charges against Kronos programmer Marcus Hutchins.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams reports on the apparent rarity of exomoons of close-orbiting planets.
  • The collapse of the nuclear renaissance is touched on at Crooked Timber. Is it all down to renewables now?
  • Language Hat shares</a. a lovely passage taking a look at writing and memory from an ethnography of central Africa.
  • The outlawing of the Uygur language from the schools of Xinjiang was mentioned at Language Log. This is terrible.</li?
  • The anti-Semitism barely veiled in a Texas campaign against the Democratic Party, noted by Lawyers, Guns and Money, frightens me.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Sylvia Plath stayed in the United Kingdom, far from home, substantially because of the NHS.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the extent to which the economy and the wealth of the South depends on slavery.
  • Had Mexican-American relations gone only trivially differently, Noel Maurer suggests, Mexico could either have been much larger or substantially smaller.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Citizen Science Blog notes an effort to undertake a census of the monarch butterfly this week.
  • Crooked Timber’s Eric Rauchway riffs on Nolan’s Dunkirk as a meditation on the end of empire.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that, though a good idea science-wise, interstellar probes are not coming anytime soon.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog shares 13 lessons to be taken from 13 Reasons Why.
  • Language Hat investigates the deeper etymology of “Lozi”, a people of Zambia.
  • Victor Mair of Language Log takes a critical look at the difficulty of learning Chinese characters.
  • Turning to the taxi industry, Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the extent to which the gig economy undermines immigrant and minority participation in established industries.
  • The LRB Blog wonders what Brexiteers could possibly have, rightly, against the European Court of Justice. Law matters …
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is disconcerted by the extent to which some people believe falsehoods about crime and race in the US.
  • Transit Toronto notes last night’s Underground Freedom Train Ride. I’m sad I missed this.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Belarus’ concern over the import of upcoming joint military exercises with Russia, here and here.

[URBAN NOTE] Two mass transit links, from awkwardly rising London to Robert Moses in New York City

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  • In The New York Times, Michael Kimmelman reports on the Crossrail mass transit line in London. It sounds promising, even in the era of Brexit.
  • Emily Nonko at Curbed argues that the underfunding of mass transit in NYC by Robert Moses is the cause of the current crisis.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 31, 2017 at 11:59 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Charley Ross reports on an unexpected personal involvement in the disappearance of Kori Gossett. Did an informant know?
  • Citizen Science Salon reports, in the time of #sharkweek, on the sevengill sharks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article on the Chinese base in Sudan.
  • Inkfish has a fascinating article describing how New Zealand’s giant black swans went extinct, and were replaced.
  • Language Hat notes two obscure words of Senegalese French, “laptot” and “signare”. What do they mean? Go see.
  • Language Log argues that the influx of English loanwords in Chinese is remarkable. Does it signal future changes in language?
  • Lawyers, Guns Money notes how Los Angeles and southern California were, during the American Civil War, a stronghold of secessionist sentiment, and runs down some of the problems of Mexico, including the militarization of crime.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on what books by which authors tend to get stolen from British bookstores.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that Donald Trump is not likely to be able to substantially reshape NAFTA.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the recent protests in Poland against changes to the Supreme Court.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the structure of the cities of medieval Europe, which apparently were dynamic and flexible.
  • Unicorn Booty shares some classic gay board games.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is going to try to wage a repeat of the Winter War on Ukraine.