A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘united kingdom

[ISL] Four islands links: Beothuk, Newfoundland outports, seasteading, Shetlands

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  • DNA tests of Beothuk remains reveal that the extinct group was related to neither Mi’kmaq nor Inuit. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Some Newfoundland outports are seeing many young professionals move in, to make homes and businesses. CBC reports.
  • Marginal Revolution claims a group wanting to mount a seasteading effort off French Polynesia are getting close to their goals.
  • Politico.eu notes that, in the Shetlands, while fishers hope Brexit will lead to the revival of the fisheries others fear a labour shortage without EU-27 migrants.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes that the analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton from Croatia reveals much common ancestry.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno probe.
  • Crooked Timber considers the differences–such as they are–between science fiction and fantasy literature.
  • After a conversation with Adam Gopnik, Cody Delistraty makes a case for the importance of high-brow culture.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a paper arguing that Earth-like planets can exist even without active plate tectonics.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that operating systems relying on instinct hurt human thought.
  • Language Log considers Twitter post limits for East Asian languages.
  • The LRB Blog considers trench fever and the future of nursing in the United Kingdom.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study suggesting people actively look out for bad and threatening news items.
  • The NYR Daily examines the reasons why Uber ended up getting banned by the city of London.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on an exciting new staging at the Paramount Theatre of Salt-Water Moon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the very low proportion of planets in studied exosystems actually detected by Kepler.
  • Strange Company tells the story of John Banvard, a 19th century American who lost everything in mounting panorama exhibitions.
  • Towleroad reports on how PREP contributed to an 80% fall in new HIV diagnoses in London and wider England.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the worsening of HIV/AIDS in Russia, aided by terrible government policy and bad statistics.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a team of students who caught footage of the August solar eclipse from a high-altitude balloon.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that the early Moon apparently had a very thin atmosphere for tens of millions of years.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to Elon Musk’s descriptions of his space ambitions.
  • Hornet Stories notes that many on the alt-right are upset that game Wolfenstein is all about shooting Nazis.
  • The LRB Blog notes the almost ridiculous irony of Conservative Theresa May wearing a bracelet with the image of radical leftist Frida Kahlo.
  • Russell Darnley looks at efforts to get Singapore restaurants to shift away from using environmentally damaging palm oil.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the overwhelming power of the NRA in the modern United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers ways we can do SETI better by having a less Eurocentric understanding of our own history.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Uzbekistan and Kyrgzystan could solve border issues through swapping enclaves.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the corrosive effect of Bannon, and journalistic culture generally, on politics.

[URBAN NOTE] Four community links: Newfoundland politics, goldfish, Grenfell tower, water disasters

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  • Politics in a small Newfoundland community seem to literally be a family matter, of Crockers and Blakes. The National Post reports.
  • Goldfish are taking over the water systems of the Alberta city of St. Albert’s. The National Post reports.
  • This BBC feature looks at the lives of the inhabitants, survivors and not, of the 21st floor of Grenfell.
  • This Guardian feature looks at ways cities can protect themselves against disaster, especially with water.

[NEWS] Five notes about things splitting apart: Catalonia, First Nations, Brexit, NAFTA, Iceland

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  • If the separatists of Catalonia are triggering a confrontation with the Spanish government to create a majority … Open Democracy reports.
  • Speaking as someone who could be classified as a settler himself, positioning myself and my arguments is key. MacLean’s notes the importance of sensitivity to First Nations issues.
  • The United Kingdom does seem likely to get the selective access to the EU’s markets post-Brexit some want. Bloomberg reports.
  • Expensive avocado exports are but some of the complications that could hit North America if NAFTA gets changed. Bloomberg reports.
  • Iceland, again, is displaying particular caution towards potentially overwhelming Chinese investment projects. Bloomberg reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.
  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of “The Ballad of the Green Berets”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.