A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘united states

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Mississauga, Buffalo, Surrey, Helsinki

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  • CBC reports on a terrible hate crime committed against a Mississauga man.
  • The second Jollibee in the GTA, this one in Mississauga, is slated to open tomorrow. blogTO reports.
  • Making an old elementary school in Buffalo into a platform for solar panels and community activities is ingenious. Curbed reports.
  • MacLean’s reports on how a growing community of feral peacocks is complicating life for people in the British Columbia city of Surrey, here.
  • This description in Guardian Cities of the new central library in Helsinki makes this place, and Finland’s thriving library culture, sound very attractive.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her rules for life.
  • The Crux explores the development of robots that can learn from each other.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the legal and environmental reasons why commercial supersonic flight never took off.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money imagines what might have been had the F-14 Tomcat never escaped development hell.
  • Peter Watts wonders if, with de-extinction becoming possible, future generations might become even less careful with the environment, knowing they can fix things and never bothering to do so.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw argues that, with MOOCs and multiple careers in a working lifespan, autodidacticism is bound to return.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Marc Rayman looks at the final orbits of the Dawn probe over Ceres and the expected scientific returns.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the New Jersey sandwich known, alternatively, as the Taylor ham and the pork roll.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what led to the early universe having an excess of matter over antimatter.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy explores why the California Supreme Court took the trifurcation of California off referendum papers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how some in independent Azerbaijan fears that Iranian ethnic Azeris might try to subvert the independent country’s secularism.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new image showing the sheer density of events in the core of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of 2MASS 0249 c, a planet-like object that distantly orbits a pair of low-mass brown dwarfs.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of many new moons of Jupiter, bringing the total up to 79.
  • Far Outliers looks at the appeasement practiced by the Times of London in the 1930s.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas contrasts roots with anchors.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the controversy surrounding surviving honours paid to Franco in Spain.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how the question of Macedonia continues to be a threatening issue in the politics of Greece.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests the new Mexican president is trying to create a new political machine, one that can only echo the more far-reaching and unrestrained one of PRI.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at the shifting alliances of different Asian countries with China and the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the Russian reactions to a recent Politico Europe report describing Estonia’s strategies for resisting a Russian invasion in depth.

[NEWS] Links on oceans near and far: mental health, Salton Sea, Europa, Enceladus, Pluto

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  • There definitely is something to the idea that oceans, and other large bodies of water, can be healing. The immenseness of Lake Ontario (to name one body) is sublime. Global News reports on one study.
  • The scale of the disaster in California’s Salton Sea, drying up and poisoning the nearby land, is appalling. The Verge shows the scene.
  • NASA notes one mechanism for the gradual recycling of the ocean of Europa, up into its outer icy crust. Universe Today reports.
  • Some Earth bacteria could thrive in the predicted environment of Enceladus. Universe Today reports.
  • Cold environments still watery thanks to substantial amounts of brine could support life, conceivably on worlds as distant as Pluto. Universe Today reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 17, 2018 at 8:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares the latest images of asteroid Ryugu.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the equal-mass near-Earth asteroid binary 2017 YE5.
  • Far Outliers notes how corrosive fake news and propaganda can be, by looking at Orwell’s experience of the Spanish Civil War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas looks at swarms versus networks, in the light of Bauman’s thinking on freedom/security.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on how American pharmacy chain PVS fired a man–a Log Cabin Republican, no less–for calling the police on a black customer over a coupon.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper making the case that national service plays a useful role in modern countries.
  • Language Hat quotes from a beautiful Perry Anderson essay at the LRB about Proust.
  • Jeffey Herlihy-Mera writes/u> at Lingua Franca about his first-hand experiences of the multilingualism of Ecuador.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art created by the prominent members of the Romanov dynasty.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer has reposted a blog post from 2016 considering the question of just how much money the United States could extract, via military basing, from Germany and Japan and South Korea
  • Window on Eurasia suggests a new Russian language law that would marginalize non-Russian languages is provoking a renaissance of Tatar nationalism.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: Arctic, floating, cemeteries, wildlife, immigrants

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  • Wired noted how Arctic cities were facing significant problems from melting permafrost, and how they were trying to deal with this threat.
  • CityLab notes the ever-popular idea of a floating city, riding the waves.
  • Atlas Obscura notes, unsurprisingly, that some cemeteries in the United States were used as parks. Why not? These can be lovely green spaces. Just look at Toronto’s Mount Pleasant and Prospect cemeteries.
  • In a feature on Menno Schilthuizen’s Darwin Comes to Town, Simon Worrall at National Geographic looks at the many and varied ways wildlife can adapt to city life.
  • Melissa Byrnes, at Lawyers, Guns and Money, noted how Trump’s rhetoric of ICE “liberating” American communities echoed ways in which French authorities in the Algerian war militarized immigrant neighbourhoods.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen argues compellingly that stories featuring queer protagonists should also have other queer characters (among other things).
  • James Bow talks about the origins and the progress of his new novel, The Sun Runners.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the recent hopeful analysis of Ross 128b, still a strong candidate for a relatively Earth-like world.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion on having elections in the European Parliament being based on transnational lists.
  • D-Brief notes a hauntingly musical study of the plasma of Saturn’s ring system.
  • Hornet Stories reports on N.K. Jemisin’s article that bigots are not good writers of fiction. I’m inclined to agree: People who cannot imagine the lives of others as legitimate have issues with plausible characterization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Nicola Sturgeon opened Pride in Glasgow on the same day as Trump’s visit, saying there was where she wanted to be regardless.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the winding history of New York State’s Adirondacks, as a protected area.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the evidence for the unwitting involvement of Glenn Greenwald and Wikileaks as agents of Russia in support of Trump.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, considers the genesis of the phrase “Sherpas of the Beltway.” How problematic is it?
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that Canadian public opinion in support of open immigration rests on borders being controlled.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the strange behaviour of Boyajian’s Star can be explained by dust alone.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates that Russia might be on the verge of another wave of regional reorganizations, amalgamating some provinces and other territories into others.
  • Arnold Zwicky points out the achievements of Samantha Allen, a journalist writing for The Daily Beast.