A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘vancouver

[URBAN NOTE] Four notes on the Canadian struggle to land the second headquarters of Amazon

leave a comment »

  • CBC’s Pete Evans notes that Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, Halifax and Ottawa are all interested in landing Amazon’s HQ2.
  • David Rider in the Toronto Star notes that John Tory is pushing forward Toronto as home to Amazon’s HQ2, with its 50 thousand jobs.
  • Bloomberg View’s Conor Sen notes that Toronto is a strong candidate for Amazon’s HQ2, alongside cities like Atlanta and Boston.
  • Also in the Star, David Rider notes that ex-Amazon exec James Thomson is skeptical a crowded Toronto will land HQ2.
Advertisements

Written by Randy McDonald

September 11, 2017 at 9:00 pm

[NEWS] Five science and technology links: Chinese fields, Vancouver bananas, geothermal, space

leave a comment »

  • Bloomberg notes that the Chinese habit of wrapping farmers’ fields in plastic has long-term negative consequences.
  • It’s difficult not to trace the ability of a man in Vancouver to raise bananas at home to climate change. CBC reports.
  • The Caribbean island of Dominica is set to start to turn to geothermal power for its energy needs. The Inter Press Service reports.
  • Universe Today notes the astrometric data provided by GAIA lets us track stars set for close encounters.
  • The possible discovery of an intermediate-mass black hole very near the Galactic Centre is big in a lot of ways.

[URBAN NOTE] Five links on cities, from Vancouverites in Port Moody to swimming in Lake Ontario

  • I really liked this Kerry Gold article in the Globe and Mail showing how the young, priced out of Vancouver, simply went on to remake Port Moody.
  • In the Toronto Star, Edward Keenan describes how the West End Phoenix, a new model of newspaper, is set to develop.
  • Also in the Star, Scott Wheeler describes how Torontonian John Vyga ended up helping take the Berlin Wall down in 1989.
  • Steve Munro takes a look at what the metrics for TTC station cleanliness actually mean. We’re doing better than we think.
  • Shawn Micallef wonders why so few Torontonians make a habit of swimming in Lake Ontario.

[MUSIC] Moev, “Yeah, Whatever”

“Yeah, Whatever” is the title track off of Vancouver-based Canadian electronica group Moev‘s 1988 album “Yeah, Whatever”. Produced by the second incarnation of this band, featuring one Dean Russell as vocalist and lyricist, this song deserved wider recognition. Russell’s vocals and the guitar-driven lyrics bring to mind a sort of Canadian fusion of Depeche Mode with the Smiths.

Most unfortunately, Moev and Dean Russell never got the chance to break through into the mainstream, Russell dying of HIV/AIDS in 1994 and the band subsequently splintering. What could have been–But at least we have this.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 13, 2017 at 11:59 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five links about cities, from failing subways to changing neighbourhoods to borders

  • The Globe and Mail‘s Joanna Slater talks about how the subway system of New York City is staggering from catastrophe to catastrophe.
  • The Globe and Mail’s Stephen Quinn argues it is much too late to save Vancouver’s Chinatown from radical redevelopment.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Tess Kalinowski writes about how young buyers are driving a push for laneway housing in Toronto.
  • Bryan Tucker, also in the Toronto Star, also makes the case for laneway housing.
  • The National Post shares a story about an affordable 18th century house on the Québec-Vermont border.

[NEWS] Eight links from around the world

  • Yahoo News shares the story of a cat that visited every national park in the United States, with photos.
  • CBC’s Mike Crawley takes a look at the impact of the Ontario $15 minimum wage, finding it should have little effect on the economy at large.
  • In The Globe and Mail, Tony Keller suggests that Donald Trump’s actions do a great job of promoting China as a responsible superpower.
  • CBC notes research suggesting that global warming will make the heat island effect in cities much worse.
  • It is easy, editor David Shribman of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writes in The Globe and Mail, to mistake Pittsburgh for Paris.
  • The Toronto Star notes Ariana Grande’s surprise visit to her fans in hospital before tomorrow benefit concert.
  • The Atlantic reports on the problems of post-Communist gentrification in Moscow.
  • The Georgia Straight shares one Vancouver artist’s goodbye to her adopted city, beloved but now too expensive.

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto Housing Market May Need Vancouver-Style Cooling, RBC Says”

Doug Alexander and Katia Dmitrieva write for Bloomberg about the statement by the Royal Bank of Canada’s chief executive officer that Toronto’s housing market needs to be slowed down like Vancouver’s

Toronto may require measures to cool its red-hot housing market similar to moves taken in Vancouver if interest rates don’t increase, said Royal Bank of Canada Chief Executive Officer David McKay.

The head of Canada’s largest lender said Toronto housing is “running hot” and is fueled by a “concerning mix of drivers” that include lack of supply, continued low rates, rising foreign money and speculative activity. Similar circumstances in Vancouver prompted British Columbia’s government last year to impose a 15 percent tax on foreign buyers.

“In the absence of being able to use higher rates to reduce that, I do think we’re going to at some point have to consider similar measures to slow down the housing price growth,” McKay said Friday in a telephone interview.

The comments from the bank CEO come as frustration grows over the unaffordability of properties in Canada’s biggest city. The average home price in Toronto jumped 22 percent in January from the previous year, the fifth straight month of gains topping 20 percent. Listings have dropped off, down by half from last year, squeezing prices further.

The CEOs of Canada’s other big banks last year called on the government to increase housing regulation amid skyrocketing prices in Vancouver and Toronto. National Bank of Canada CEO Louis Vachon said that minimum downpayments should return to 10 percent from 5 percent, while Bank of Nova Scotia head Brian Porter suggested his company was pulling back on mortgage lending due to concern about high home prices in those two cities.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 25, 2017 at 7:15 pm