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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘venezuela

[BLOG] Five Marginal Revolution links (@margrev)

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  • Marginal Revolution features a critical if friendly review of the new Emmanuel Todd book, Lineages of Modernity.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the problems of excessive consumer activism, here.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new book looking at natural gas economics in Europe, here.
  • Marginal Revolution notes new evidence that YouTube algorithms do not tend to radicalize users, here.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the few countries where the average person was richer in 2009 than in 2019, notably Greece and Venezuela.

[NEWS] Sox tech links: Venezuela power, Argentina agriculture, AI writing, Google, Buttegieg, HIV

  • Wired reports on the daunting scale of the Venezuela power failure, and the sheer difficulty of restoring the network.
  • The Inter Press Service looks at the possibility for Argentina to enjoy improved agricultural circumstances come climate change.
  • CBC reports on how artificial intelligences can be used to create frightfully plausible fake news.
  • Axios notes the sheer density of information that Google has on its users.
  • CityLab reports on the policies hopeful presidential candidate Pete Buttegieg would bring in relating to the automation of work.
  • Wired takes a look at the second reported HIV cure and what it means.

[NEWS] Seven politics links: childcare, China in Canada, drugs, Venezuela, Brexit, Finland

  • CBC reports on childcare costs across Canada, noting how exceptionally low and affordable they are in Québec.
  • If China withdraws its students studying in Canadian universities from the country in the way Saudi Arabia did its students, the financial impact on many centres of higher education would be significant. Global News reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes how Doug Ford, surprisingly, has managed to make a mess of the nascent legal cannabis sector of retail.
  • VICE explains how Europe has largely managed to avoid a fentanyl crisis–Europe’s drug dealers have much more of a vested interest in the survival of their clients.
  • This Open Democracy essay notes how, in the light of the breakdown of Venezuela, this central alliance of China in Latin America is looking increasingly problematic.
  • This essay at Open Democracy by an anonymous anti-Brexit activist from northern England notes that, in the end, an already vulnerable North is going to have to take responsibility for the Brexit it voted for when catastrophe hits.
  • DW reports the results of Finland’s guaranteed minimum income experiment: Although well-being was improved, recipients did not increase their participation in the labour market.

[NEWS] Five politics links: Ai Weiwei on China, nuclear weapons, British navy, Venezuela oil, Iran

  • Ai Weiwei is reported as noting at NOW Toronto the role of Western governments in enabling the rise of the People’s Republic of China.
  • Business Insider argues that, in terms of numbers, technology, and strategy, the nuclear arsenal of China is the best thought-out of any of the nine nuclear weapons states.
  • SCMP notes how the naval ambitions of Britain in the Pacific make little military sense but perhaps some economic sense.
  • Foreign Policy looks at how oil, in Venezuela, did not guarantee that country’s indefinite prosperity.
  • Open Democracy hosts an article suggests that monarchism, in the form of the Shah’s son and heir Reza Pahlavi, actually has a chance of opposing the Islamic Republic.

[NEWS] Five politics links: MAGA, Ontario, Venezuela, John MacCallum, Brexit

  • Andray Domise at MacLean’s makes the obvious point that wearing a MAGA hat is a conscious choice to wear a symbol of hate.
  • The cancellation of Ontario’s guaranteed minimum income project is now up before the supreme court, which seems unconvinced that the province did not make a legal commitment three years long to provide the funding needed. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Don Pittis at CBC makes the point that the economic problems of Venezuela, much too dependent on oil, are far too severe to be overcome by the end of the Maduro regime.
  • The appointment of long-time Liberal politician John MacCallum as the ambassador of China to Canada has turned out to have been a historic mistake. CBC reports.
  • Ian Dunt at Politics.co.uk, looking at the consequences of a hard Brexit on the food supply alone, exposes what a catastrophe this would be at every level.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible roles and threats posed by artificial intelligence for interstellar missions.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber makes the point that blaming Facebook for the propagation of fake news misses entirely the motives of the people who spread these rumours, online or otherwise.
  • The Crux looks at the factors which led to the human species’ diversity of skin colours.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on a new collection of early North American electronica.
  • Far Outliers reports on the salt extraction industry of Sichuan.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how inbreeding can be a threat to endangered populations, like gorillas.
  • Language Log examines the connection of the Thai word for soul with Old Sinitic.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at divisions on the American left, including pro-Trump left radicals.
  • Caitlin Chandler at the NYR Daily reports on the plight of undocumented immigrants in Rome, forced from their squats under the pressure of the new populist government of Italy.
  • Spacing takes a look at the work of Acton Ostry Architects.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the ten largest non-planetary bodies in the solar system.
  • Strange Company looks at the very strange 1997 disappearance of Judy Smith from Philadelphia and her latest discovery in the North Carolina wilderness. What happened to her?
  • Strange Maps looks at the worrisome polarization globally between supporters and opponents of the current government in Venezuela. Is this a 1914 moment?
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russia and Venezuela share a common oil-fueled authoritarian fragility.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the camelids of Peru, stuffed toys and llamas and more.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait explains the potential discovery of an ancient rock from Earth among the Moon rocks collected by Apollo.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at what will be coming next from the New Horizons probe after its Ultima Thule flyby.
  • The Crux looks at the genetic library of threatened animals preserved cryogenically in a San Diego zoo.
  • Far Outliers looks at the drastic, even catastrophic, population changes of Sichuan over the past centuries.
  • Language Hat looks at translations made in the medieval Kingdom of Jerusalem.
  • Language Log tries to translate a possibly Indo-European sentence preserved in an ancient Chinese text.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the complexity of the crisis in Venezuela.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the Mexican-American border in this era of crisis.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a spike in unsolved shootings in Baltimore following protests against police racism.
  • Noah Smith reviews the new Tyler Cowen book, Stubborn Attachments.
  • Adam Shatz at the NYR Daily reviews what sounds like a fantastic album of anti-colonial Francophone music inspired by Frantz Fanon and assembled by French rapper Rocé.
  • The Planetary Society Blog takes a look what is next for China as it continues its program to explore the Moon.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Monique Jaques about her new photo book looking at the lives of girls growing up in Gaza.
  • Rocky Planets takes a look at how rocks can form political boundaries.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews choreographer Christopher House about his career and the next shows at the Toronto Dance Theatre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel takes a look at the seeming featurelessness of Uranus.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at a controversial swap of land proposed between Serbia and Kosovo.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the controversial possibility of China contracting Russia to divert Siberian rivers as a water supply.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the origins of Uri and Avi, a photo of apparently showing two men, one Palestinian and one Israeli, kissing.