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Posts Tagged ‘venus

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how TESS detected a star being torn apart by a distant black hole.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster looks at the past and future of the blog.
  • Crooked Timber takes on the sensitive issue of private schools in the United Kingdom.
  • The Crux considers the question of why women suffer from Alzheimer’s at a higher frequency than men.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting that saving the oceans of the Earth could reduce the effects of global warming by 20%.
  • Bruce Dorminey considers a paper suggesting that, if not for its volcanic resurfacing, Venus could have remained an Earth-like world to this day.
  • The Dragon’s Tale notes that NASA will deploy a cubesat in the proposed orbit of the Lunar Gateway station to make sure it is a workable orbit.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at Soyuz T-10a, the first crewed mission to abort on the launch pad.
  • Gizmodo reports on a paper arguing that we should intentionally contaminate Mars (and other bodies?) with our world’s microbes.
  • io9 looks at how Warner Brothers is trying to control, belatedly, the discourse around the new Joker movie.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how, in industrializing London, women kidnapped children off the streets.
  • Language Hat links to a page examining the Arabic and Islamic elements in Dune.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at a new documentary examining the life of Trump mentor Roy Cohn.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how BBC protocols are preventing full discussion of public racism.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at different efforts to reimagining the subway map of New York City.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper claiming that increased pressure on immigrants to assimilate in Italy had positive results.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the background to George Washington’s statements about the rightful place of Jews in the United States.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the political explanation of the massive increase in the planetary defense budget of NASA.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the Rocky Horror Show, with its celebration of sexuality (among other things).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers why there are so many unexpected black holes in the universe.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps examines why Google Street View is not present in Germany (and Austria).
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a ruling in a UK court that lying about a vasectomy negates a partner’s consent to sex.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the controversy about some Buryat intellectuals about giving the different dialects of their language too much importance.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Ryan Anderson at anthro{dendum} looks at the unnatural history of the beach in California, here.
  • Architectuul looks at the architectural imaginings of Iraqi Shero Bahradar, here.
  • Bad Astronomy looks at gas-rich galaxy NGC 3242.
  • James Bow announces his new novel The Night Girl, an urban fantasy set in an alternate Toronto with an author panel discussion scheduled for the Lillian H. Smith Library on the 28th.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the indirect evidence for an exomoon orbiting WASP-49b, a possible Io analogue detected through its ejected sodium.
  • Crooked Timber considers the plight of holders of foreign passports in the UK after Brexit.
  • The Crux notes that astronomers are still debating the nature of galaxy GC1052-DF2, oddly lacking in dark matter.
  • D-Brief notes how, in different scientific fields, the deaths of prominent scientists can help progress.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how NASA and the ESA are considering sample-return missions to Ceres.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the first test flights of the NASA Mercury program.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at how Japan is considering building ASAT weapons.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the first test flights of the NASA Mercury program.
  • Far Outliers looks how the anti-malarial drug quinine played a key role in allowing Europeans to survive Africa.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox considers grace and climate change.
  • io9 reports on how Jonathan Frakes had anxiety attacks over his return as Riker on Star Trek: Picard.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the threatened banana.
  • Language Log looks at the language of Hong Kong protesters.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how a new version of The Last of the Mohicans perpetuates Native American erasure.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how East Germany remains alienated.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the participant-observer effect in fMRI subjects.
  • The NYR Daily reports on a documentary looking at the India of Modi.
  • Corey S. Powell writes at Out There about Neptune.
  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the atmosphere of Venus, something almost literally oceanic in its nature.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money considers how Greenland might be incorporated into the United States.
  • Rocky Planet notes how Earth is unique down to the level of its component minerals.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog considers biopolitical conservatism in Poland and Russia.
  • Starts With a Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if LIGO has made a detection that might reveal the nonexistence of the theorized mass gap between neutron stars and black holes.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at Marchetti’s constant: People in cities, it seems, simply do not want to commute for a time longer than half an hour.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at how the US Chemical Safety Board works.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on how Muslims in the Russian Far North fare.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at cannons and canons.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares a video of the expansion of supernova remnant Cas A.
  • James Bow shares an alternate history Toronto transit map from his new novel The Night Girl.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes the Boris Johnson coup.
  • The Crux notes a flawed study claiming that some plants had a recognizable intelligence.
  • D-Brief notes the mysterious absorbers in the clouds of Venus. Are they life?
  • Dangerous Minds shares, apropos of nothing, the Jah Wabbles song “A Very British Coup.”
  • Cody Delistraty looks at bullfighting.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of stone tools sixteen thousand years old in Idaho which are evidence of the first humans in the Americas.
  • io9 features an interview with authors Charlie Jane Anders and Annalee Newitz on worldbuilding.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a bill in Thailand to establish civil unions is nearing approval.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how using plastic in road construction can reduce pollution in oceans.
  • Language Log looks to see if some police in Hong Kong are speaking Cantonese or Putonghua.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the perplexing ramblings and–generously–inaccuracy of Joe Biden.
  • The LRB Blog asks why the United Kingdom is involved in the Yemen war, with Saudi Arabia.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the different efforts aiming to map the fires of Amazonia.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on how some southern US communities, perhaps because they lack other sources of income, depend heavily on fines.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the complex literary career of Louisa May Alcott, writing for all sorts of markets.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the apparently sincere belief of Stalin, based on new documents, that in 1934 he faced a threat from the Soviet army.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at fixings, or fixins, as the case may be.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul notes the recent death of I.M. Pei.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes what, exactly, rubble-pile asteroids are.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about definitions of home.
  • Centauri Dreams considers white dwarf planets.
  • The Crux notes how ultra-processed foods are liked closely to weight gain.
  • D-Brief observes that a thin layer of insulating ice might be saving the subsurface oceans of Pluto from freezing out.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the critical role played by Apollo 10 in getting NASA ready for the Moon landings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the American government’s expectation that China will seek to set up its own global network of military bases.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the Soviet Union’s Venera 5 and 6 missions to Venus.
  • Far Outliers looks at the visit of U.S. Grant to Japan and China.
  • Gizmodo notes a recent analysis of Neanderthal teeth suggesting that they split with Homo sapiens at a date substantially earlier than commonly believed.
  • io9 notes the sheer scale of the Jonathan Hickman reboots for the X-Men comics of Marvel.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the argument of Ted Cruz that people should stop making fun of his “space pirate” suggestion.I am inclined to think Cruz more right than not, actually.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the wave of anti-black violence that hit the United States in 1919, often driven by returned veterans.
  • Language Hat shares a recognizable complaint, written in ancient Akkadian, of bad customers.
  • Language Log shares a report of a village in Brittany seeking people to decipher a mysterious etching.
  • This Scott Lemieux report at Lawyers, Guns and Money about how British conservatives received Ben Shapiro is a must-read summary.
  • Benjamin Markovits at the LRB Blog shares the reasons why he left his immigrant-heavy basketball team in Germany.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at one effort in Brazil to separate people from their street gangs.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how ISIS, deprived of its proto-state, has managed to thrive as a decentralized network.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences and perceptions of his native region of New England, in southeastern Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how the Chang’e 4 rover may have found lunar mantle on the surface of the Moon.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that while Argentine president Mauricio Macri is polling badly, his opponents are not polling well.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of things to do in see in the Peru capital of Lima.
  • The Signal examines how the Library of Congress engages in photodocumentation.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal explains how he is helping native insects by planting native plants in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how scientific illiteracy should never be seen as cool.
  • Towleroad notes the questions of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as to why Truvada costs so much in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how family structures in the North Caucasus are at once modernizing and becoming more conservative.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how the distribution of US carriers and their fleets at present does not support the idea of a planned impending war with Iran.
  • Arnold Zwicky examines the tent caterpillar of California.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the importance of complete rest.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at the contributions of ordinary people to Alzheimer’s research.
  • The Crux notes how recent planetary scientists acknowledge Venus to be an interestingly active world.
  • D-Brief notes the carnivorous potential of pandas.
  • Cody Delistraty considers a British Library exhibit about writing.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that, in red giant systems, life released from the interiors of thawed outer-system exomoons might produce detectable signatures in these worlds’ atmospheres.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares reports of some of the latest robot developments from around the world.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the concepts of gentrification and meritocracy.
  • Gizmodo notes a running dinosaur robot that indicates one route by which some dinosaurs took to flight.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox talks about bringing some principles of Wendell Berry to a town hall discussion in Sterling, Kansas.
  • io9 notes that a reboot of Hellraiser is coming from David S. Goyer.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how museums engage in the deaccessioning of items in their collections.
  • Language Log examines the Mongolian script on the renminbi bills of China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Volkswagen in the United States is making the situation of labour unions more difficult.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the effective lack of property registration in the casbah of Algiers.
  • The NYR Daily notes the Afrofuturism of artist Devan Shinoyama.
  • Strange Company examines the trial of Jane Butterfield in the 1770s for murdering the man who kept her as a mistress with poison. Did she do it? What happened to her?
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes a controversial map identifying by name the presidents of the hundred companies most closely implicated in climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian Orthodox Church, retaliating against the Ecumenical Patriarchy for its recognition of Ukrainian independence, is moving into Asian territories outside of its purview.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts a rumination by looking at the sportswear of the early 20th century world.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkable imaging of the atmosphere of HR 8799 e.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about books that, once picked up, turned out to be as good as promised.
  • The Crux considers obsidian, known in the Game of Thrones world as dragonglass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that NASA is considering a proposal for a floating Venus probe that would be recharged by microwaves from orbit.</li.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a report that Russia has developed a new satellite to work with a new anti-satellite weapons system.
  • Far Outliers notes what U.S. Grant learned from the Mexican-American War, as a strategist and as a politician.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing suggests, drawing from the image of M87*, that we have had a world disenchanted by the digital technology used to produce the image.
  • JSTOR Daily shares what critical theory has to say about the binge-watching of television.
  • Language Hat notes the Cherokee-language inscriptions on the wall of Manitou Cave.
  • Language Log considers when the first conversing automaton was built.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at a corner of 1970s feminism forgotten despite its innovative ideas.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the idea of restricting some new migrants to particular regions of the United States.
  • The NYR Daily explores the important new work by Igiaba Scego, Beyond Babylon.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers a surprisingly complex question: What is an electron?
  • Window on Eurasia explains why the cost of a professional military means Russia will not abandon the draft.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores “johnson” as a euphemism for penis.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • At Anthro{dendum}, Travis Cooper shares thoughts o what should be kept in mind in studying new media.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new plan to catalogue a hundred thousand stellar nurseries in nearby galaxies.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the very unusual lightcurve of the star VVV-WIT-07.
  • D-Brief considers the possible role of climate change in undermining Byzantium.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers managed to directly image exoplanet HR8799e, a young hot Jupiter some 130 light-years away.
  • JSTOR Daily examines the lynchings inflicted on people of Mexican background in the conquered American West after the Mexican-American War.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the possibility that homo sapiens might trace its ancestry to hominid populations in southern Africa.
  • Noahpinion features a guest post from Roy Bahat arguing that Uber and Lyft need to change their treatment of their workers for their own good.
  • The NYR Daily features an article by Zia Haider Rahman talking about the many ways in which British identity has mutated after Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog features some photos taken by the Beresheet probe on its way to the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Greg Scarnici book Dungeons & Drag Queens, a funny take on Fire Island.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the early Solar System, when a still energetic Mars existed alongside Earth as a life-supporting planet. (Venus, not so much. Perhaps?)
  • Daniel Little writes at Understanding Society about his new book project, a social ontology of government.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is dropping off sharply in importance as a trading partner for most post-Soviet states.