A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘voyager 1

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy looks at ALMA’s observations of the birth of binary star system, here.
  • The Buzz, at the Toronto Public Library, announces the Governor-General’s Literary Awards from 2019, here.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how we might be able to find a wormhole at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • The Crux commemorates the enormously successful and long-lasting Voyager missions.
  • D-Brief notes a self-tending swarm search and rescue drones.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how the first discoveries of exoplanets were a consequence of innovative technology and thinking.
  • Steve Attewell at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that he is talking about the new idea in X-Men of a mutant nation-state over at Graphic Policy Radio.
  • The LRB Blog notes Manif pour Tous mobilizing against new human reproduction laws in France.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the drug war in Mexico has been getting worse.
  • Neuroskeptic considers: What traits would a human population adapted to contemporary environmental pressures exhibit?
  • The NYR Daily looks at a new exhibition of critical Internet-related art by Meriam Bennani.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at a remarkable double gravitational lens, and what it reveals about the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that although half of working-age people in Uzbekistan have been educated in the Latin script, many remain fluent in Cyrillic.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the many implications of fried pickles with ranch dressing.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} compares different sorts of public bathing around the world, from Native America to Norden to Japan.
  • Charlie Stross at Antipope is unimpressed by the person writing the script for our timeline.
  • Architectuul reports on an architectural conference in Lisbon.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of the eruption of the Raikoke volcano in Kamchatka.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at what the Voyager spacecraft have returned about the edge of the solar system.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with the idea of bipartisanship if it means compromising on reality, allegorically.
  • The Crux counts the number of people who have died in outer space.
  • D-Brief notes that the Andromeda Galaxy has swallowed up multiple dwarf galaxies over the eons.
  • Dead Things notes the identification of the first raptor species from Southeast Asia, Siamraptor suwati.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a paper tracing the origins of interstellar comet 2/Borisov from the general area of Kruger 60.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about the privilege allowing people access to affordable dental care.
  • Gizmodo tells how Alexei Leonov survived the first spacewalk.
  • io9 looks at the remarkable new status quo for the X-Men created by Jonathan Hickman.
  • Selma Franssen at the Island Review writes about the threats facing the seabirds of the Shetlands.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at what led Richard Nixon to make so many breaks from the American consensus on China in the Cold War.
  • Language Log notes an undergraduate course at Yale using the Voynich Manuscript as an aid in the study of language.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money explains her recent experience of the socialized health care system of Israel for Americans.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how badly the Fukuyama prediction of an end to history has aged.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few maps of the new Ottawa LRT route.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper establishing a link between Chinese industries undermining their counterparts in Mexico and Mexican social ills including crime.
  • Sean Marshall reports from Ottawa about what the Confederation Line looks like.
  • Adam Shatz at the NYR Daily looks at the power of improvisation in music.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at South Williamsburg Jewish deli Gottlieb’s.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews</a the new Patti Smith book, Year of the Monkey.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking as the factors leading into transnational movements.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the question of the direction(s) in which order in the universe was generated.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a report noting the very minor flows of migration from China to Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the politics in the British riding of Keighley.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguin socks.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • {anthro}dendum reads the recent Sokal Square project as satire.
  • Architectuul takes a look at an ingenious floating school, in an artificial pond at Berlin’s Tempelhof airport.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes an in-depth look at the possibility of moons having moons. What does the lack of such worlds in our solar system, despite possible spaces for their existence, say about their presence in the wider universe?
  • Larry Klaes at Centauri Dreams takes a look at The Farthest, a recent film examining the Voyager probes.
  • The Crux looks at Georges Lemaître, the Belgian Jesuit and physicist who first imagined the Big Bang.
  • D-Brief notes that scientists have successfully created healthy mice using the genomes of two same-sex parents.
  • Gizmodo notes that new computer models of pulsars have revealed unexpected new elements of their behaviour.
  • JSTOR Daily interviews Alexander Chee, who tells about how the JSTOR database helped him write his novel The Queen of the Night.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a Ukrainian bank that offers high-interest savings accounts to people who, as measured by app, walk at least 10 thousand steps a day.
  • The NYR Daily profiles Jair Bolsonario, the likely next Brazilian president arguably because of his fondness for the military regimes of old, and what his success says about the failings of democracy in Brazil.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the impending recognition of a national Ukrainian Orthodox Church by the Ecumenical Patriarch will have global repercussions, being a victory for Ukraine and a major loss for Russia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • In a long and frighteningly compelling article, Charlie Stross at Autopope warns that a Britain that heads for a hard Brexit might be lucky only to go through the worst of the 1970s.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait explores the fact that an asteroid the size of a car burned up in the atmosphere above Greenland on the 25th of July, 2018.
  • Centauri Dreams shares an essay by Ramses Ramirez looking at efforts to redefine the classical “habitable zone” in more useful ways, keeping different planetary and stellar environments in mind.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin takes a look at the failures of a journalism relying on anonymous interview given the prospects of a hard Brexit.
  • The Crux considers how the decision of flight-controllers to direct Voyager 1 towards a close flyby of Titan closed off the possibility of that spacecraft visiting Pluto in 1986.
  • D-Brief looks at the exchange of microbes among subway passengers.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at just how codified societies of the pirates of the early modern North Atlantic could be, of necessity.
  • Language Log takes a look at why Matti, a character from the Finnish Nightmares webcomic, has become so massively popular in China.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Dan Nexon continues his analysis of American hegemony, looking at instances of past hegemonies undermined not by foreign opposition but by non-state actors and by domestic opponents.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a study suggesting the data sets collected by psychologists are actually not broadly accessible at all.
  • Francis Wade a href=”https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/08/06/ngugi-wa-thiongo-and-the-tyranny-of-language/”&gt;writes for the NYR Daily about Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, a Kenyan writer whose work–first writing in English, then shifting to Gikuyu–reflects a deep awareness of the intimate links between language and colonization, even in a post-colonial world.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There asks an important question: What is a habitable planet? Can we even speculate given how little we know?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the prospect of sending orbiters like Galileo and Cassini, to Uranus and Neptune. The technology is there, the ODINUS mission has been sketched out, and there is a tempting launch window in 2034.
  • Towleroad shares an excerpt from Omarosa Manigault’s new book on Donald Trump and his administration, talking about the cognitive decline she witnessed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia is strengthening its Interior Ministry forces opposing the Donbas republics in eastern Ukraine, ostensibly to prevent smuggling.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at some homoerotic art from Brazil with an accompanying Marilyn Frye text confusingly translated to Portuguese and back again.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the unusual exoplanet HIP 65426 b, orbiting its parent star in a very distant orbit. Why is that?
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares some photos from an evening spent at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.
  • Centauri Dreams imagines what could have been if Voyager 1 had, as some hoped, gone on to Pluto. What discoveries would have been made, decades before New Horizons by a probe with less capable instrumentation?
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at David Bowie’s mid-1970s nadir, caught up in an oddly vegetarianism-driven panic over psychic espionage.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone uses a variety of demographic, cultural, and economic markers to define the Rust Belt of the United States.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that, at one point, American funerals included swag, nice gifts to mourners like sets of gloves.
  • Language Hat notes a language of the Pakistani Himalayas, Badeshi, that turns out not to be quite completely extinct.
  • Justin Petrone, at north!, celebrates his discovery of a familiar type, an Italian coffeeshop owner, in his adopted Estonia.
  • Out There considers the remarkable potential of exploration and telescopic study at the edge of our solar system.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla notes that the Japanese Hayabusa 2 probe has detected its target, asteroid Ryugu.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on tuyo, a Filipino comfort food combining dried fish with chocolate-flavoured rice porridge.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an entertaining-sounding club meeting in Charlottetown, of Island subscribers to The New Yorker.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the new Great Magellan telescope will not have artificial spikes marring its field of vision.
  • Towleroad notes< that CNN's Don Lemon is aware of Trump's nickname for him, "Sour Lemon".
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia’s working-age population is set to decline regardless of recent demographic initiatives.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes J0045, once thought to be a star in Andromeda and but recognized as a binary black hole a thousand times further away.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the longevity of the Voyager mission.
  • D-Brief notes that some worms can thrive in a simulacrum of Mars soil.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes an ambitious effort to try to detect a transit of Proxima Centauri b. Did the researchers pick something up?
  • Hornet Stories links to a report suggesting HIV denialism is worryingly common in parts of Russia.
  • Language Log reports on an apparently oddly bilingual Chinese/Vietnamese poster. Where did it come from?
  • The LRB Blog reports on how Tunisian Anouar Brahem fused jazz with Arabic music on his new album Blue Maqems.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a lecture by John Cloud on indigenous contributions to mapmaking in Alaska.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the grim position of Theresa May in Brexit negotiations.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers what would have happened if the Americas had not been populated in 1492. How would imperialism and settlement differ?
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes some of the architectural legacies–houses, for instance–of Basque settlement in the American West.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes three conundrums that neutrinos might be able to solve.
  • Window on Eurasia notes why Russia is hostile, despite its program of merging federal units, to the idea of uniting Tatarstan with Bashkortostan.
  • Using an interwar map of Imperial Airways routes, Alex Harrowell illustrates how the construction of globalized networks can make relatively marginal areas quite central.

[NEWS] Five links: Brexit, left-wing denialism, Menshevik Georgia, immigrants in cities, Voyager

  • Prospect Magazine shares Ivan Rogers’ inside perspective on how David Cameron’s misunderstanding of the political priorities in the wider EU was (mostly) responsible for the ill-judged decision to hold a referendum on Brexit.
  • Haaretz shares Oz Katerji’s devastating criticism of many left-wing intellectuals for turning a blind eye to genocides they find politically inconvenient. (Noam Chomsky, stand up please.)
  • Eric Lee suggests that the moderate Menshevik government that ruled Georgia for a few brief years offers insight into a more humanistic way that the Russian Revolution could have taken, over at Open Democracy.
  • Irena Guidikova suggests that initiatives taken at the level of the cities are most important for the integration of immigrants, that helping them build networks and acquire social capital must be central to any project, over at Open Democracy.
  • Matt Novak at Gizmodo’s Paleofuture notes that, after substantial work, copies of the Voyager Golden Record are finally available for purchase.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams links to archival video painstakingly collected from the Voyager missions.
  • Citizen Science Salon notes ways ordinary people can use satellite imagery for archaeological purposes.
  • Good news: Asian carp can’t find a fin-hold in Lake Michigan. Bad news: The lake is so food-deprived nothing lives there. The Crux reports.
  • D-Brief notes that, once every second, a fast radio burst occurs somewhere in the universe.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the psychedelic retro-futurism of Swedish artist Kilian Eng.
  • Dead Things notes the recovery of ancient human DNA from some African sites, and what this could mean for study.
  • Cody Delistraty reconsiders the idea of the “coming of age” narrative. Does this make sense now that we have abandoned the idea of a unitary self?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the evolution of icy bodies around different post-main sequence stars.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner notes anti-Putin dissident Alexei Navalny.
  • Hornet Stories notes reports of anti-gay persecution in Azerbaijan.
  • Language Log takes a look at the dialectal variations of southern Ohio.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money starts a discussion about what effective disaster relief for Puerto Rico would look like.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the aftermath of the recent earthquake in Mexico, and the story of the buried girl who was not there.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Toronto real estate companies, in light of rent control, are switching rental units over to condos.
  • Naked Anthropologist Laura Agustín takes a look at the origins and stories of migrant sex workers.
  • The NYR Daily talks about the supposedly unthinkable idea of nuclear war in the age of Trump.
  • Drew Rowsome gives a strongly positive–and deserved review to the Minmar Gaslight show The Seat Next to the King, a Fringe triumph now playing at the Theatre Centre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how so many outer-system icy worlds have liquid water.
  • Towleroad features Jim Parsons’ exploration of how important is for him, as a gay man, to be married.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian language policy limiting minority languages in education could backfire, and wonders if Islamization one way people in an urbanizing North Caucasus are trying to remain connected to community.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes one source suggesting red dwarf stars may produce too little ultraviolet to spark life on their planets.
  • Hornet Stories notes how LGBTQ Dreamers will be hit badly by the repeal of DACA.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money approves of Frederick Crews’ critical takedown of Freud as a scientist.
  • The LRB Blog looks at a new South Korean film examining the Gwangju massacre of 1980.
  • The NYR Daily notes that China seems set to head into a new era of strict censorship, with calamitous results.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the 40th anniversary of the Voyagers in the light of the Pale Blue Dot of Carl Sagan.
  • The Signal reports that, for archivists’ purposes, online newspaper sites are actually very poorly organized.
  • At Spacing, Adam Bunch notes how Upper Canadian governor John Simcoe’s abolition of slavery was not quite that.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continued official contortions around Circassian history in Russia.

[NEWS] Four space science links, from Mars to TRAPPIST-1 to Gliese 710 to starships

  • CBC reports on recent research noting markers of hydrothermal activity in the minerals of Mars’ Gale Crater.
  • Universe Today reports on findings that ultraviolet radiation from TRAPPIST-1 is low enough to let its habitable-zone planets retain their volatiles, like water.
  • VICE notes that, in 1.3 million years, red dwarf star Gliese 710 will have a close encounter with our solar system.
  • In light of the Voyagers’ 40th, Becky Ferreira considers some of the latest proposals for crewed starship designs.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 1, 2017 at 8:30 pm