A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘war

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith updates his readers about the progress of his various writing projects.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the Battle of Mosul waged against ISIS.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of rogue binary planet 2MASS J11193254–1137466, two super-Jupiters by themselves.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the raw photography of early 20th century New York City’s Weegee.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is rightly unimpressed by the reflexive Russophilia of The Nation. Imperialism is still imperialism …
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen strongly recommends Dali, in the Chinese province of Yunnan, for tourists.
  • The NYR Daily features Masha Gessen, looking at the truth underneath the lies of Trump.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer makes a case that Macron’s use of “civilizational” to describe Africa’s issues might be the subject of over-quick outrage.
  • Peter Rukavina describes his two weeks with a Nokia N95, without a modern smartphone. There was good and bad to this.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle explains, with photos, what hoverflies are and why they are so important.
  • Understanding Society considers a fraught question: what paths to modernization were open for China in the 1930s, before the People’s Republic?
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, in 30 years, Moscow will be a megacity with a large population of (substantially immigrant) Muslim origin.

[NEWS] Four Canada links, from the innocence of Khadr to the joking alt-right to CanCon workings

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  • Sandy Garossino considers the furor over Omar Khadr. What if the 15 year old was actually not guilty of the crimes of which he was accused?
  • The Globe and Mail‘s Tabatha Southey points out, after the Proud Boys incident in Halifax, how the alt-right’s claims to be joking reveals their intent. Hannah Arendt knew these kinds of people.
  • The CBC’s Haydn Watters describes how one Ottawa couple is planning to visit in 2018 every location involved in every one of the 87 Heritage Minutes.
  • Ben Paynter at Fast Company writes about the system of funding and other support that keeps Canadian pop music thriving.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • James Bow shares his story of how he met famed Canadian kid’s author Gordon Korman.
  • Paul Drye has sales on this month for his two books, space race WI book False Steps and his first, Passing Strangeness.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes two overlooked episodes of migration in Canada, of Hawaiians in British Columbia and Canadian exiles in Australia.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner shared, again, his personal photo essay about his links to and love of Canada.
  • Language Hat looks at the potentially Australian slang phrase “good on you” (pronounced “good onya”, apparently).
  • Language Hat looks at claims that translation and grammar complicate the meaning of the text authorizing the handover of Hong Kong to China.
  • The LRB Blog announces that their #readeverywhere photo contest is up and running for July!
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares a gorgeous photo essay of her trip to Chania, on Crete.
  • Unicorn Booty has an interesting essay looking at the barriers to membership imposed by gay culture on newly-out members of the community.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the cost of the Russian war in Ukraine and argues that the consequences of a crash now would be worse than in 1998.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Language Log argues that, despite a lack of official or public support, Cantonese remains the dominant language of Hong Kong.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the case for the global relevance of the Cranberries’ song “Zombie.”
  • Marginal Revolution seems to like the end results of Canada’s immigration system.
  • The NYR Daily notes that, even after ISIS, Iraq will be beset by multiple ethnoreligious crises.
  • Out There’s Corey S. Powell interviews an astronomer about the very strange Przybylski’s Star, rich in rare radioactive elements.
  • Savage Minds considers the decolonization of anthropology in the context of Iraq.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the surprisingly deep historical resonance of the loon in Canada.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the complex prebiotic chemistry in the system of young triple IRAS 16293-2422.
  • Language Hat looks at the central role played by Kyrgzystan writer Chinghiz Aitmatov in shaping Kyrgyz identity.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Baltimore’s new transit map.
  • Steve Munro examines the Ford family’s various issues with TTC streetcars.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog reports on the latest UN report on the Donbas and the conflict there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the number of ethnic Russians in the former Soviet Union has fallen sharply through demographic change including assimilation.

[ISL] Three notes about islands and the humans who try to save them, destroy them, or just stand by

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes that the old HMV store in the Dufferin Mall is now a fidget spinner store. This has gone viral.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her week in Paris.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one paper examining the complex formation of the dense TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Far Outliers reports from early 20th century Albania, about how tribal and language and ethnic identities overlap, and not.
  • Language Log notes efforts to promote Cantonese in the face of Mandarin.
  • The LRB Blog wonders if May’s electoral defeat might lead to the United Kingdom changing its Brexit trajectory.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that cars have more complex computer programming these days than fighter jets.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the counter-cyclical Brazilian fiscal cap still makes no sense.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is edging towards an acknowledgement of its involvement in the Ukrainian war.