A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘west africa

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that Betelgeuse is very likely not on the verge of a supernova, here.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the mapping of asteroid Bennu.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber reposted, after the election, a 2013 essay looking at the changes in British society from the 1970s on.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about the Precambrian Earth, here.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about fear in the context of natural disasters, here.
  • Far Outliers reports on the problems of privateers versus regular naval units.
  • Gizmodo looks at galaxy MAMBO-9, which formed a billion years after the Big Bang.
  • io9 writes about the alternate history space race show For All Mankind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the posters used in Ghana in the 1980s to help promote Hollywood movies.
  • Language Hat links to a new book that examines obscenity and gender in 1920s Britain.
  • Language Log looks at the terms used for the national language in Xinjiang.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with Jeff Jacoby’s lack of sympathy towards people who suffer from growing inequality.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that urbanists should have an appreciation for Robert Moses.
  • Sean Marshall writes, with photos, about his experiences riding a new Bolton bus.
  • Caryl Philips at the NYR Daily writes about Rachmanism, a term wrongly applied to the idea of avaricious landlords like Peter Rachman, an immigrant who was a victim of the Profumo scandal.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking at the experience of aging among people without families.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the empty space in an atom can never be removed.
  • Strange Maps shares a festive map of London, a reindeer, biked by a cyclist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Mongolia twice tried to become a Soviet republic.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers different birds with names starting with x.

[BLOG] Five Marginal Revolution links

  • Marginal Revolution considers if the CFA franc system is dying out, here.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a link to a paper quantifying the effects of the old boys club, here.
  • Marginal Revolution contrasts and compares the old NAFTA and the new USMCA, here.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how Germany has access to nuclear weapons, here.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the high rate of consainguineous marriage in Saudi Arabia, here.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Crux looks at the australopiths, not-so-distant ancestors of modern humans.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the interest of NASA in exploring the lunar subsurface, including lava tubes.
  • Far Outliers looks at the politicking of mid-19th century European explorers in the Sahel.
  • io9 notes that the new Joker film is getting stellar reviews, aided by the performance of Joaquin Phoenix.
  • JSTOR Daily explores how, to meet censors’ demands, Betty Boop was remade in the 1930s from sex symbol into housewife.
  • Language Log reports on an utter failure in bilingual Irish/English signage.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money shows that a history of slavery in the US (Canada too, I would add) must not neglect the enslavement of indigenous peoples.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper studying San Francisco looking at how rent control did not work.
  • The NYR Daily considers growing protest against air travel for its impact on global climate.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the queer romance film Bathroom Stalls & Parking Lots.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the influence of Russia in the former Soviet Union is undone by Russian imperialism.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the striking imagery–originally religious–of “carnal weapons”.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares images of Jupiter, imaged in infrared by ALMA.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at ocean upwelling on one class of super-habitable exoplanet.
  • D-Brief looks at how the Komodo dragon survived the threat of extinction.
  • Far Outliers reports on a mid-19th century slave raid in the Sahel.
  • Gizmodo notes that the secret US Air Force spaceplane, the X-37B, has spent two years in orbit. (Doing what?)
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the economic underpinnings of medieval convents.
  • Dave Brockington writes at Lawyers, Guns and Money about the continuing meltdown of the British political system in the era of Brexit, perhaps even of British democracy.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the impact of Brexit on the Common Travel Area.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on how Poland has tried to deter emigration by removing income taxes on young workers.
  • Carole Naggar writes at the NYR Daily about the photography of women photographers working for LIFE, sharing examples of their work.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why time has to be a dimension of the universe, alongside the three of space.
  • Frank Jacobs of Strange Maps shares NASA images of the forest fires of Amazonia.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that many Russophones of Ukraine are actually strongly opposed to Russia, contrary Russian stereotypes of language determining politics.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait reports on the fragility of asteroid Ryugu.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the JUICE probe, planned to explore the three icy moons of Jupiter.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber reports on the fact that Jimmy Carter was warned in the 1970s about the possibility of global warming.
  • D-Brief notes that the Earth might not be the best world for life, that watery worlds with dense atmospheres and long days might be better.
  • Jessica Poling at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about the construction of gender.
  • Far Outliers looks at the Nigerian city of Agadez, at one point a sort of port city of the Sahel.
  • Gizmodo asks a variety of experts their opinion on which species is likely to be next in developing our sort of intelligence. (Primates come up frequently, though I like the suggestion of bacterial colonies.)
  • JSTOR Daily looks/a> at the genderless Quaker prophet Publick Universal Friend.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comments on the interview of Amy Wax with The New Yorker.
  • Marginal Revolution shares the enthusiasm of Tyler Cowen for Warsaw and Poland.
  • Peter Pomerantsev writes at the NYR Daily about how the alt-right has taken to culture-jamming.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the exceptional power of cosmic rays.
  • Window on Eurasia shares the lament of a Chuvash writer about the decline of her people’s language.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the extreme millisecond pulsar IGR J17062−6143.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at a proposal to intercept objects of extrasolar origin like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux looks at how researchers are discovering traces of lost hominid populations in the DNA of contemporary humans.
  • D-Brief notes a crowdsourcing of a search for intermediate-mass black holes.
  • Gizmodo notes the impending production of a new working Commodore 64 clone.
  • The Island Review notes people of the Norway island of Sommarøy wish to make their island, home to the midnight sun, a #TimeFreeZone.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the art that has been produced in the era of digital addiction.
  • Language Log looks at how, in Iran, the word “Eastoxification” has entered into usage alongside the older “Westoxification.”
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money looks at the many likely failings of a Corbyn foreign policy for the United Kingdom.
  • The LRB Blog notes that opposition candidate Ekrem İmamoğlu has been re-elected as mayor of Istanbul.
  • The Map Room Blog links to various maps of the Moon.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper looking at markets in Lagos, suggesting they are self-regulating to some degree.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains when the earliest sunrise and latest sunset of the year is, and why.
  • Towleroad shares an interview with Jack Baker and Mike McConnell, a same-sex couple married for nearly a half-century.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the open approach of the Russian Federation to Russian diasporids is not extended to diasporas of its minority groups, particularly to Muslim ones like Circassians and Tatars.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some Pride fashion, with and without rainbows.

[AH] Seven #alternatehistory r/imaginarymaps maps: Vinland, Mali, Korea, Poland, Balkans …

  • This r/imaginarymaps map traces a slow diffusion of Christianity westwards from a Vinland colony.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a transatlantic empire based in Africa, with the late 15th century Mali Empire extending its rule to Brazil and elsewhere.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a Joseon Korea that becomes the seat of a transpacific empire.
  • What if, this r/imaginarymaps map imagines, instead of turning east to Lithuania Poland turned west towards Czechia?
  • What if, this r/imaginarymaps map imagines, the Balkans retained a substantially larger Muslim population?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a Greater Denmark, expanding east and south.
  • Could Scotland ever have become, as this r/imaginarymaps map imagines, a maritime mercantile power?