A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘windsor

[CAT] Five #caturday links: strays, Winnipeg, scent, Instagram, paper

  • This letter to the Windsor Star makes the point that city needs to tend to its stray cats. (So do all cities, I bet.)
  • A cat café in Winnipeg has reopened. CBC reports.
  • Phys.org reports on a paper noting that the scent of male cats is made by microbes inhabiting cat bodies.
  • Apparently Instagram accounts of fat cats on diets are a thing. The Guardian reports.
  • Why do cats so love cardboard and paper? MNN reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 14, 2019 at 1:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Windsor, Calgary, Mulhouse, Naples, Dhaka

  • This Shane Mitchell op-ed at Spacing warns about how plans for a new hospital in Windsor can threaten to promote sprawl.
  • Debates over bike traffic laws are ongoing in Calgary. Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how the downtown of the French city of Mulhouse has been successfully regenerated.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how the infamous housing estate of Scampia outside of Naples, famously derelict and a nexus for crime, is finally being torn down.
  • Atlas Obscura notes an Armenian church in Dhaka, last remnant of a once-vast Armenian trading diaspora that extended out to Bengal.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: advertising, fluidity in art, George Quaintance, Francophones, RuPaul

  • The Conversation looks at the question of how to increase the representation of same-sex couples in ads.
  • Them looks at how queer artists are representing their fluidity.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the art of George Quaintance.
  • CBC Windsor reports on why some non-binary people Francophones in Windsor-Essex avoid treatment in the French language.
  • RuPaul’s Drag Race turns out to be playing a key role in keeping many gay bars in New York City thriving, Punchdrink reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Detroit and Windsor, Africville, New York City, Calgary, Shenzhen

  • The TVO show The Life-Sized City is spotlighting the revival of the binational conurbation of Detroit and Windsor. The Windsor Star reports.
  • Owners of a house that is a rare survival of Africville, currently in Lower Sackville, are seeking heritage status for this building. CBC reports.
  • VICE reports on how New York City is preparing for the L train shutdown.
  • Students seeking to set up Gay-Straight Alliances in Calgary Catholic schools are reportedly being hindered, even harassed, by hostile administrators despite provincial policy. Global News reports.
  • This SCMP article suggests Shenzhen is a popular destination for daytrippers from Hong Kong, for people who seek a Hong Kong experience at affordable prices.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Kitchener-Waterloo, London & Windsor, Montréal, Québec City

  • The economy of Hamilton, Ontario, is apparently among the strongest of any Canadian city. Global News reports.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the Ion, the Kitchener-Waterloo LRT, will be doing a test run tomorrow.
  • Southwestern Ontario, from London to Windsor, faces a potential cancellation of the proposed high-speed rail link connecting this region to Toronto. Global News reports.
  • This pair of residential towers proposed for the Quartier des spectacles in Montréal would certainly be eye-catching, if they were ever allowed to be built. CBC reports.
  • CityLab notes the controversy, and the origins, of the proposed Québec City skyscraper Le Phare, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Windsor, Québec City, Calgary, Tokyo, Tijuana

  • Low-lying Windsor, Ontario, faces the prospect of serious flooding that might be alleviated if old features of the natural landscape like trees and wetlands were restored. CBC reports.
  • Robert Vandewinkel at Huffington Post Québec makes an argument for a subway system for Québec City.
  • Jason Markusoff at MacLean’s, noting the referendum vote in Calgary against hosting the 2026 Olympics, suggests this vote can be best sign as a sign of this city’s maturity and confidence, that Calgary does not need the Olympics to be successful.
  • The Diplomat notes how costs for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics have ballooned, despite promises of an affordable Olympics.
  • VICE notes the plight of the Central American refugees gathering at Tijuana, unlikely to gain asylum in the United States.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Markham, Hamilton, London, Detroit and Windsor, Vancouver

  • Toronto Life takes a look at the new Aaniin community centre in Markham.
  • The Tower, an anarchist centre in Hamilton, got vandalized in turn after a spate of pointless anarchist vandalism on Locke Street. CBC reports.
  • Will the city of London get plugged into a high-speed rail route? One only hopes, and in the interim, one plans. Global News reports.
  • Making the border crossing between Detroit and Windsor a model for Ireland post-Brexit is a terrible idea. CBC reports.
  • Can Vancouver help solve the problem of housing for the young, including students, by having them rent rooms from compatible older folks? Global News examines the proposal.

[LINK] “New Windsor-Detroit bridge may cost $3.5B more due to low loonie”

The Toronto Star carries a Canadian Press article suggesting that the weakening dollar means a new bridge between Detroit and Windsor will cost substantially more than initially estimated.

The federal Liberal government will need to find $3.5 billion more to pay for a new bridge at the bustling border crossing between Canada and the United States.

Documents show Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been warned that the cost of building the new Windsor-Detroit bridge has likely gone up by at least $2 billion, thanks to the declining value of the Canadian dollar.

Government officials told Trudeau the project would also need an extra $1.5 billion in a contingency fund to bear the shock of any interest-rate increases should the loonie decline further against its American counterpart.

The government’s long-term fiscal framework has the price of the bridge, to be named after hockey legend Gordie Howe, pegged at $4.8 billion.

The details are laid out in a secret briefing note to Trudeau obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 5, 2016 at 4:22 pm

[URBAN NOTE] On how the GM smokestack was demolished in Windsor

Postmedia News’ Chris Thompson describes what happened when GM decided to bring down a smokestack in Windsor without notifying anyone, including the city.

Windsor officials are promising a thorough investigation and possible bylaw violation charges after the GM smokestack came down unannounced with a loud thud Tuesday afternoon.

Emergency crews were called to the former GM transmission plant between Kildare and Walker roads shortly after 3 p.m. when a crew with Jones Group Inc. completed the demolition, which had failed three times on Aug. 10.

“They did not give us the required notice,” said City of Windsor chief building official John Revell.

“So it was done without any public notice. They didn’t notify the city, it’s … I don’t know what to say about it, other than we are doing an investigation. And more information will be forthcoming.”

A woman who answered the phone at Jones Group who would only identify herself as Tracy said the company would have a statement about the demolition sometime on Wednesday.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 4, 2015 at 7:25 pm

[NEWS] Some Monday links

  • Al Jazeera warns about the militarization of the Ukrainian state, notes the alienation of Turkish Kurds from their goverment and wonders if northern Syria will become a Turkish protectorate, wishes Arab authors could travel to the United States more readily, wonders about the impact of immigrants on Catalonian separatism, and notes Wheaton College’s issue with new federal healthcare regulations.
  • Bloomberg observes the shrinkage of the American labour force, the success of the coffee crop in Vietnam, the emigration from ethnic Czechs from Ukraine to the Czech Republic, the successful retention of industry in Singapore, observes the debilitating toll of illegal fisheries off of the West African coast, and notes the call for an investigation into the treatment of the United States’ first Ebola victim.
  • Bloomberg View notes that Uber can succeed only in the context of a struggling labour market, looks at the economic issues of European petrostates, notes how political concerns override fears for the Russian economy, argues British cities also need autonomy, and via Faroese fish exports notes that sanctions may not have that much effort.
  • CBC notes Tanya Tagaq’s stalking by a sexually aggressive man in Winnipeg, and notes that Windsor is using cayenne peppers to deter squirrels from attacking the city’s tulips. (That last should work.)
  • The Inter Press Service notes the scale of Samoan emigration, observes the negative consequences of climate change for livestock farmers in the Caribbean, looks at the drought besetting Sao Paulo, looks at an economically questionable train line in Sri Lanka, considers how the Karabakh issue makes Armenian entry into the Eurasian Union problematic, and u>observes anti-Palestinian discrimination in housing in the Jerusalem area.
  • IWPR reports on growing Ukraine-related ethnic tensions in Kazakhstan and observes Georgia’s clampdown on immigration.
  • Open Democracy recommends a consistent policy of European Union opening to the western Balkans, notes the plight of Copts in Egypt, looks at ethnic tensions in North Ossetia between Ossetians and Ingush, examines Basque and Corsican separatisms, fears for the future of secularism in Mali and Senegal, and considers the dire demographics of Ukraine.