A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘wine

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Abell 30, a star that has been reborn in the long process of dying.
  • Centauri Dreams uses the impending launch of LightSail 2 to discuss solar sails in science fiction.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber, as part of a series of the fragility of globalization, considers if migration flows can be reversed. (He concludes it unlikely.)
  • The Crux considers if the record rain in the Midwest (Ontario, too, I would add) is a consequence of climate change.
  • D-Brief notes that the failure of people around the world to eat enough fruits and vegetables may be responsible for millions of premature dead.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to gender-bending Italian music superstar Renato Zero.
  • Dead Things notes how genetic examinations have revealed the antiquity of many grapevines still used for wine.
  • Gizmodo notes that the ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa may contain simple salt.
  • io9 tries to determine the nature of the many twisted timelines of the X-Men movie universe of Fox.
  • JSTOR Daily observes that the Stonewall Riots were hardly the beginning of the gay rights movement in the US.
  • Language Log looks at the mixed scripts on a bookstore sign in Beijing.
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money argues that Jeremy Corbyn has a very strong hold on his loyal followers, perhaps even to the point of irrationality.
  • Marginal Revolution observes that people who create public genetic profiles for themselves also undo privacy for their entire biological family.
  • Sean Marshall at Marshall’s Musings shares a photo of a very high-numbered street address, 986039 Oxford-Perth Road in Punkeydoodle’s Corners.
  • The NYR Daily examines the origins of the wealth of Lehman Brothers in the exploitation of slavery.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a panorama-style photo of the Apollo 11 Little West Crater on the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that classic documentary Paris Is Burning has gotten a makeover and is now playing at TIFF.
  • Peter Rukavina, writing from a trip to Halifax, notes the convenience of the Eduroam procedures allowing users of one Maritime university computer network to log onto another member university’s network.
  • Dylan Reid at Spacing considers how municipal self-government might be best embedded in the constitution of Canada.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle pays tribute to the wildflower Speedwell, a name he remembers from Watership Down.
  • Strange Maps shares a crowdsourced map depicting which areas of Europe are best (and worst) for hitchhikers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the distribution of native speakers of Russian, with Israel emerging as more Russophone than some post-Soviet states.

[NEWS] Five @badastronomer links: Moon, Saturn, AS 209, M2, WINE

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait highlights Hawke crater, located inside the larger Grotrian crater on the far side of the Moon.
  • Bad Astronomy shares a photo taken by Hubble of the auroras of Saturn.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on AS 209, a very young star with a planet less massive than Saturn that must have formed in a very short period of time.
  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkable density of stars in globular cluster Messier 2.
  • Bad Astronomy looks at the exciting proposal for the steam-fueled robot probe WINE.

Written by Randy McDonald

April 13, 2019 at 8:30 pm

[NEWS] Five language links: Cantonese, Arabic, Gaelic, French, Sumerian

  • The Cantonese language, the SCMP reports, is falling out of use among young people in Guangzhou.
  • The Muslim Hui, living outside of Xinjiang, are being pressured to shut down Arabic-medium schools. The SCMP reports.
  • The Scottish government has received only two complaints about Gaelic on bilingual road signs in the past seventeen years. The National reports.
  • HuffPost Qu├ębec notes that the French language has been displaced as the chief language of wine by English.
  • Advanced artificial intelligence has the potential to aid in the translation of ancient languages like Sumerian, with stockpiles of untranslated material just waiting for an eye’s attention. The BBC explains.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at stellar nursery NGC 604 in the Triangulum Galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams considers what the rings of Saturn indicate about the inner structure, and formation, of Saturn.
  • The Crux looks at the exciting steam-based robot WINE, capable of travelling between asteroids and hopping around larger worlds like Ceres and Europa with steam.
  • D-Brief looks at how the colours of the ocean will change over time, some parts becoming bluer and others greener as phytoplankton populations change.
  • Gizmodo deals critically with the idea that “permatripping” on LSD is possible. At most, the drug might expose underlying issues.
  • Imageo notes that, even with the polar vortex, cold snaps in North America under global warming have been becoming less cold over time.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Cutex, in the early 1910s, created a new market for manicures.
  • Language Hat mourns linguist, and fluent speaker of Sumerian, Miguel Civil.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how there is not a centre in American politics to be exploited by the likes of Howard Schultz, that if anything there is an unrepresented left.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a commenter’s argument–misguided, I think–that a wealth tax would represent a violation of privacy rights.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog notes that the InSight probe on Mars has placed the Wind and Thermal Shield above its seismometer.
  • At Une heure de peine …, Denis Colombi takes issue with the use of statistics without a deeper understanding as to what they represent.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, while a report that Belarus is investigating the possibility of autocephaly for its national church on the Ukrainian model is likely fake news, it may reflect underlying trends.
  • Arnold Zwicky points readers towards the enjoyable music of Americana/folk duo Mandolin Orange.

[NEWS] Five space links: Mars, Titan, Kepler-107, Eta Carinae, SDSS J1206+4332

  • Smithsonian Magazine notes that the country of Georgia has embarked on research to try to find a grape vine capable of surviving and producing wine in the Martian environment.
  • The dense nitrogen-methane atmosphere of Titan may be a process of the hot core’s impact on Titan’s organic compounds. Science News reports.
  • Space notes how the odd densities of two of the planets in the Kepler-107 system may indicate some massive impact on the past.
  • Universe Today notes that a dust cloud obscuring the brilliant Eta Carinae is moving away from our field of view, making Eta Carinae brighter and easier to study.
  • Universe Today notes that double quasars like SDSS J1206+4332 can help reveal the speed of the expansion of the universe.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 5, 2019 at 10:02 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes Apep, a brilliant trinary eight thousand light-years away with at least one Wolf-Rayet star that might explode in a gamma-ray burst.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that AAVSO, the American Association of Variable Star Observers, has created a public exoplanet archive.
  • The Crux considers/u> different strategies for intercepting asteroids bound to impact with Earth.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a solar twin, a star that might have been born in the same nursery as our sun, HD 186302 184 light-years away.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that although NASA’s Gateway station to support lunar traffic is facing criticism, Russia and China are planning to build similar outposts.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the research of Katie Sutton into the pioneering gender-rights movement of Weimar Germany.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrates the successful clean-up of the Cuyahoga River in Ohio, once famously depicted on fire.
  • The Map Room Blog links to maps showing Apple Maps and Google Maps will be recording images next for their online databases.
  • Jamieson Webster at the NYR Daily takes a critical, even defensible, look at the widespread use of psychopharmacological drugs in contemporary society.
  • Roads and Kingdoms carries a transcript of an interview with chefs in Ireland, considering the culinary possibilities overlooked and otherwise of the island’s natural bounty.
  • Rocky Planet considers the real, overlooked, possibility of earthquakes in the relatively geologically stable east of the United States.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes how, in the transatlantic wine trade, American interest in European wines is surely not reciprocated.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how Einsteinian relativity, specifically relating to gravitational lensing, was used to predict the reappearance of the distant Refsdal Supernova one year after its 2014 appearance.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the measured rate of the expansion of the universe depends on the method used to track this rate, and that this is a problem.
  • On Sunday, Caitlin Kelly celebrated receiving her annual cheque from Canada’s Public Lending Program, which gives authors royalties based on how often their book has been borrowed in our public libraries.
  • In The Buzz, the Toronto Public Library identified five books in its collection particularly prone to be challenged by would-be censors.
  • D-Brief suggests that, if bacteria managed to survive and adapt in the Atacama desert as it became hostile to life, like life might have done the same on Mars.
  • Far Outliers notes the crushing defeat, and extensive looting of, the MOghul empire by the Persia of Nader Shah.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the medal hauls of out Olympic athletes this year in Pyeongchang.
  • Imageo notes satellite imagery indicating that fisheries occupy four times the footprint of agriculture. Aquaculture is starting to look like a necessary idea, I think.

  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox praises Porch Fires, a new biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser, for its insights on Wilder and on the moment of the settlement of the American West.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, in the 19th century after the development of anesthesia, the ability to relieve people of pain was a political controversy. Shouldn’t it be felt, wasn’t it natural?
  • Language Hat links to an article taking a look behind the scenes at the Oxford English Dictionary. How does it work? What are its challenges?
  • At Lingua Franca, Roger Shuy distinguishes between different kinds of speech events and explains why they are so important in the context of bribery trials.
  • The LRB Blog shares some advice on ethics in statecraft from the 2nd century CE Chinese writer Liu An.
  • J. Hoberman at the NYR Daily reviews an exhibit of the work of Bauhaus artist Jozef Albers at the Guggenheim.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares an anecdote of travellers drinking homemade wine in Montenegro.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Native American drag queen and up-and-coming music star Vizin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how star S0-2, orbiting so close to the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy, will help prove Einsteinian relativity.
  • Vintage Space explains, for the record, how rockets can work in a vacuum. (This did baffle some people this time last century.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, on its 100th anniversary, Estonia has succeeded in integrating most of its Russophones.