A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘wine

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Abell 30, a star that has been reborn in the long process of dying.
  • Centauri Dreams uses the impending launch of LightSail 2 to discuss solar sails in science fiction.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber, as part of a series of the fragility of globalization, considers if migration flows can be reversed. (He concludes it unlikely.)
  • The Crux considers if the record rain in the Midwest (Ontario, too, I would add) is a consequence of climate change.
  • D-Brief notes that the failure of people around the world to eat enough fruits and vegetables may be responsible for millions of premature dead.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to gender-bending Italian music superstar Renato Zero.
  • Dead Things notes how genetic examinations have revealed the antiquity of many grapevines still used for wine.
  • Gizmodo notes that the ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa may contain simple salt.
  • io9 tries to determine the nature of the many twisted timelines of the X-Men movie universe of Fox.
  • JSTOR Daily observes that the Stonewall Riots were hardly the beginning of the gay rights movement in the US.
  • Language Log looks at the mixed scripts on a bookstore sign in Beijing.
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money argues that Jeremy Corbyn has a very strong hold on his loyal followers, perhaps even to the point of irrationality.
  • Marginal Revolution observes that people who create public genetic profiles for themselves also undo privacy for their entire biological family.
  • Sean Marshall at Marshall’s Musings shares a photo of a very high-numbered street address, 986039 Oxford-Perth Road in Punkeydoodle’s Corners.
  • The NYR Daily examines the origins of the wealth of Lehman Brothers in the exploitation of slavery.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a panorama-style photo of the Apollo 11 Little West Crater on the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that classic documentary Paris Is Burning has gotten a makeover and is now playing at TIFF.
  • Peter Rukavina, writing from a trip to Halifax, notes the convenience of the Eduroam procedures allowing users of one Maritime university computer network to log onto another member university’s network.
  • Dylan Reid at Spacing considers how municipal self-government might be best embedded in the constitution of Canada.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle pays tribute to the wildflower Speedwell, a name he remembers from Watership Down.
  • Strange Maps shares a crowdsourced map depicting which areas of Europe are best (and worst) for hitchhikers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the distribution of native speakers of Russian, with Israel emerging as more Russophone than some post-Soviet states.

[NEWS] Five @badastronomer links: Moon, Saturn, AS 209, M2, WINE

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait highlights Hawke crater, located inside the larger Grotrian crater on the far side of the Moon.
  • Bad Astronomy shares a photo taken by Hubble of the auroras of Saturn.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on AS 209, a very young star with a planet less massive than Saturn that must have formed in a very short period of time.
  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkable density of stars in globular cluster Messier 2.
  • Bad Astronomy looks at the exciting proposal for the steam-fueled robot probe WINE.

Written by Randy McDonald

April 13, 2019 at 8:30 pm

[NEWS] Five language links: Cantonese, Arabic, Gaelic, French, Sumerian

  • The Cantonese language, the SCMP reports, is falling out of use among young people in Guangzhou.
  • The Muslim Hui, living outside of Xinjiang, are being pressured to shut down Arabic-medium schools. The SCMP reports.
  • The Scottish government has received only two complaints about Gaelic on bilingual road signs in the past seventeen years. The National reports.
  • HuffPost Qu├ębec notes that the French language has been displaced as the chief language of wine by English.
  • Advanced artificial intelligence has the potential to aid in the translation of ancient languages like Sumerian, with stockpiles of untranslated material just waiting for an eye’s attention. The BBC explains.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at stellar nursery NGC 604 in the Triangulum Galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams considers what the rings of Saturn indicate about the inner structure, and formation, of Saturn.
  • The Crux looks at the exciting steam-based robot WINE, capable of travelling between asteroids and hopping around larger worlds like Ceres and Europa with steam.
  • D-Brief looks at how the colours of the ocean will change over time, some parts becoming bluer and others greener as phytoplankton populations change.
  • Gizmodo deals critically with the idea that “permatripping” on LSD is possible. At most, the drug might expose underlying issues.
  • Imageo notes that, even with the polar vortex, cold snaps in North America under global warming have been becoming less cold over time.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Cutex, in the early 1910s, created a new market for manicures.
  • Language Hat mourns linguist, and fluent speaker of Sumerian, Miguel Civil.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how there is not a centre in American politics to be exploited by the likes of Howard Schultz, that if anything there is an unrepresented left.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a commenter’s argument–misguided, I think–that a wealth tax would represent a violation of privacy rights.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog notes that the InSight probe on Mars has placed the Wind and Thermal Shield above its seismometer.
  • At Une heure de peine …, Denis Colombi takes issue with the use of statistics without a deeper understanding as to what they represent.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, while a report that Belarus is investigating the possibility of autocephaly for its national church on the Ukrainian model is likely fake news, it may reflect underlying trends.
  • Arnold Zwicky points readers towards the enjoyable music of Americana/folk duo Mandolin Orange.

[NEWS] Five space links: Mars, Titan, Kepler-107, Eta Carinae, SDSS J1206+4332

  • Smithsonian Magazine notes that the country of Georgia has embarked on research to try to find a grape vine capable of surviving and producing wine in the Martian environment.
  • The dense nitrogen-methane atmosphere of Titan may be a process of the hot core’s impact on Titan’s organic compounds. Science News reports.
  • Space notes how the odd densities of two of the planets in the Kepler-107 system may indicate some massive impact on the past.
  • Universe Today notes that a dust cloud obscuring the brilliant Eta Carinae is moving away from our field of view, making Eta Carinae brighter and easier to study.
  • Universe Today notes that double quasars like SDSS J1206+4332 can help reveal the speed of the expansion of the universe.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 5, 2019 at 10:02 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes Apep, a brilliant trinary eight thousand light-years away with at least one Wolf-Rayet star that might explode in a gamma-ray burst.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that AAVSO, the American Association of Variable Star Observers, has created a public exoplanet archive.
  • The Crux considers/u> different strategies for intercepting asteroids bound to impact with Earth.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a solar twin, a star that might have been born in the same nursery as our sun, HD 186302 184 light-years away.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that although NASA’s Gateway station to support lunar traffic is facing criticism, Russia and China are planning to build similar outposts.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the research of Katie Sutton into the pioneering gender-rights movement of Weimar Germany.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrates the successful clean-up of the Cuyahoga River in Ohio, once famously depicted on fire.
  • The Map Room Blog links to maps showing Apple Maps and Google Maps will be recording images next for their online databases.
  • Jamieson Webster at the NYR Daily takes a critical, even defensible, look at the widespread use of psychopharmacological drugs in contemporary society.
  • Roads and Kingdoms carries a transcript of an interview with chefs in Ireland, considering the culinary possibilities overlooked and otherwise of the island’s natural bounty.
  • Rocky Planet considers the real, overlooked, possibility of earthquakes in the relatively geologically stable east of the United States.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes how, in the transatlantic wine trade, American interest in European wines is surely not reciprocated.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how Einsteinian relativity, specifically relating to gravitational lensing, was used to predict the reappearance of the distant Refsdal Supernova one year after its 2014 appearance.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the measured rate of the expansion of the universe depends on the method used to track this rate, and that this is a problem.
  • On Sunday, Caitlin Kelly celebrated receiving her annual cheque from Canada’s Public Lending Program, which gives authors royalties based on how often their book has been borrowed in our public libraries.
  • In The Buzz, the Toronto Public Library identified five books in its collection particularly prone to be challenged by would-be censors.
  • D-Brief suggests that, if bacteria managed to survive and adapt in the Atacama desert as it became hostile to life, like life might have done the same on Mars.
  • Far Outliers notes the crushing defeat, and extensive looting of, the MOghul empire by the Persia of Nader Shah.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the medal hauls of out Olympic athletes this year in Pyeongchang.
  • Imageo notes satellite imagery indicating that fisheries occupy four times the footprint of agriculture. Aquaculture is starting to look like a necessary idea, I think.

  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox praises Porch Fires, a new biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser, for its insights on Wilder and on the moment of the settlement of the American West.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, in the 19th century after the development of anesthesia, the ability to relieve people of pain was a political controversy. Shouldn’t it be felt, wasn’t it natural?
  • Language Hat links to an article taking a look behind the scenes at the Oxford English Dictionary. How does it work? What are its challenges?
  • At Lingua Franca, Roger Shuy distinguishes between different kinds of speech events and explains why they are so important in the context of bribery trials.
  • The LRB Blog shares some advice on ethics in statecraft from the 2nd century CE Chinese writer Liu An.
  • J. Hoberman at the NYR Daily reviews an exhibit of the work of Bauhaus artist Jozef Albers at the Guggenheim.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares an anecdote of travellers drinking homemade wine in Montenegro.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Native American drag queen and up-and-coming music star Vizin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how star S0-2, orbiting so close to the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy, will help prove Einsteinian relativity.
  • Vintage Space explains, for the record, how rockets can work in a vacuum. (This did baffle some people this time last century.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, on its 100th anniversary, Estonia has succeeded in integrating most of its Russophones.

[NEWS] Three notes about genetics and history and the future: Georgia, Beothuk, Amish

  • Archeological work has revealed evidence of vineyards in the Republic of Georgia dating back eight thousand years. National Geographic reports.
  • This extended article looks at the ways in which modern genetics are revealing the ancient history of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, using the Beothuk as an example. The Guardian has it.
  • Joe O’Connor describes how an obscure mutation among the Amish governing blood clotting may offer guides for people interested in extending human longevity, over at the National Post.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.

[NEWS] Five links, from Iceland’s skyr to Glasgow’s Tim Hortons to surfing and wine to space probes

  • Roads and Kingdoms shares Dave Hazzan’s reflections on the yougurt-type (but non-yogurt) Icelandic foodstuff skyr.
  • VICE reports on the scene from Glasgow after the launch of the city Tim Horton’s in Scotland.
  • Bloomberg features Javiera Quiroga’s take on the migration of Chilean vintners south ahead of climate change.
  • VICE notes that climate change will wreck the favourite coastline locations of surfers.
  • Dave Rothery describes at The Conversation how protecting against space probes’ environmental contamination challenges exploration.