A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘women

[NEWS] Five NYR Daily links: Colombia, slavery, churches, journalism, Shakespeare&Co (@nyr_daily)

  • The NYR Daily shares a report from Colombia, about the ways in which the filling of the Hidroituango Dam interacts with Colombia’s other social and political issues, here.
  • Sean Wilentz makes the compelling argument at the NYR Daily that the young United States was a critical venue for antislavery movements, here.
  • The NYR Daily tells the stories of two churches, one white and one black, as they merge, here.
  • The NYR Daily shares the stories of a half-dozen pioneering, but overlooked, black woman journalists in the United States, here.
  • Caitlin O’Keefe tells at the NYR Daily of how Paris bookstore Shakespeare and Company played a key role in the growth of feminism, here.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At anthro{dendum}, Amarilys Estrella writes about the aftermath of a car accident she experienced while doing fieldwork.
  • Architectuul notes at a tour of Berlin looking at highlights from an innovative year for architecture in West Berlin back in 1987.
  • Bad Astronomer notes that interstellar comet 2/Borisov is behaving surprisingly normally.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes briefly about the difficulty, and the importance, of being authentic.
  • Centauri Dreams shares some of the recent findings of Voyager 2 from the edge of interstellar space.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of a courtyard in Montpellier.
  • D-Brief notes a study of the genetics of ancient Rome revealing that the city once was quite cosmopolitan, but that this cosmopolitanism passed, too.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a 1972 single where Marvin Gaye played the Moog.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at Degas and the opera.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes a case, scientific and otherwise, against sending animals into space.
  • Far Outliers looks at a 1801 clash between the American navy and Tripoli pirates.
  • Gizmodo notes a theory that ancient primates learned to walk upright in trees.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Cayman Islands overturned a court ruling calling for marriage equality.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the experience of women under Reconstruction.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptional multilingualism of the Qing empire.
  • Language Log looks at circumstances where the Roman alphabet is used in contemporary China.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the forced resignation of Evo Morales in Bolivia, and calls for readers to take care with their readings on the crisis and the country.
  • Marginal Revolution considers a new sociological theory suggesting that the medieval Christian church enacted policy which made the nuclear family, not the extended family, the main structure in Europe and its offshoots.
  • Sean Marshall takes a look at GO Transit fare structures, noting how users of the Kitchener line may pay more than their share.
  • Neuroskeptic takes a look at the contradictions between self-reported brain activity and what brain scanners record.
  • Alex Hutchinson writes at the NYR Daily about human beings and their relationship with wilderness.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections considers the impact of drought in Australia’s New England, and about the need for balances.
  • The Planetary Society Blog offers advice for people interested in seeing today’s transit of Mercury across the Sun.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests Argentines may not have cared about their national elections as much as polls suggested.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an image of an ancient Charlottetown traffic light, at Prince and King.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the significant convergence, and remaining differences, between East and West Germany.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at some of the backstory to the Big Bang.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy suggests the Paris Accords were never a good way to deal with climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia shares someone arguing the policies of Putin are simple unoriginal Bonapartism.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Economy makes the case that slow economic recoveries are deep economic recoveries.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how the failure of the media to serve as effective critics of politics has helped lead, in the UK of Brexit, to substantial political change.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the idea, first expressed in comics, of Russian sardines.

[NEWS] Ten JSTOR Daily links: Beowulf, grain and beer, Sinclair, birds, TV, books …

  • JSTOR Daily considers race as a subject for discussion in Beowulf.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests the possibility that grain was domesticated not to produce bread, but rather to produce beer.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the wild rice of North America resisted efforts at domestication.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the Outer Banks Brewing Station, a North Carolina brewery powered by wind energy.
  • JSTOR Daily shares a classic essay by Upton Sinclair from 1906 on the issues of the American economy.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history of the pet bird in the 19th century United States.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the ways in which streaming television might not fragment markets and nations.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how Sylvia Beach, with help, opened legendary Paris bookstore Shakespeare & Co.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the surprisingly democratic origins of the Great Books of American literature.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how the horror movies of the 1970s and 1980s captured a new female audience by having more appealing girl and woman characters.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Winnipeg, Vancouver, Stockholm, Vienna, Mariupol

  • The salvaging and restoration of the Fortune Block in downtown Winnipeg is a victory indeed for preservationists. CBC reports.
  • One hopes that Vancouver manages to settle on a plan for revitalizing its West End beaches. Global News reports
  • Guardian Cities suggests that Stockholm has done a good job of keeping a proper work-life balance for its residents.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the specific contributions of women to modern Vienna.
  • Open Democracy reported before the Ukraine elections from the Donbas front line city of Mariupol, seeing how exhausted the locals were.

[NEWS] Five sci-fi links: cyberpunk zombies, Alita: Battle Angel, women, W40K, The Silent Star

  • Jesse Scott in The Guardian of Charlottetown considers the idea the cyberpunk might be in a process of being zombified.
  • McKenna Gray at On The A Side suggests that James Cameron’s decision to wait until the technology caught up to his vision helps make Alita: Battle Angel a success.
  • Wired notes the research of Lisa Yaszek, who argues the belief that early science fiction was lacking women writers is false, that it was instead a matter of misogynistic anthologists hiding women writers’ work.
  • This delightful Alex Hern article in The Guardian takes a look at how Warhammer40K has become such a huge hit.
  • Eric Schewe at JSTOR Daily looks at the 1960 East German SF film The Silent Star, a remarkably inclusive utopian vision of the future that–conceivably–did set a precedent for Star Trek.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: women’s sports, LGBTQ crime, Tommy Nutter, The Violators, Angelica Ross

  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at patterns of homophobia in women’s sports.
  • Hornet Stories notes how one study found LGBTQ youth are overrepresented among first offenders, and considers why this could be the case.
  • The Daily Beast notes a new book on fashion star Tommy Nutter that makes the point that AIDS killed so many brilliant people.
  • Them highlights a new exhibit, The Violators, comprising queer art banned from social media.
  • Wealth Simple shares the life story of trans Pose actor Angelica Ross, and how hard she worked to become a success.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani looks at the classical Mayan trade in pets, dogs and cats particularly.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage cheesecake ads for video and arcade games from 1980s Japan.
  • Dead Things considers an examination of the thesis that the fabulous horns of some dinosaurs were used as sexual signals.
  • Hornet Stories nominates some queer people to get stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
  • JSTOR Daily tells the story of Bobbi Gibb, the woman who in 1966 crashed the Boston Marathon.
  • Language Hattells of Toty Samed, an Angolan musician who writes songs not in the now-dominant Portuguese but in his ancestral Kimbundu.
  • Steven Attewell at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the ways in which the metaphor of mutants has been used by Marvel Comics to explore themes of racism and marginalization.
  • At the LRB Blog, Matthew Porges notes how European Union opposition to the annexation of Western Sahara by Morocco is counterbalanced by the need to keep Morocco as a partner.
  • r/mapporn shared a beautiful map of the Great Lakes, Nayanno-Nibiimaang Gichigamiin or “The Five Freshwater Seas”, from the Ojibwe perspective.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Christian Tate’s transit-style map of Middle Earth.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an essay arguing against the United States’ dropping the penny and the nickel, on the grounds that these expensive coins are loss-leaders for currency generally.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at early 20th century Russian philosopher Ivan Ilyan, a man whose influence is visible in the Putin era.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the eye-catching male photography of Ekaterina Zakharova.
  • David Post’s analysis at the Volokh Conspiracy of the contract between Stormy Daniels and Donald Trump is a must-read.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian government has failed to cultivate soft power, or wider influence, in the West.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers methods for detecting early life telescopically on exoplanets.
  • Crooked Timber considers how legislators bear personal responsibility, morally at least, for consequences of the legislations that they pass.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports that the new TESS telescope may well be capable of spotting dense clouds of satellites in geosynchronous orbit of exoplanets as distant as 100 light years.
  • Far Outliers considers how in Iran, the veil worn by a woman was a status symbol, for her husband and family as much as for the woman.
  • Language Hat reports on the strange survival of the classical manuscript Alexandra.
  • Language Log suggests that the Confucius Institute network set up by China does not seem to spread Chinese language so much as Chinese culture.
  • As the Mueller investigation continues, Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests many of the players in the Trump Administration are facing a real-life version of the prisoner’s dilemma.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how maps of London’s Chiswick have been compiled into a public mural.
  • The NYR Daily has an amusing sketched review of the Michaelangelo exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum. (My pictures will be coming!)
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at some of the fashion unveiled by Gucci in their recent Milan show.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how cosmic inflation means that, despite the speed of light and the universe’s age of 13.8 billion years, we can see things now 46 billion light years away.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at some of the social factors going into nuclear accidents.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a familiar sort of pattern, of Central Asian migrants held in Russian prisons spreading Islam among their fellow detainees.

[ISL] Five islands notes: Caribbean and Jamaica migration, Diomedes, Indonesia, Finland

  • Lyman Stone, at In A State of Migration, takes a look at the slow population growth in even the well-off Caribbean, thanks to substantial emigration.
  • At Jamaica Observer, Edward Seaga summarizes the history of Jamaican emigration–economically necessary–and worries about the impact of Trump.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Big Diomede and Little Diomede, two islands in the Bering Strait that not only have different sovereigns (the US and Russia) but different dates, too.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at how the indigenous population of Siberut, an Indonesian island west of Sumatra, are dealing with the effects of deforestation and cultural disruption.
  • Global News reports on an entrepreneur who wants to make an island in Finland into a women-only resort.

[NEWS] Five notes on migration: Asians in the US, Ghana to Libya, Indian women, Brazil, Canada

  • Noah Smith notes at Bloomberg View that Trump’s bizarre opposition to chain migration would hit (for instance) Asian immigrant communities in the United States quite badly.
  • The Inter Press Service shares one man’s nearly fatal attempt to migrate from his native Ghana through Libya.
  • The Inter Press Service notes a hugely underestimated system of migration within India, that of women moving to their new husbands’ homes.
  • In an extended piece, the Inter Press Service examines how wars and disasters are driving much immigration to Brazil, looking particularly at Haiti and Venezuela as new notable sources.
  • Canada is a noteworthy destination for many immigrants who move here to take part in Canadian sports, including the Olympics. The Mational Post reports.