A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘worldpride

[PHOTO] A lovely fairy queen on Yonge

A lovely fairy queen on Yonge

This might well be my favourite photo of 2014. Everything seemed to work.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 2, 2015 at 5:59 pm

[PHOTO] Cawthra Park, one month after WorldPride

Cawthra Park, one month after WorldPride #toronto #torontophotos #churchandwellesley #cawthrapark #worldpride

Written by Randy McDonald

July 23, 2014 at 2:40 am

[PHOTO] Looking south on Church towards Carlton

One of the nice things I like about festivals like WorldPride is that entire streets are closed off, allowing people unexpected vistas. I took two photos of the view south on Church towards Carlton, the first below with my regular camera and the second with my new smartphone. I lean towards preferring the first, myself; it feels more intimate, closer up.

Looking south on Church towards College (1)

Looking south on Church towards College (2)

Written by Randy McDonald

July 11, 2014 at 12:04 am

[PHOTO] Some final WorldPride pictures

Rooftop WorldPride celebrants, Yonge and Wellesley

Rooftop WorldPride celebrants, Yonge and Wellesley

A Pride-themed storefront in the Annex

Pride-themed storefront in The Annex (1)

Pride-themed storefront in The Annex (2)

Pride-themed display window at Dudley’s Hardware, Church and Wellesley

Pride-themed display window at Dudley's Hardware

Written by Randy McDonald

July 8, 2014 at 2:14 pm

[PHOTO] Alexander Wood on Church, 2012 and 2014

The photo below of the statue of Alexander Wood is one of several orphan pictures of mine taken during Pride.

Statue of Alexander Wood in the Village, from below

In October 2012 I took night-times photo of the statue. Below is one of the photos, and what I wrote at the time.

Alexander Wood at Nuit Blanche (1)

On the night of Nuit Blanche, I went to the northwestern corner of Church and Alexander–just two blocks south of the fabled intersection of Church and Wellesley–to take photos of sculptor Del Newbigging‘s statue of Scottish-born merchant Alexander Wood, unveiled in 2005. Located next to the compass painted on the sidewalk at the same corner, Newbigging’s statue of Wood has become something of a community landmark, quite literally a touchstone–apparently some locals rub the statue for good luck before dates.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 6, 2014 at 11:55 pm

[PHOTO] Miscellaneous shots of WorldPride Toronto, 2014

The Pride crowd at Yonge and Bloor

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The Pride crowd at Yonge and Wellesley

The Pride crowd at Yonge and Wellesley

The Pride crowd on Yonge south of College

Pride crowd on Yonge south of College

John Tory at WorldPride, Toronto

John Tory at WorldPride, Toronto

The Pride crowd on Church south of Maitland

The Pride crowd on Church south of Maitland

WorldPride parade (1)

WorldPride parade (1)

Parade watchers on rooftops at Yonge and Wellesley #worldpride

WorldPride parade (2)

WorldPride parade (3)

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The WorldPride street fair on Church

The WorldPride street fair on Church

Written by Randy McDonald

July 5, 2014 at 6:04 pm

[PHOTO] 94 Wellesley Eastbound, WorldPride edition

94 Wellesley Eastbound, WorldPride edition

This was my only shot of the rainbow-decaled 94 Wellesley bus, here photographed travelling east of Church towards Castle Frank.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 4, 2014 at 2:11 pm

[PHOTO] A lovely fairy queen on Yonge

A lovely fairy queen on Yonge

I wanted to single out this one photo from the many I took on WorldPride because I’m so pleased with the composition of this photo.

Everything worked out: the posing of the drag queen (here, on Yonge just south of College); the distribution of the audience; at a courtly distance all around her; the light struggling down through the hot humid day as if casting a divine glow from above.

It was beautiful.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 3, 2014 at 11:59 am

[PHOTO] Three rainbows in Church and Wellesley during WorldPride

I saw this rainbow on a parade float.

A rainbow in the Pride parade

This rainbow was on an apartment balcony, a display by a man welcoming people to WorldPride.

A rainbow on an apartment balcony

This final rainbow was in the front window of Ladybug Florist just north of Church and Wellesley.

A rainbow in a shop window

Written by Randy McDonald

June 30, 2014 at 2:06 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “Community activists concerned about TAVIS policing”

I was first alerted by a Torontoist post about possible neighbourhood concerns about policing in the Sherbourne and Dundas area during WorldPride. Patty Winsa’s Toronto Star article goes into greater detail about these concerns.

Toronto police view the area from Wellesley south to Queen, and from Church east to Parliament, as one of the city’s most violent.

Community workers look at the neighbourhood in 51 Division and see marginalized people who need housing and help.

Those divergent views may clash as close to 30 officers with the Toronto Anti-Violence Intervention Strategy start sweeping through the area Monday as part of a summer initiative that will last until Sept. 8.

“We think this neighbourhood has a lack of resources, including housing, and these are the issues this community faces. Arresting people isn’t going to solve these socio-economic issues,” said Zoe Dodd, a community worker and volunteer with the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty.

At a press conference Monday, the group, along with Jane Finch Action Against Poverty, the Toronto Sex Workers Action Project called “Maggies,” and the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence, said the additional police presence wasn’t welcome and asked for it to end.

“Our biggest problem is that we don’t think policing will solve the issues of this neighbourhood,” said Dodd, and “that over-policing is actually using tactics of harassment, carding and ticketing of people, especially people that are homeless and young men of colour.”

A Star investigation found that on average, TAVIS officers stop, question and document people — called “carding” — at a higher rate than regular officers in any division. Blacks were more likely than whites to be carded by police in each of Toronto’s 70-plus police patrol zones.

Police said the area was targeted because an analysis of crime rates over the years and incidents per square kilometre showed the neighbourhood had among the highest numbers of calls for service regarding shootings, robberies and violence.

“The neighbourhood has been chosen because of its high concentration of violent activity and not because of its racial, ethnic or socioeconomic make-up,” police spokesperson Meaghan Gray said in an email.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 18, 2014 at 3:59 am