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[BLOG] Five JSTOR Daily links (@jstor_daily)

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  • JSTOR Daily provides advice for users of Zotero and Scrivener, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at instances where product placement in pop culture went badly, here.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the import of a pioneering study of vulgar language in the context of popular culture studies, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the–frankly terrible–policies of managing rival heirs in the Ottoman dynasty, here.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at generational divides on religion in the England of the early Protestant Reformation, here.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthropology.net notes a remarkably thorough genetic analysis of a piece of chewing gum 5700 years old that reveals volumes of data about the girl who chew it.
  • ‘Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen writes an amazing review of Cats that actually does make me want to see it.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on galaxy NGC 6240, a galaxy produced by a collision with three supermassive black holes.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog writes about the mechanics of journalism.
  • Centauri Dreams argues that the question of whether humans will walk on exoplanets is ultimately distracting to the study of these worlds.
  • Crooked Timber shares a Sunday morning photo of Bristol.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that India has a launch date of December 2021 for its first mission in its Gaganyaan crewed space program.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the Saturn C-1 rocket.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers if the vogue for minimalism meets the criteria to be considered a social movement.
  • Far Outliers ?notes how, in the War of 1812, some in New England considered the possibility of seceding from the Union.
  • Gizmodo looks at evidence of the last populations known of Homo erectus, on Java just over a hundred thousand years ago.
  • Mark Graham links to a new paper co-authored by him looking at how African workers deal with the gig economy.
  • io9 announces that the Michael Chabon novel, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, is set to become a television series.
  • Joe. My. God. shares a report that Putin gave Trump anti-Ukrainian conspiracy theories.
  • JSTOR Daily considers what a world with an economy no longer structured around oil could look like.
  • Language Hat takes issue with the latest talk of the Icelandic language facing extinction.
  • Language Log shares a multilingual sign photographed in Philadelphia’s Chinatown.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the document release revealing the futility of the war in Afghanistan.
  • The LRB Blog looks at class identity and mass movements and social democracy.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution suggests that, even if the economy of China is larger than the United States, Chinese per capita poverty means China does not have the leading economy.
  • Diane Duane at Out of Ambit writes about how she is writing a gay sex scene.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reflects on “OK Boomer”.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Mexican chef Ruffo Ibarra.
  • Peter Rukavina shares his list of levees for New Year’s Day 2020 on PEI.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map indicating fertility rates in the different regions of the European Union.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how quantum physics are responsible for vast cosmic structures.
  • Charles Soule at Whatever explains his reasoning behind his new body-swap novel.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the negotiations between Russia and Ukraine in Paris show the lack of meaningful pro-Russian sentiment there.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell talks about his lessons from working in the recent British election.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at a syncretic, Jewish-Jedi, holiday poster.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope shares an essay he recently presented on artificial intelligence and its challenges for us.
  • P. Kerim Friedman writes at {anthro}dendum about the birth of the tea ceremony in the Taiwan of the 1970s.
  • Anthropology net reports on a cave painting nearly 44 thousand years old in Indonesia depicting a hunting story.
  • Architectuul looks at some temporary community gardens in London.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on the weird history of asteroid Ryugu.
  • The Buzz talks about the most popular titles borrowed from the Toronto Public Library in 2019.
  • Caitlin Kelly talks at the Broadside Blog about her particular love of radio.
  • Centauri Dreams talks about the role of amateur astronomers in searching for exoplanets, starting with LHS 1140 b.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber looks at what is behind the rhetoric of “virtue signalling”.
  • Dangerous Minds shares concert performance from Nirvana filmed the night before the release of Nevermind.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes new evidence that, even before the Chixculub impact, the late Cretaceous Earth was staggering under environmental pressures.
  • Myron Strong at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about how people of African descent in the US deal with the legacies of slavery in higher education.
  • Far Outliers reports on the plans in 1945 for an invasion of Japan by the US.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing gathers together a collection of the author’s best writings there.
  • Gizmodo notes the immensity of the supermassive black hole, some 40 billion solar masses, at the heart of galaxy Holm 15A 700 million light-years away.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res writes about the issue of how Wichita is to organize its civic politics.
  • io9 argues that the 2010s were a decade where the culture of the spoiler became key.
  • The Island Review points readers to the podcast Mother’s Blood, Sister’s Songs, an exploration of the links between Ireland and Iceland.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the claim of the lawyer of the killer of a mob boss that the QAnon conspiracy inspired his actions. This strikes me as terribly dangerous.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at a study examining scholarly retractions.
  • Language Hat shares an amusing cartoon illustrating the relationships of the dialects of Arabic.
  • Language Log lists ten top new words in the Japanese language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the dissipation of American diplomacy by Trump.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the many problems in Sparta, Greece, with accommodating refugees, for everyone concerned.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting the decline of the one-child policy in China has diminished child trafficking, among other crimes.
  • Sean Marshall, looking at transit in Brampton, argues that transit users need more protection from road traffic.
  • Russell Darnley shares excerpts from essays he wrote about the involvement of Australia in the Vietnam War.
  • Peter Watts talks about his recent visit to a con in Sofia, Bulgaria, and about the apocalypse, here.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the corporatization of the funeral industry, here.
  • Diane Duane writes, from her own personal history with Star Trek, about how one can be a writer who ends up writing for a media franchise.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections considers the job of tasting, and rating, different cuts of lamb.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a nondescript observatory in the Mojave desert of California that maps the asteroids of the solar system.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Eduardo Chavarin about, among other things, Tijuana.
  • Drew Rowsome loves the SpongeBob musical.
  • Peter Rukavina announces that Charlottetown has its first public fast charger for electric vehicles.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog considers the impact of space medicine, here.
  • The Signal reports on how the Library of Congress is making its internet archives more readily available, here.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how the incredibly isolated galaxy MCG+01-02-015 will decay almost to nothing over almost uncountable eons.
  • Strange Company reports on the trial and execution of Christopher Slaughterford for murder. Was there even a crime?
  • Strange Maps shares a Coudenhove-Kalergi map imagining the division of the world into five superstates.
  • Understanding Society considers entertainment as a valuable thing, here.
  • Denis Colombi at Une heure de peine announces his new book, Où va l’argent des pauvres?
  • John Scalzi at Whatever looks at how some mailed bread triggered a security alert, here.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the massive amount of remittances sent to Tajikistan by migrant workers, here.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes a bizarre no-penguins sign for sale on Amazon.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At anthro{dendum}, Amarilys Estrella writes about the aftermath of a car accident she experienced while doing fieldwork.
  • Architectuul notes at a tour of Berlin looking at highlights from an innovative year for architecture in West Berlin back in 1987.
  • Bad Astronomer notes that interstellar comet 2/Borisov is behaving surprisingly normally.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes briefly about the difficulty, and the importance, of being authentic.
  • Centauri Dreams shares some of the recent findings of Voyager 2 from the edge of interstellar space.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of a courtyard in Montpellier.
  • D-Brief notes a study of the genetics of ancient Rome revealing that the city once was quite cosmopolitan, but that this cosmopolitanism passed, too.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a 1972 single where Marvin Gaye played the Moog.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at Degas and the opera.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes a case, scientific and otherwise, against sending animals into space.
  • Far Outliers looks at a 1801 clash between the American navy and Tripoli pirates.
  • Gizmodo notes a theory that ancient primates learned to walk upright in trees.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Cayman Islands overturned a court ruling calling for marriage equality.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the experience of women under Reconstruction.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptional multilingualism of the Qing empire.
  • Language Log looks at circumstances where the Roman alphabet is used in contemporary China.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the forced resignation of Evo Morales in Bolivia, and calls for readers to take care with their readings on the crisis and the country.
  • Marginal Revolution considers a new sociological theory suggesting that the medieval Christian church enacted policy which made the nuclear family, not the extended family, the main structure in Europe and its offshoots.
  • Sean Marshall takes a look at GO Transit fare structures, noting how users of the Kitchener line may pay more than their share.
  • Neuroskeptic takes a look at the contradictions between self-reported brain activity and what brain scanners record.
  • Alex Hutchinson writes at the NYR Daily about human beings and their relationship with wilderness.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections considers the impact of drought in Australia’s New England, and about the need for balances.
  • The Planetary Society Blog offers advice for people interested in seeing today’s transit of Mercury across the Sun.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests Argentines may not have cared about their national elections as much as polls suggested.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an image of an ancient Charlottetown traffic light, at Prince and King.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the significant convergence, and remaining differences, between East and West Germany.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at some of the backstory to the Big Bang.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy suggests the Paris Accords were never a good way to deal with climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia shares someone arguing the policies of Putin are simple unoriginal Bonapartism.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Economy makes the case that slow economic recoveries are deep economic recoveries.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how the failure of the media to serve as effective critics of politics has helped lead, in the UK of Brexit, to substantial political change.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the idea, first expressed in comics, of Russian sardines.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • {anthro}dendum features a post by Kimberly J. Lewis about strategies for anthropologists to write, and be human, after trauma.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on exoplanet LHC 3844b, a world that had its atmosphere burned away by its parent star.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at Neptune from the perspective of exoplanets discovered near snow lines.
  • D-Brief reports on the new Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, installed at Kitt Peak to help map galaxies and dark energy.
  • Gizmodo
  • looks at how Airbnb is dealing with party houses after a fatal mass shooting.
  • The Island Review shares some drawings by Charlotte Watson, inspired by the subantarctic Auckland Islands.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the late 19th century hit novel Ramona, written by Helen Hunt Jackson to try to change American policy towards indigenous peoples.
  • Language Hat looks at how, until recently, the Faroese language had taboos requiring certain words not to be used at sea.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at a proposal to partially privatize American national parks.
  • The LRB Blog looks at what Nigel Farage will be doing next.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a speculative theory on the origins of American individualism in agrarian diversity.
  • The NYR Daily looks at an exhibition of the artwork of John Ruskin.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw remarks on a connection between Arthur Ransome and his region of New England.
  • Drew Rowsome shares an interview with folk musician Michelle Shocked.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel emphasizes the importance of the dark energy mystery.
  • Towleroad notes a posthumous single release by George Michael.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society celebrates the 12th anniversary of his blog, and looks back at its history.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Ingushetia after 1991.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at All Saints Day.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Anthrodendum features a guest post from editors introducing a series on fieldwork and trauma.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin takes a stab at trying to define neoliberalism as an ideology, not just a catch-all phrase.
  • The Crux looks at desalination, a difficult process that we may need to use regardless of its difficulty.
  • D-Brief notes that narcissism is linked to lower levels of stress and depression.
  • Jezebel notes the return and legacy of Bratz dolls.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the Sam Smith cover of the Donna Summer classic “I Feel Love”, along with other versions of that song.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if graphene will ever become commercially usable.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an analysis warning about commercial debt. Another 2008?
  • Marginal Revolution points to some papers suggesting that cannabis usage does not harm cognition, that the relationship is if anything reversed.
  • Daphne Merkin at the NYR Daily looks back at her literary life, noting people now gone.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the new Daniel MacIvor play Let’s Run Away.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how the Trump Administration lost two cases against sanctuary cities.
  • Window on Eurasia considers, briefly, the idea of Gorbachev giving to Germany Kaliningrad, last remnant of East Prussia.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative looks at the rises in health spending directed towards young people. Is this a warning sign of poor health?
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at Gaysper, and then at other queer ghosts.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the new X-ray telescope eROSITA.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence of a recent collision between planets in the system of BD +20 307.
  • D-Brief notes the appearance of a strange new sort of storm on Saturn.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery by astronomers of a set of orbits that can direct comets into the inner solar system.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage shares some vintage Skylab photos of his native Massachusetts.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in 1786, the United states was uninclined to pay tribute to the Barbary States.
  • Gizmodo’s George Dvorsky reports on a new fossil discovery showing how quickly mammals took over after the Cretaceous.
  • The Island Review shares an essay by photographer Alex Boyd about his new book Isles of Rust, drawing from Lewis & Harris.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at sustainable butchery.
  • Language Hat notes that Sumerian cuneiform is now in Unicode.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log notes how the Indo-Iranian “don” so commonly forms part of the hydronyms for major European rivers.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money calls for an in-depth investigation of Donald Trump, not necessarily an impeachment.
  • The LRB Blog examines the background of the mass protests in Santiago and wider Chile.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an illuminating cartogram depicting the #elxn43 results in Canada.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the government of China has been using the NBA to buy social peace.
  • The NYR Daily interviews Naomi Oreskes about her campaign to have the science behind global warming, and the actions of the scientists involved, understood.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper concluding that traditional gender specializations in British families no longer provide a reproductive advantage.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the speed of gravity must equal the speed of light, if general relativity is to work.
  • Window on Eurasia examines the rapid and uncontrolled growth of urban populations in Kazakhstan.