A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘writing

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly re-introduces herself to her readers.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares one man’s theory about how extraterrestrials could use exoplanet sightings to build up a galactic communications network.
  • Far Outliers shares some unusual Japanese words, starting with “amepotu” for American potato.
  • Language Hat takes</a. note of an effort to preserve the Kiowa language.
  • Did the spokeswoman of the NRA threaten to “fisk” the New York Times or threaten something else? Language Log reports.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that, compared to San Francisco, Toronto does not have much of a public kink scene.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the quantum reasons behind the explosion produced by sodium metal and water.
  • Understanding Society takes rightful issue with The Guardian’s shoddy coverage of Dearborn, Michigan, and that city’s Muslims and/or Arabs.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Canada is, at last, starting to take in queer refugees from Chechnya.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the embarrassing support for Jean-Luc Mélenchon for Venezuela. Was opposing the US all he wanted?

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Dangerous Minds points readers to Cindy Sherman’s Instagram account. (“_cindysherman_”, if you are interested.)
  • Language Hat takes note of a rare early 20th century Judaeo-Urdu manuscript.
  • Language Log lists some of the many, many words and phrases banned from Internet usage in China.
  • The argument made at Lawyers, Guns and Money about Trump’s many cognitive defects is frightening. How can he be president?
  • The LRB Blog notes that many traditional Labour voters, contra fears, are in fact willing to vote for non-ethnocratic policies.
  • The NYR Daily describes a book of photos with companion essays by Teju Cole that I like.
  • Of course, as Roads and Kingdom notes, there is such a thing as pho craft beer in Vietnam.
  • Peter Rukavina notes</a. the genetic history of mice in New York City and the beavers of Prince Edward Island.
  • Towleroad notes a love duet between Kele Okereke and Olly Alexander.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy seems unconvinced by the charges against Kronos programmer Marcus Hutchins.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams reports on the apparent rarity of exomoons of close-orbiting planets.
  • The collapse of the nuclear renaissance is touched on at Crooked Timber. Is it all down to renewables now?
  • Language Hat shares</a. a lovely passage taking a look at writing and memory from an ethnography of central Africa.
  • The outlawing of the Uygur language from the schools of Xinjiang was mentioned at Language Log. This is terrible.</li?
  • The anti-Semitism barely veiled in a Texas campaign against the Democratic Party, noted by Lawyers, Guns and Money, frightens me.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Sylvia Plath stayed in the United Kingdom, far from home, substantially because of the NHS.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the extent to which the economy and the wealth of the South depends on slavery.
  • Had Mexican-American relations gone only trivially differently, Noel Maurer suggests, Mexico could either have been much larger or substantially smaller.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.
  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.
  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the challenges and the prospects of laser SETI.
  • Citizen Science Salon reports on a couple who have done their best to keep their bee numbers up.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Milo’s book, contrary to Milo’s claims, has performed very badly indeed in the UK, among other places.
  • Language Log features a poetic digression by Victor Mair on Chinese characters for words like “plum” and “wine.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that moderate Republicans in Congress might not be all that.
  • The LRB Blog considers Nice at, and after, the time of last year’s terrorist attacks.
  • Marginal Revolution features Tyler Cowen’s description of his writing processes.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Toronto gay photographer Dylan Rosser.
  • Unicorn Booty looks back at the history of the queercore movement–gay punk, as a first approximation.
  • Vintage Space links to an article explaining why there was neither an Apollo 2 nor an Apollo 3.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian state is undermining various once-allied Russian nationalist movements.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith updates his readers about the progress of his various writing projects.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the Battle of Mosul waged against ISIS.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of rogue binary planet 2MASS J11193254–1137466, two super-Jupiters by themselves.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the raw photography of early 20th century New York City’s Weegee.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is rightly unimpressed by the reflexive Russophilia of The Nation. Imperialism is still imperialism …
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen strongly recommends Dali, in the Chinese province of Yunnan, for tourists.
  • The NYR Daily features Masha Gessen, looking at the truth underneath the lies of Trump.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer makes a case that Macron’s use of “civilizational” to describe Africa’s issues might be the subject of over-quick outrage.
  • Peter Rukavina describes his two weeks with a Nokia N95, without a modern smartphone. There was good and bad to this.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle explains, with photos, what hoverflies are and why they are so important.
  • Understanding Society considers a fraught question: what paths to modernization were open for China in the 1930s, before the People’s Republic?
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, in 30 years, Moscow will be a megacity with a large population of (substantially immigrant) Muslim origin.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links, from marijuana laws to the AGO to Wattpad to laneway suites

  • What will happen to the legal records of those convicted of marijuana-related charges once legalization comes? The Toronto Star considers.
  • NOW Toronto reviews a new exhibit of First Nations-oriented work at the AGO.
  • NOW Toronto features an article showing how Toronto startup Wattpad is making celebrity fanfic (among other things) economically lucrative for writers.
  • Torontoist considers the idea of laneway suites as a way to deal with the city’s housing crisis.