A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘youtube

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: D-Day, pot shops, YouTube, Toronto Dance Theatre, Crossways

  • Jamie Bradburn looks at how, 75 years ago, the media of Toronto responded to D-Day.
  • Illegal marijuana shops in Toronto are being literally closed to the public, by the city putting large concrete blocks in their front doorways. blogTO reports.
  • YouTube shutting down its space for creators in Toronto is not good news for aspiring local video stars. blogTO reports.
  • Christopher House, long-time director of the Toronto Dance Theatre, is leaving his position. NOW Toronto reports.
  • Amy Carlberg writes at blogTO about how the Crossways, the giant brutalist apartment towers at Dundas and Bloor, are becoming trendy, with a line of merchandise and the hashtag #crosswayswednesdays on Instagram.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul looks at some architecturally innovative pools.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Wolf 359, a star made famous in Star Trek for the Starfleet battle there against the Borg but also a noteworthy red dwarf star in its own right.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how the NASA Deep Space Atomic Clock will play a vital role in interplanetary navigation.
  • The Crux considers the “drunken monkey” thesis, the idea that drinking alcohol might have been an evolutionary asset for early hominids.
  • D-Brief reports on what may be the next step for genetic engineering beyond CRISPR.
  • Bruce Dorminey looks at how artificial intelligence may play a key role in searching for threat asteroids.
  • The Island Review shares some poetry from Roseanne Watt, inspired by the Shetlands and using its dialect.
  • Livia Gershon writes at JSTOR Daily about how YouTube, by promising to make work fun, actually also makes fun work in psychologically problematic ways.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how the relatively small Taiwan has become a financial superpower.
  • Janine di Giovanni at the NYR Daily looks back at the 2000 intervention in Sierra Leone. Why did it work?
  • Jamais Cascio at Open the Future looks back at a 2004 futurological exercise, the rather accurate Participatory Panopticon. What did he anticipate correctly? How? What does it suggest for us now to our world?
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that LightSail 2 will launch before the end of June.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how the discovery of gas between galaxies helps solve a dark matter question.
  • Strange Company shares a broad collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia makes the obvious observation that the West prefers a North Caucasus controlled by Russia to one controlled by Islamists.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at American diner culture, including American Chinese food.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: George Daniell, Black Party, Troye Sivan, Natalie Wynn, Pete Buttigieg

  • Queerty profiles the new permanent exhibition in Miami of mid-20th century photographer George Daniell, whose works often including queer subjects date back to the 1940s.
  • Mike Miksche writes at Slate about the import of the Black Party in New York City in 1989, for partying gay and bi men in the era of AIDS.
  • This extended interview with Troye Sivan at The Guardian exposes a lot of this out star.
  • This VICE interview with Contrapoints star Natalie Wynn makes me want to start watching her, now, on YouTube.
  • John Aravosis is quite right to argue, at The Daily Beast, that arguing Pete Buttigieg is not gay enough is ridiculous.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: James Barry, Madonna, Maddie Blaustein, Wilton Manors, LIlly Singh

  • Them notes the transphobia involved in novelist E.J. Levy’s apparent determination to note define 19th century doctor James Barry as a trans man in an upcoming novel.
  • Hornet Stories notes the long history of support of Madonna for LGBTQ people and causes, from the 1980s on.
  • Them tells the story of trans writer voice actor Maddie Blaustein, perhaps most famous for voicing the character of Meowth from Pokémon.
  • VICE reports from Wilton Manors, the Florida town where all the government officials are LGBTQ.
  • The coming-out of YouTube star Lilly Singh as bisexual is huge news, for South Asians and the wider community. (How To Be A Bawse is a great book.) VICE Congratulations! has it.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams extends further consideration the roles that artificial intelligences might play in interstellar exploration.
  • D-Brief notes that the genes associated with being a night owl also seem to be associated with poor mental health outcomes.
  • Far Outliers looks at the lifeboat system created on the upper Yangtze in the late 19th century.
  • Kashmir Hill, writing at Gizmodo, notes how blocking Google from her phone left her online experience crippled.
  • Imageo notes that, even if halted, global warming still means that many glaciers well melt as they respond to temperature changes.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the racism that permeated ads in 19th century North America.
  • Language Hat looks at how some Turkish-speaking Christians transcribed the Turkish language in the Greek alphabet.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how utterly ineffective the Trump Administration’s new refugee waiver system actually is.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the film and theatre career of Lorenza Mazetti.
  • Marginal Revolution notes, in passing, the import of being a YouTube celebrity.
  • Molly Crabapple at the NYR Daily writes about the work of the New Sanctuary coalition, which among other things waits with refugees in court as they face their hearings.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle looks for traces of the elusive muskrat.
  • Towleroad shares footage of New Order performing the early song “Ceremony” in 1981.
  • Transit Toronto notes that Metrolinx now has an app for Presto up!
  • At Vintage Space, Amy Shira Teitel looks at the Soviet Moon exploration program in 1969.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the new pressures being placed by rising Islamism and instability in Afghanistan upon Turkmenistan.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers, briefly, the little is known about the lives of 1980s gay porn stars Greg Patton and Bobby Pyron. How did they lead their lives?

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the bizarre extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua, as does Centauri Dreams, as does Bruce Dorminey. Yes, this long cylindrical extrasolar visitor swinging around the sun on a hyperbolic orbit does evoke classic SF.
  • The Boston Globe’s The Big Picture shares some photos of autumn from around the world.
  • D-Brief examines how artificial intelligences are making their own videos, albeit strange and unsettling ones.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some Alfred Stieglitz photos of Georgia O’Keefe.
  • Daily JSTOR takes a look at the mulberry tree craze in the United States.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining at water delivery to terrestrial planets in other solar systems. Worlds with as little water as Earth are apparently difficult to produce in this model.
  • Hornet Stories profiles the gay destination of Puerto Vallarta, in Mexico.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the new vulnerability of Haitian migrants in the United States.
  • The LRB Blog notes the end of the Mugabe era in Zimbabwe.
  • The NYR Daily features a stellar Elaine Showalter review of a Sylvia Plath exhibition at the Smithsonian National Picture Gallery.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on how the production of New England Cheese reflects the modernization of Australian agriculture.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the awkward position of Rohingya refugees in India, in Jammu, at a time when they are facing existential pressures from all sides.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares twenty beautiful photos of Mars.
  • Towleroad shares a fun video from Pink, “Beautiful Trauma”, featuring Channing Tatum.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that a Trump executive order threatening sanctuary cities has been overturned in court.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one study claiming that the children of immigrant workers in Russia tend to do better than children of native-born Russians.

[NEWS] Five links: American gun owners, Japanese inequality, Polish politics, Lexit, #elsagate

  • The small minority of American gun owners who own huge numbers of guns, more than they could seemingly use, is the subject of this study at The Guardian.
  • The Japanese economy may be growing, but so is inequality, Bloomberg reports.
  • This Open Democracy examination of the sharpening political divides in Poland, particularly outside of Warsaw, is gripping. It starts with the self-immolation of Upper Silesian Piotr Szczęsny in his country’s capital.
  • Julian Savarer takes a look at the many problems with “Lexit”, the idea of a left-wing argument for Brexit.
  • James Bridle looks at the complex human and artificial mechanisms behind the production of so much wrong children’s video content. #elsagate is only the tip of it all. Medium hosts the article.