A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares an image of Hyperion, a proto-supercluster of galaxies literally jawdropping in scope.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly asks an interesting question: Who is your rock, your support? Who is your gravel?
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new paper suggesting a way to determine the size of undetected planets from the sorts of dust that they create.
  • Crooked Timber notes the obvious, that neither China nor the United States would win in a war in the South China Sea.
  • D-Brief ,a href=”http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2018/10/16/ganymede-moon-jupiter-world-tectonic-faults/”>notes that Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter and in the solar system, has tectonic faults in its icy crust.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia is interested in cooperating with India in space travel.
  • David Finger at The Finger Post reports on his search for a Philly cheese steak sandwich in Philadelphia.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing considers the way in which modern social networking creates a totalitarianism, enlisting people through games into supporting its edifice.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Thailand is preparing to legalize civil unions for same-sex couples.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the 19th century heyday of “mummy brown”, a paint pigment used by artists made of ground-up Egyptian mummies.
  • Language Log notes that the expression “add oil”, originally from Chinese slang, is now in the OED.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the lies of Facebook about the popularity on online video dealt a terrible blow to journalism.
  • Lingua Franca examines how the word “smarmy” came about and spread.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the exceptional generosity of actor Chow Yun Fat, who is giving away his vast estate.
  • Hugh Eakin at the NYR Daily takes a look at the role of the United States in mounting repression in Saudi Arabia, symbolized by the Khashoggi killing.
  • Marc Rayman at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the achievements of the Dawn probe, at Ceres and Vesta and the points in between, on this its 11th anniversary.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a photo essay looking at the difficult treks of the Rohingya as they are forced to scavenge firewood from a local forest.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the homoerotic photography of James Critchley.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at what it was likely, in the early universe, when starlight became visible for the first time.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps debunks a map purporting to show post-Fukushima contamination of the entire Pacific, and has it with false and discouraging apocalyptic maps generally.
  • Window on Eurasia takes a look at the deep divide between the Russian and Ukrainian nations.
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