A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘southeast asia

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • blogTO notes that Suspect Video is liquidating its stock.
  • James Bow likes a portable USB adaptor.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to an analysis of the spectrum of a Luhman 16 brown dwarf.
  • Language Log notes Sino-Western characters.
  • The Map Room Blog reports on a Twitter bot that randomly generates maps of fantasy settings.
  • Maximos62 notes the terrible pollution produced by the Indonesian forest burning.
  • Otto Pohl reports from Kurdistan.
  • Torontoist shares a photo of a graffiti alley near Trinity Bellwoods.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on current trends in Russian migration from Kazakhstan.
  • Arnold Zwicky describes the female gaze of the paintings of men done by Sylvia Sleigh.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bloomberg talks about Poland’s problems with economic growth, notes that McMansions are poor investments, considers what to do about the Olympics post-Rio, looks at new Japanese tax incentives for working women, looks at a French war museum that put its stock up for sale, examines the power of the New Zealand dairy, looks at the Yasukuni controversies, and notes Huawei’s progress in China.
  • Bloomberg View is hopeful for Brazil, argues demographics are dooming Abenomics, suggests ways for the US to pit Russia versus Iran, looks at Chinese fisheries and the survival of the ocean, notes that high American population growth makes the post-2008 economic recovery relatively less notable, looks at Emperor Akihito’s opposition to Japanese remilitarization, and argues that Europe’s soft response to terrorism is not a weakness.
  • CBC notes that Russian doping whistleblowers fear for their lives, looks at how New Brunswick farmers are adapting to climate change, and looks at how Neanderthals’ lack of facility with tools may have doomed them.
  • The Globe and Mail argues Ontario should imitate Michigan instead of Québec, notes the new Anne of Green Gables series on Netflix, and predicts good things for Tim Horton’s in the Philippines.
  • The Guardian notes that Canada’s impending deal with the European Union is not any model for the United Kingdom.
  • The Inter Press Service looks at child executions in Iran.
  • MacLean’s notes that Great Lakes mayors have joined to challenge a diversion of water from their shared basin.
  • National Geographic looks at the elephant ivory trade, considers the abstract intelligence of birds, considers the Mayan calendar’s complexities, and looks at how the young generation treats Pluto’s dwarf planet status.
  • The National Post notes that VIA Rail is interested in offering a low-cost bus route along the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia.
  • Open Democracy notes that the last Russian prisoner in Guantanamo does not want to go home, and wonders why the West ignores the Rwandan dictatorship.
  • TVO considers how rural communities can attract immigrants.
  • Universe Today suggests sending our digital selves to the stars, looks at how cirrus clouds kept early Mars warm and wet, and notes the discovery of an early-forming direct-collapse black hole.
  • Variance Explained looks at how Donald Trump’s tweets clearly show two authors at work.
  • The Washignton Post considers what happens when a gay bar becomes a bar with more general appeal.
  • Wired notes that the World Wide Web still is far from achieving its founders’ dreams, looks at how news apps are dying off, and reports on the Univision purchase of Gawker.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Bloomberg notes the closure of Poland’s frontier with Kaliningrad, looks at how Google is beating out Facebook in helping India get connected to the Internet, notes British arms makers’ efforts to diversify beyond Europe and examines the United Kingdom’s difficult negotiations to get out of the European Union, looks at the problems of investing in Argentina, looks at the complications of Germany’s clean energy policy, observes that the Israeli government gave the schools of ultra-Orthodox Jews the right not to teach math and English, examines the consequences of terrorism on French politics, and examines at length the plight of South Asian migrant workers in the Gulf dependent on their employers.
  • Bloomberg View notes Donald Trump’s bromance with Putin’s Russia, examines Melania Trump’s potential immigrant problems, and is critical of Thailand’s new anti-democratic constitution.
  • CBC looks at how some video stores in Canada are hanging on.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that the Olympic Games marks the end of a decade of megaprojects in Brazil.
  • MacLean’s approves of the eighth and final book in the Harry Potter series.
  • The National Post reports on a Ukrainian proposal to transform Chernobyl into a solar farm, and examines an abandoned plan to use nuclear weapons to unleash Alberta’s oil sands.
  • Open Democracy looks at the relationship between wealth and femicide in India, fears a possible coup in Ukraine, looks at the new relationship between China and Africa, examines the outsized importance of Corbyn to Britain’s Labour Party, and looks how Armenia’s defeat of Azerbaijan has given its veterans outsized power.
  • Universe Today notes proposals for colonizing Mercury, looks at strong support in Hawaii for a new telescope, and examines the progenitor star of SN 1987A.
  • Wired emphasizes the importance of nuclear weapons and deterrence for Donald Trump, and looks at how many cities around the world have transformed their rivers.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Bloomberg notes that Brexit might drive British migration to Australia, suggests Russia’s recession might be coming to an end, looks at carbon emissions from dead trees, and reports on Guiliani’s liking for Blackberry.
  • Bloomberg View notes Israel’s tightening restrictions on conversions and looks at how Putin has become a US election issue.
  • CBC notes the construction in Turkey for a cemetery for participants in the recent coup.
  • Gizmodo reports on flickering AR Scorpii, an unusual binary.
  • The Inter Press Service reports on urban land tenure for migrants and describes Malawi’s recent translocation of elephants.
  • MacLean’s describes the Chinese labourers of the First World War.
  • The National Post notes the marginalization of conservative white men in the Democratic Party.
  • Open Democracy looks at politics for the United Kingdom’s Remain minority, looks at Scotland’s European options, and suggests Hillary needs to learn from the lessons of Britain’s Remain campaign to win.
  • The Toronto Star notes the plans of Tim Horton’s to expand to Southeast Asia, starting with the Philippines.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO looks at some of the high points in the Yonge and Eglinton condo boom.
  • D-Brief notes a demonstration in orangutans of some of the traits needed for speech, and language.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the isolated young star CX330.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on a late 1970s yearbook for Siouxsie and the Banshees.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that perchlorate salts are all over Mars.
  • The NYRB Daily notes the particular tenor of Chinese nationalism makes it difficult to deal with the South China Sea.
  • Savage Minds starts a discussion about the ethnography of violence.
  • Torontoist carries the guest essay of a Caribana fan who will be giving the festival another try.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia has returned to the stagnation of the pre-Gorbachev 1980s.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell finds, on reanalysis, a positive connection between Brexit support and Austerity.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg notes concerns over Northern Ireland’s frontiers, looks at how Japanese retailers are hoping to take advantage of Vietnam’s young consumers, examines the desperation of Venezuelans shopping in Colombia, looks at Sri Lankan interest in Chinese investment, suggests oil prices need to stay below 40 dollars US a barrel for Russia to reform, observes that Chinese companies are increasingly reluctant to invest, and suggests Frankfurt will gain after Brexit.
  • Bloomberg View gives advice for the post-Brexit British economy, looks at how Chinese patterns in migration are harming young Chinese, suggests Hillary should follow Russian-Americans in not making much of Putin’s interference, and looks at the Israeli culture wars.
  • CBC considers the decolonization of placenames in the Northwest Territories, notes Canada’s deployment to Latvia was prompted by French domestic security concerns, and looks at an ad promoting the Albertan oil sands that went badly wrong in trying to be anti-homophobic.
  • The Inter Press Service considers the future of Turkey and looks at domestic slavery in Oman.
  • MacLean’s looks at China’s nail house owners, resisting development.
  • The National Post reports from the Colombia-Venezuela border.
  • Open Democracy considers the nature of work culture in the austerity-era United Kingdom, looks at traditions of migration and slavery in northern Ghana, examines European bigotry against eastern Europeans, and examines the plight of sub-Saharan migrants stuck in Morocco.
  • Universe Today notes two nearby potentially habitable rocky worlds, reports that the Moon’s Mare Imbrium may have been result of a hit by a dwarf planet, and reports on Ceres’ lack of large craters.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg notes Ireland’s huge unexpected recent reported growth, looks at the deindustrialization of Israel, observes Deutsche Bank’s need to search for wealth abroad, looks at the demographic imperatives that may keep healthy Japanese working until they are 80, notes the slipping ANC grip on Pretoria and looks at the rise of anti-Muslim Pauline Hanson in Australia, and predicts Brexit could kill the London property boom.
  • Bloomberg View calls for calm in the South China Sea.
  • CBC notes some idiot YouTube adventurers who filmed themselves doing stupid, even criminal, things in different American national parks.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on the plans for a test tidal turbine in the Bat of Fundy by 2017.
  • MacLean’s looks at the heckling of a gay musician in Halifax and reports on the civil war in South Sudan.
  • The New York Times looks at the new xenophobia in the east English town of Boston.
  • Open Democracy notes that talk of a working class revolt behind Brexit excludes non-whites, and reports on alienation on the streets of Wales.
  • Wired looks at how some cash-strapped American towns are tearing up roads they cannot afford to maintain.
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