A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘southeast asia

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond quotes a Vladimir Putin statement on geopolitics.
  • blogTO shares photos from Yorkdale’s expansion.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at more evidence for Planet Nine.
  • Dead Things notes evidence that right-handedness has been predominant among hominins for some time.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the discovery of three hot Jupiters.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the Philippines’ shift towards China.
  • The Planetary Society Weblog looks at ExoMars’ mission and the failure of the Schiaparelli lander.
  • Torontoist notes that the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan has bought Constellation Wineries, making some Canadian wineries Canadian-owned again.
  • Towleroad reports on a Europe-wide census of LGBT identities.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi notes that Hillary Clinton is winning because she puts work into it.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Putin’s changing style of governance.

[URBAN NOTE] “Singapore’s $24 Billion Wipeout Eats Into Its Shipyard Base”

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Bloomberg reports on the economic hit Singapore is taking from an economic downtown in its shipyards.

Customers have dwindled by the week at Indian Masala Hut, a curry stall in Singapore’s shipyard heartland. Manager K. Muralidoss blames the slump in oil rig-building that led to the elimination of thousands of jobs, many held by workers from India and Bangladesh.

“The lunchtime crowd has more than halved,” Muralidoss says, surveying the almost-empty Benoi Road food court, where only four of 12 hawker stalls were open one afternoon last week. As recently as September, he was busy filling orders from companies trying to sate hungry laborers working overtime. “That has come down quite a bit because there are fewer projects being worked on.”

More than $400 billion of proposed energy projects worldwide have been delayed since mid-2014 and pushed into 2017 and beyond, according to consulting firm Wood Mackenzie Ltd. In Singapore, the global center for oil-rig construction for decades, the slowdown contributed to the economy contracting the most in four years in the third quarter.

BP Plc abandoned oil exploration off the Great Australian Bight, it said last week, five years after beginning a search for resources in one of the world’s last frontier regions. BP had previously estimated the drilling program would cost more than A$1 billion ($769 million).

Written by Randy McDonald

October 19, 2016 at 3:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “Singapore Is Crushing Hong Kong in the Race to Cut Home Prices”

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Bloomberg’s Pooja Thakur Mahrotri and Frederik Balfour report on how the two Chinese-majority city-states in East Asia are dealing, differently, with real estate prices.

On the surface, the property markets in Singapore and Hong Kong have much in common. The two Asian financial hubs have both moved to rein in runaway home prices in recent years as they sought to make housing more affordable.

Yet, consider how home values in the cities have diverged. Singapore has been successful in damping buyer demand with curbs (prices slumped by the most in seven years last month), while restrictions have had little impact on Hong Kong’s gravity-defying market, which is rebounding after a short-lived dip.

Hong Kong’s resurgent property market poses a headache for Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, who’s been touting his success cooling property prices ahead of a March vote to determine the city’s leadership for the next five years. Leung has introduced a raft of measures to cool the housing market since 2012 and his record may weigh on China’s decision to keep backing him.

Leung, who hasn’t said whether he’ll seek a second term, has struggled with low popularity through his tenure, including mass democracy protests in 2014 fueled in part by the city’s yawning wealth gap. He received an approval rating of less than 39 percent last month, compared with a high of almost 57 percent before taking office, according to the University of Hong Kong Public Opinion Programme.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 7, 2016 at 9:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross imagines what might become possible with cheap heavy spacelift.
  • blogTO notes the vandalization of the iconic Toronto sign during Nuit Blanche.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering the detectability of interstellar comets.
  • Language Log looks at Chinese language transcriptions for Obama, Hillary, and Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at impending hard Brexit and notes how the economy of Thailand is dominated by Bangkok.
  • The NYRB Daily writes at length about its apparent discovery of the identity of Elena Ferrante.
  • Savage Minds shares a Bolivian perspective on Donald Trump.
  • Strange Maps shares a list of ten potential Jewish homelands outside of Palestine.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at quiet Chechen dissidence and warns about the consequences of Putin’s repressions.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell worries about the people soon to be in charge of the United Kingdom’s Brexit negotiations.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Big Picture shares photos of motorbike racing in South Africa.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the stellar weather that planets of red dwarf stars might encounter.
  • Dead Things looks at two genetic studies which complicate the narrative of humanity’s spread.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the infamous anti-disco night of 1979 that spelled the end of the genre in North America.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers how one makes a home among strangers.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the UKIP MP claims the sun is responsible for the bulk of the Earth’s tides not the moon, and reports on a Kentucky judge who says gays ruined straight men’s ability to hug.
  • Language Log looks at changing patterns of language usage in Japanese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money mocks the cosmic perspective of Gary Johnson.
  • The LRB Blog reports from devastated Lesbos.
  • Maximos62 maps the smoke from this year’s Indonesian fires.
  • The NYRB Daily shares vintage photos from mid-1960s Cuba.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on a recent tour of NASA facilities.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a call for a single Circassian alphabet, suggests a Russian initiative to use sufism to unite Russian Muslims will end badly, and argues that Russian criticism of language policy in post-Soviet countries is linked to geopolitics.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • blogTO notes that Suspect Video is liquidating its stock.
  • James Bow likes a portable USB adaptor.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to an analysis of the spectrum of a Luhman 16 brown dwarf.
  • Language Log notes Sino-Western characters.
  • The Map Room Blog reports on a Twitter bot that randomly generates maps of fantasy settings.
  • Maximos62 notes the terrible pollution produced by the Indonesian forest burning.
  • Otto Pohl reports from Kurdistan.
  • Torontoist shares a photo of a graffiti alley near Trinity Bellwoods.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on current trends in Russian migration from Kazakhstan.
  • Arnold Zwicky describes the female gaze of the paintings of men done by Sylvia Sleigh.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg talks about Poland’s problems with economic growth, notes that McMansions are poor investments, considers what to do about the Olympics post-Rio, looks at new Japanese tax incentives for working women, looks at a French war museum that put its stock up for sale, examines the power of the New Zealand dairy, looks at the Yasukuni controversies, and notes Huawei’s progress in China.
  • Bloomberg View is hopeful for Brazil, argues demographics are dooming Abenomics, suggests ways for the US to pit Russia versus Iran, looks at Chinese fisheries and the survival of the ocean, notes that high American population growth makes the post-2008 economic recovery relatively less notable, looks at Emperor Akihito’s opposition to Japanese remilitarization, and argues that Europe’s soft response to terrorism is not a weakness.
  • CBC notes that Russian doping whistleblowers fear for their lives, looks at how New Brunswick farmers are adapting to climate change, and looks at how Neanderthals’ lack of facility with tools may have doomed them.
  • The Globe and Mail argues Ontario should imitate Michigan instead of Québec, notes the new Anne of Green Gables series on Netflix, and predicts good things for Tim Horton’s in the Philippines.
  • The Guardian notes that Canada’s impending deal with the European Union is not any model for the United Kingdom.
  • The Inter Press Service looks at child executions in Iran.
  • MacLean’s notes that Great Lakes mayors have joined to challenge a diversion of water from their shared basin.
  • National Geographic looks at the elephant ivory trade, considers the abstract intelligence of birds, considers the Mayan calendar’s complexities, and looks at how the young generation treats Pluto’s dwarf planet status.
  • The National Post notes that VIA Rail is interested in offering a low-cost bus route along the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia.
  • Open Democracy notes that the last Russian prisoner in Guantanamo does not want to go home, and wonders why the West ignores the Rwandan dictatorship.
  • TVO considers how rural communities can attract immigrants.
  • Universe Today suggests sending our digital selves to the stars, looks at how cirrus clouds kept early Mars warm and wet, and notes the discovery of an early-forming direct-collapse black hole.
  • Variance Explained looks at how Donald Trump’s tweets clearly show two authors at work.
  • The Washignton Post considers what happens when a gay bar becomes a bar with more general appeal.
  • Wired notes that the World Wide Web still is far from achieving its founders’ dreams, looks at how news apps are dying off, and reports on the Univision purchase of Gawker.