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[NEWS] Some Sunday links

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  • The Atlantic notes Thailand’s “fake children”, life-sized dolls that are charms.
  • Bloomberg View considers the costs to the United Kingdom of Brexit and the costs and benefits of said to the European Union.
  • Discover looks at the increasingly appreciated place of South Africa in hominid origins.
  • The Inter Press Service examines the closure of Bedouin settlements in Israel.
  • MacLean’s celebrates the Yukon Gold potato’s 50th anniversary.
  • National Geographic looks at the growing number of problems faced by the baboons of Cape Town.
  • The New Yorker considers what might be in the suppressed 28 pages of the 9/11 report.
  • Phys.org maps Neanderthal and Denisovan ancestry worldwide.
  • Reuters notes the discovery of the first monkey fossils in North America.
  • Slate hosts an article complaining about the normalization of Berlin since reunification.
  • The Washington Post mourns the bleaching of nearly all of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

[NEWS] Some Saturday links

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  • The BBC suggests bird-like dinosaurs survived the Cretaceous catastrophe because they could eat seeds.
  • Bloomberg wonders what lessons Poland has for China’s economy.
  • Bloomberg View examines immigration controversies in Malaysia.
  • CBC notes that Manulife is now providing life insurance for HIV-positive people.
  • Gizmodo reports from the Pyongyang subway.
  • The Guardian notes the sequencing of Ozzy Osbourne’s DNA.
  • The National Post reports that Québec NDP MP Ruth Ellen Brosseau might well be considering a run for the NDP leadership.
  • Newsweek reports on the decision of the Wall Street Journal to run an ad denying the Armenian genocide.
  • Finally, there has been much written after the death of Prince. Some highlights: The Atlantic looks at how he was a gay icon, Vox shares 14 of his most important songs, the Toronto Star notes his connection to Toronto, Dangerous Minds shares videos of early performances, The Daily Beast explains Prince’s stringent control of his content on the Internet, and In Media Res mourns the man and some of his songs.

[NEWS] Some Thursday links

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  • The Sacramento Bee reports that UC Davis spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on trying to salvage its reputation online, after famously being linked with security guards pepper-spraying student protesters.
  • Bloomberg notes China’s island-building spree in the South China Sea is causing environmental damage, notes Hungary may lose out on future investment because of labour shortages, and notes London property prices are sliding because of Brexit.
  • The Guardian suggests Russians do not care about Putin’s corruption.
  • The Independent reports on a Muslim anti-ISIS march not covered by mainstream media.
  • MacLean’s writes about the NDP, about the hard left turn, about James Laxer’s criticism of the Leap manifesto, and about the disinterest of Megan Leslie and other NDPers in going for the leadership.
  • The National Post notes the potential huge market for insects as human food and notes controversy over First Nations support for a controversial wind energy farm.
  • Quartz notes the culture gap between Koreans and Korean-Americans.
  • In the Toronto Star, Emma Teitel writes about how the pronoun “they” is easy to use.
  • Wired looks at a brain implant that gave a quadriplegic man control of his arm.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Bloomberg notes the defection of 13 North Korean workers at an overseas restaurant to the South, reports that Venezuela has declared Friday a holiday to try to save on power consumption, wonders if low oil prices will hurt the Philippines through diminished remittances from the Middle East, notes that Russian efforts at import substitution are failing, and argues against a $15 minimum wage in the United States.
  • The Inter Press Service reports on how forests can help solve urban water scarcity issues.
  • MacLean’s notes the general attack in Alberta on Mulcair, from the NDP and from the Wildrose Party.
  • The National Post notes the export of old homes from British Columbia to the United States, and looks at how Russia’s targeting of terrorists’ families works out.
  • The Dragon’s Tales linked to this PNAS article speculating as to why Mars is so small relative to Earth.
  • Wired notes how a study that was product of fraud ended up apparently being confirmed by research conducted by the same whistleblowers. How tragic for the first author.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope creates a taxonomy of cliches of space opera.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that HD 100453 has a red dwarf hiding in its protoplanetary disk.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the history of Charon.
  • Imageo notes that the moisture streaming into California ultimately comes from the Philippines.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers Silver Age Magneto, a character that at best has potential.
  • Transit Toronto notes the plans to rebuild Dupont Station.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy is skeptical of Trump’s renunciation of torture.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the different permutations of perceptions of non-heterosexuality.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO notes that, this summer, there will be a play in Toronto about Target Canada’s demise set in an old Target store.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos of women using boxy early 1980s office computers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper suggesting most super-Earths are mini-Neptunes and to another noting the odd disk of L1455 IRS1.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at the huge problem of corporate debt in China.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a new Indonesian ban on “effeminate” men from television.
  • Language Hat notes German/Polish ethnolinguistic tensions in late medieval Poland.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a link to posters of the New York subway.
  • The Planetary Society Blog introduces readers to the new Lightsail 2 cubesat.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the terrible housing shortage in the coastal United States, especially the most desirable areas of said.
  • Torontoist notes York University’s construction of new dorms.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the continuation of Western sanctions against Russia depends on Ukraine’s continued reforms.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes issue with WordPress’ categorization system, from a linguistic perspective.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Dangerous Minds notes a Brazilian artist who has gotten some controversy over turning religious figurines into superheroes.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that in the last five years, Japan’s population has shrunk by one million.
  • Joe. My. God. notes an Indonesian parliamentarian who has called for homosexuals to be put to death.
  • Language Hat looks at the multilingualism of medieval Europe.
  • Language Log notes tablets which have problems displaying Chinese documents.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Donald Trump as a con artist.
  • The Map Room Blog considers if transit maps are too complicated for users.
  • Marginal Revolution notes declining labour force participation among middle-aged maps.
  • pollotenchegg looks at demographic changes in 2015 over Ukraine.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if Trump would wreck the relationship with Mexico and looks at the relatively moderate nature of his claims on his website, suggesting mockery is the best response to Trump.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Ukrainian claims that Russia is creating military units staffed by Ukrainian citizens, and notes reports on an ethnic clash between members of a military unit in Chechnya.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World notes the awkward position of Serbs and Albanians in Kosovo, the first wanting to join Serbia and the second wanting access to the European Union.
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