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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘southeast asia

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlyn Kelly talks about the rejuvenating effects of “forest bathing”. I quite agree, myself.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the idea of Project Blue, a dedicated astronomy satellite to look for exoplanets at Alpha Centauri.
  • D-Brief notes that astrophysicists have verified an eclipse described in the Bible circa 1207 BCE.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to another KIC 8462852 study, finding its dimming is best explained by circumstellar debris.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the importance of being careful with the use of numbers.
  • Far Outliers explores how Singapore managed to position itself as a safe destination for tourists visiting Asia.
  • Language Hat links to a beautiful passage from Kim Stanley Robinson’s Aurora on the messiness of language.
  • Language Log takes a look at the phenomenon of headlessness in the propaganda of North Korea.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the sad short life of Stanwix Melville.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares multiple images, with multiple perspectives, of Giordano Bruno crater on the Moon.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw finds the use of Section 44 of the Australian Constitution to disqualify politicians as dual nationals ridiculous.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of Saint-Tropez.
  • Arnold Zwicky meditates on language, moving from the strange names of the parts of flowers to the X-Men.
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[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Anthropology.net looks at Adam Rutherford’s new book A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, about the human family tree.
  • Crooked Timber argues that secret British government reports on Brexit really should be leaked.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that the concept of “Luddites” deserves to be revisited.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the potential for emojis to overwhelm Unicode, as does Language Log.
  • The LRB Blog reports on some astounding jokes about sexual assault made on British television.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the state of the search for Planet Nine.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look on the people who live in one of Manila’s largest cemeteries.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes God’s Own Country, a British film that tells the story of two gay farmers in love.
  • Starts With a Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines why the gravitational wave of GW170817 arrived 1.7 seconds before the light.
  • Mark Simpson takes issue with the recent study suggesting sexual orientations could be determined from profile pics.
  • Strange Company tells of how a ghost hunter had a terrible time trying to track down one supposed haunter.
  • Strange Maps notes an 1864 map of the United States imagining a future country divided into four successor states.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at a recent study of the position of small farmers in India.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the economic role of immigrants in Russia is critical, to the tune of 10% of GDP.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on the naming of the features of the surface of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that small-scale robotic manufacturing is now a thing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on a new study of exoplanets and their stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales has a nice round-up of news on hominin research and primates generally.
  • Hornet Stories notes that there is apparently a debate about women as drag queens. I don’t see why they should not, frankly.
  • Joe. My. God links to a Rolling Stone article celebrating Erotica and Sex, by Madonna, on their 25th anniversary.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the way Dollar General caters to a permanent underclass. Like Dollarama in Canada?
  • Language Hat notes that Xibe, related to Manchu, is receiving protection from China.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the mass killings, approaching genocide, in Indonesia in 1965.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the proofs we have for the current age of the universe.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at enormous, explosive Wolf-Rayet stars, and at WR 124 in particular.
  • The Big Picture shares heart-rending photos of Rohingya refugees fleeing Burma.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the potential of near-future robotic asteroid mining.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of vast cave systems on the Moon, potential homes for settlers.
  • Hornet Stories exposes young children to Madonna’s hit songs and videos of the 1980s. She still has it.
  • Inkfish notes that a beluga raised in captivity among dolphins has picked up elements of their speech.
  • Language Hat notes a dubious claim that a stelae containing Luwian hieroglyphic script, from ancient Anatolia, has been translated.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the question of preserving brutalist buildings.
  • The LRB Blog considers how Brexit, intended to enhance British sovereignty and power, will weaken both.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that the moons and planets of the solar system have been added to Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily considers how the Burmese government is carefully creating a case for Rohingya genocide.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer concludes, regretfully, that the market for suborbital travel is just not there.
  • Visiting a shrimp festival in Louisiana, Roads and Kingdoms considers how the fisheries work with the oil industry (or not).
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent abduction in Chechnya of singer Zelimkhan Bakayev, part of the anti-gay pogrom there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that rebuilding Kaliningrad as a Russian military outpost will be expensive.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a team of students who caught footage of the August solar eclipse from a high-altitude balloon.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that the early Moon apparently had a very thin atmosphere for tens of millions of years.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to Elon Musk’s descriptions of his space ambitions.
  • Hornet Stories notes that many on the alt-right are upset that game Wolfenstein is all about shooting Nazis.
  • The LRB Blog notes the almost ridiculous irony of Conservative Theresa May wearing a bracelet with the image of radical leftist Frida Kahlo.
  • Russell Darnley looks at efforts to get Singapore restaurants to shift away from using environmentally damaging palm oil.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the overwhelming power of the NRA in the modern United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers ways we can do SETI better by having a less Eurocentric understanding of our own history.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Uzbekistan and Kyrgzystan could solve border issues through swapping enclaves.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the corrosive effect of Bannon, and journalistic culture generally, on politics.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • At The Big Picture, the Boston Globe shares some of its best photos from September.
  • Drone 360 notes that drones are being used to track polar bear populations.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas notes how people too often abandon moral responsibility to the machines which administer algorithms with real-world consequences.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the remarkable story of hockey star Jaromir Jagr.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an official guide to map-making from Austria-Hungary.
  • The NYR Daily notes how official Myanmar has invented Rohingya violent extremism out of practically nothing.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shows readers where you can eat kosher in Mexico City.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares a tweetstorm of his talking about the problems with daily word totals for writers.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross bets that barring catastrophe, the US under Trump will dispatch crewed circumlunar flights.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the evolution of birds, through speculation on how the beak formed.
  • Language Log looks at the ways Trump is represented, and mocked, in the languages of East Asia.
  • Noting the death toll in a Mexico City sweatshop, Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that sweatshops are dangerous places to work.
  • The NYR Daily notes the many structural issues likely to prevent foreign-imposed fixes in Afghanistan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from a seemingly unlikely date festival held in the depths of the Saudi desert.
  • Rocky Planet reports that Mount Agung, a volcano in Indonesia, is at risk of imminent eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a new stage adaptation in Toronto of the Hitchcock classic, North by Northwest.
  • Strange Company reports on how the Lonergans disappeared in 1998 in a dive off the Great Barrier Reef. What happened to them?
  • Towleroad notes how Chelsea Manning was just banned from entering Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia claims that the Russian language is disappearing from Armenia.
  • Arnold Zwicky maps the usage of “faggot” as an obscenity in the United States.