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Posts Tagged ‘space science

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the Elon Musk proposal to terraform Mars by dropping nuclear weapons on the planet’s ice caps is a bad idea.
  • James Bow writes about how the introduction of faeries saved his novel The Night Girl.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the storms of Jupiter.
  • The Crux explains the mystery of a village in Poland that has not seen the birth of a baby boy for nearly a decade.
  • D-Brief looks at the exoplanets of nearby red dwarf Gliese 1061.
  • Cody Delisraty talks of Renaissance painter Fra Angelico.
  • Drew Ex Machina commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Voyager 2 flyby of Neptune.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares links to some papers about the Paleolithic.
  • JSTOR Daily hosts an essay by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger suggesting that Internet rot might be good since it could let people start to forget the past and so move on.
  • Language Hat questions whether the phrase “free to all” has really fallen out of use.
  • Language Log takes a look about immigration to the United States and Emma Lazarus’ famous poem.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with the suggestion of, among other, Henry Farrell, that we are headed away from globalization towards fortress economies. Redundancy, he suggests, will be more important.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a disturbing paper suggesting users of opioids use them in part for social reasons.
  • The NYR Daily features an exchange on a new law in Singapore seeking to govern fake news.
  • The Power and the Money features a guest post from Leticia Arroyo Abad looking at Argentina before the elections.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at a new play by Raymond Helkio examining the life of out boxer Mark Leduc.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if we can test gravitational waves for wave-particle duality.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the many flowers of Gamble Garden, in Palo Alto.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul notes a bike tour of Bauhaus architecture in Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes the discovery of Beta Pictoris c, a second super-Jovian planet in that young system.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that the NASA Europa Clipper is moving ahead.
  • Crooked Timber shares a gorgeous night photo of San Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice.
  • The Crux notes what we are learning about the Denisovans.
  • D-Brief notes that Neanderthals were prone to swimmer’s ear.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some of the pop culture likes of Karl Marx.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the exoplanets of GJ 1061.
  • Earther notes how Icelanders mourned the loss of a glacier in a ceremony.
  • Whitney Kimball at Gizmodo looks at what the mass data loss of more than a decade’s worth of music at Myspace means for our Internet era.
  • Imageo shares photos of spiraling cloud formations photographed at night from space.
  • Ian Humberstone at The Island Review writes about his witnessing of the bonxies, birds of the Shetlands.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a report suggesting Trump joked about swapping Greenland for Puerto Rico.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the rhythmic dancing of the Shakers in 18th century America marked that sect as different.
  • Language Hat considers the humour of some philosophers.
  • Language Log notes the oblique commentaries of Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing on his city-state’s protests.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the idiocy of the Trump fetish for Greenland.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how astronomers have mapped the Local Void, of deep intergalactic space.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the future of Venice might be found in its becoming a Chinese portal into Europe.
  • Sean Marshall notes how the Ford government is undermining conservation in Ontario.
  • The NYR Daily shares some of the New York City photography of Phil Penman.
  • Starts With A Bang’s notes the immense storms of Saturn.
  • Strange Company shares a weekend collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Belarus plans on reorganizing its internal structures to try to minimize rural depopulation.
  • Nick Rowe at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative talks about monetary policy in metaphors.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguins from around the world.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Saira Mehmood blogs at {anthro}dendum about her experiences as an ethnographer in her New Orleans community.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait blogs about Supernova 2016iet, a rare example of a pair-instability supernova.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly writes about the need of people to avoid isolation.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that future astronomers might be able to detect the fluorescence of life on exoplanets during flares.
  • Why, Crooked Timber asks, shouldn’t children be given the vote?
  • D-Brief notes scientists have manufactured a ring of carbon atoms.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the complexities of #VanLife in the United States, at once a lifestyle choice in the US and a response to poverty.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is decidedly unimpressed by the recent rewriting of the Statue of Liberty.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at how neuroimaging studies study surprisingly few left-handers, and how this is a problem.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Big Data in China is enhancing state power, concentrating on the situation in Xinjiang.
  • Drew Rowsome looks at a new documentary on the genesis of Fiddler on the Roof, Fiddler: Miracle of Miracles.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how dark matter and black holes can interact.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at coded anti-black racism in the 1937 United States.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul takes a look at different retrofuture imaginings from the 20th century of what architecture might look like in the 21st century.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the mysteries surrounding a sudden recent eruption of Sagittarius A*.
  • Centauri Dreams considers what the James Webb Space Telescope might be able to pick up from TRAPPIST-1.
  • Henry Farrell at Crooked Timber considers Ossian’s Ride, a SF novel by Fred Hoyle imagining a progressive Ireland leapfrogging ahead of Britain, and how this scenario is being realized now.
  • D-Brief looks at what a glitch in the spin rate of the Vela pulsar reveals about these bodies.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at how Rock Hudson came to star in the SF film Seconds.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new NASA Kepler study suggesting (very) broadly Earth-like worlds might orbit as many as one in six Sun-like stars.
  • Gizmodo links</u. to a study suggesting the oddly fuzzy core of Jupiter might be a consequences of an ancient collision with a massive protoplanet.
  • Imageo notes that July broke all sorts of climate records.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Trump administration has exempted Bibles from the new China tariffs.
  • Language Hat considers, after the space of a decade, why people might say a language is so foreign as to be Greek.
  • Robert Farley links at Lawyers, Guns and Money to an analysis of what major battle fleets around the world would have looked like in 1950 absent a Second World War.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the UK Conservative government’s turn towards repressive law-and-order measures will please Faragists.
  • The Map Room Blog shares maps indicating the scale of the American opioid crisis.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution links to one of his columns noting how two decades of nil economic growth has harmed Italy.
  • Peter Watts at his blog has a critical take on the Chinese SF movie The Wandering Earth.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how things are becoming quite bad for Kashmiris.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the OSIRIS-REx team is looking for sample sites on asteroid Bennu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the evidence from our solar system’s moons that two planets can indeed stably share the same orbit.
  • Towleroad notes how a successful campaign has helped London fetish bar Backstreet survive gentrification.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some gorgeous blue and black flowers in the Gamble Garden of Palo Alto, and meditations on said.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the strange galaxy NGC 5866.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly looks at some of her prep work when she covers a news story.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of using the Earth itself for gravitational lensing.
  • D-Brief notes a newly-discovered fossil parrot from New Zealand, a bird nearly one metre in size.
  • Far Outliers looks at the values of cowrie shells in 19th century central Africa. What could they buy?
  • Gizmodo notes the limited circumstances in which IMDb will allow transgender people to remove their birth names from their records.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the abortive American state of Franklin.
  • Language Hat notes a 19th century Russian exile’s experience with the differences between Norwegian and Swedish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes, after Epstein, the incompetence that too often characterizes American prisons.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the importance of slavery in the history of Venice.
  • The NYR Daily notes how W.H. Auden was decidedly unimpressed by the Apollo moon landing, and why.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the import of astronomers’ discovery of an ancient early black hole.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shares a vertical world map from China.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers how competent the Nuclear Regulatory Commission actually is.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the internal divides of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Shir Lerman Ginzburg at anthro{dendum} writes about kintsugi in her own life.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the massive black hole, massing two billion suns, measured in the heart of NGC 3258.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares some photos from her Hudson River life.
  • D-Brief notes how astronomers may be able to detect the radio signals emitted from the cores of planets orbiting dead stars.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the sociology of religion.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Ferdinand Magellan acted in many ways like a pirate.
  • Language Hat reports on the remarkable differences between the two dubbed French versions of The Simpsons, one in France and one in Québec.
  • Language Log reports on the Chinese placename “Xinjiang Uygur.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Joe Biden is too old, too set in his ways, to be president.
  • Molly Crabapple writes at the NYR Daily about the nature and goals of the massive protest movement in Puerto Rico.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks even-handedly at the controversy surrounding the idea of building the Thirty Metre Telescope on top of sacred Mauna Kea.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at controversy in Russia over the representation of different Tatar populations on the Russian 2020 census.
  • Stephen Gordon at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative wonders why it was 1953 that, in Canada, saw the growth in women on the job market.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the galaxy’s stores of star-forming gas are running low, here.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the next generation of gravitational wave detectors could detect exoplanets, massive worlds orbiting binary white dwarfs.
  • The Crux reports on what is known about Homo naledi.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the risks of social isolation.
  • Far Outliers reports on three enclaves of Arab culture encountered by early Western explorers in 19th century East Africa.
  • Gizmodo notes the steady progress made by LightSail 2 in its travel around the world.
  • The Island Review shares the Phillip Miller poem “Biennale”, inspired by Venice.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the Norwegian Arctic island of Svalbard works without border controls.
  • The NYR Daily notes that while America is not Rome, it thinks it is.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains some oddities of Higgs bosons.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at how the Kyshtym nuclear disaster occurred.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that 5% of Russian Orthodox parishes in Ukraine have defected so far to the Ukrainian church.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell applies information and management theory to Brexit.