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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘space science

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} shares a new take on the atmosphere, as a common good.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a photo of Earth taken from a hundred million kilometres away by the OSIRIS-REx probe.
  • The Crux tells the story of how the first exoplanets were found.
  • D-Brief notes that life could be possible on a planet orbiting a supermassive black hole, assuming it could deal with the blueshifting.
  • io9 looks at the latest bold move of Archie Comics.
  • JSTOR Daily explores cleaning stations, where small fish clean larger ones.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the role China seeks to play in a remade international order.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the new upcoming national atlas of Estonia.
  • Marginal Revolution touches on the great ambition of Louis XIV for a global empire.
  • Steve Baker of The Numerati shares photos from his recent trip to Spain.
  • Anya Schiffrin at the NRY Daily explains how American journalist Varian Fry helped her family, and others, escape the Nazis.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the classic movie The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a map looking at the barriers put up by the high-income world to people moving from outside.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel answers the complex question of how, exactly, the density of a black hole can be measured.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever reviews Gemini Man. Was the high frame rate worth it?
  • Window on Eurasia notes the deep hostility of Tuvins towards a large Russian population in Tuva.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the existential question of self-aware cartoon characters.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} compares different sorts of public bathing around the world, from Native America to Norden to Japan.
  • Charlie Stross at Antipope is unimpressed by the person writing the script for our timeline.
  • Architectuul reports on an architectural conference in Lisbon.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of the eruption of the Raikoke volcano in Kamchatka.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at what the Voyager spacecraft have returned about the edge of the solar system.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with the idea of bipartisanship if it means compromising on reality, allegorically.
  • The Crux counts the number of people who have died in outer space.
  • D-Brief notes that the Andromeda Galaxy has swallowed up multiple dwarf galaxies over the eons.
  • Dead Things notes the identification of the first raptor species from Southeast Asia, Siamraptor suwati.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a paper tracing the origins of interstellar comet 2/Borisov from the general area of Kruger 60.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about the privilege allowing people access to affordable dental care.
  • Gizmodo tells how Alexei Leonov survived the first spacewalk.
  • io9 looks at the remarkable new status quo for the X-Men created by Jonathan Hickman.
  • Selma Franssen at the Island Review writes about the threats facing the seabirds of the Shetlands.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at what led Richard Nixon to make so many breaks from the American consensus on China in the Cold War.
  • Language Log notes an undergraduate course at Yale using the Voynich Manuscript as an aid in the study of language.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money explains her recent experience of the socialized health care system of Israel for Americans.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how badly the Fukuyama prediction of an end to history has aged.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few maps of the new Ottawa LRT route.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper establishing a link between Chinese industries undermining their counterparts in Mexico and Mexican social ills including crime.
  • Sean Marshall reports from Ottawa about what the Confederation Line looks like.
  • Adam Shatz at the NYR Daily looks at the power of improvisation in music.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at South Williamsburg Jewish deli Gottlieb’s.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews</a the new Patti Smith book, Year of the Monkey.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking as the factors leading into transnational movements.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the question of the direction(s) in which order in the universe was generated.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a report noting the very minor flows of migration from China to Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the politics in the British riding of Keighley.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguin socks.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes new research on where the sun is located within the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the value of slow fashion.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the different gas giants that our early methods have yet to pick up.
  • Crooked Timber shares a lovely photo looking back at Venice from across its lagoon.
  • D-Brief notes that upcoming space telescopes might find hundreds of rogue planets thanks to microlensing.
  • io9 notes that Marvel will soon be producing Warhammer40K comics.
  • The Island Review shares some poetry and photography by Ken Cockburn inspired by the Isle of Jura.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that different humpback whale groups have different songs, different cultures.
  • Language Hat tries to find the meaning of the odd Soviet Yiddish word “kolvirt”.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the history of Elizabeth Warren as a law teacher.
  • Map Room Blog shares information from Google Maps about its use of data.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that in 2016, not a single child born in the United Kingdom was given the name Nigel.
  • Peter Watts talks about AI and what else he is doing.
  • The NYR Daily marked the centennial of a horrible massacre of African-Americans centered on the Arkansas community of Elaine.
  • Emily Margolis at the Planetary Society Blog looks at how the Apollo moon missions helped galvanize tourism in Florida.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money looks at the constitutional crisis in Peru.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at A Streetcar Named Desire.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at a spreadsheet revealing the distribution of PEI public servants.
  • Spacing reviews a book imagining how small communities can rebuild themselves in neoliberalism.
  • Towleroad shares the criticism of Christine and the Queens of the allegedly opportunistic use of queer culture by Taylor Swift.
  • Understanding Society considers, sociologically, the way artifacts work.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that the 70th anniversary of the foundation of the People’s Republic of China should be a day of mourning, on account of the high human toll of the PRC.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian generation of the 1970s was too small to create lasting change.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at how underwear ads can be quite sexualized.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer notes the latest news on interstellar comet 2/Borisov.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly emphasizes how every writer does need an editor.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the gas giant GJ 3512 b, half the mass of Jupiter orbiting a red dwarf star closely, is an oddly massive exoplanet.
  • Gina Schouten at Crooked Timber looks at inter-generational clashes on parenting styles.
  • D-Brief looks at the methods of agriculture that could conceivably sustain a populous human colony on Mars.
  • Bruce Dorminey argues that we on Earth need something like Starfleet Academy, to help us advance into space.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how the socio-spatial perspective helps us understand the development of cities.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res listens to the Paul McCartney album Flaming Pie.
  • io9 looks at Proxima, a contemporary spaceflight film starring Eva Green.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the intense relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia began in, and reflected, the era of Jim Crow.
  • Language Hat notes a report suggesting that multilingualism helps ward off dementia.
  • Language Log takes issue with the names of the mascots of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the emergence of a ninth woman complaining about being harassed by Al Franken.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new paper arguing that the Washington Consensus worked.
  • The NYR Daily shares an Aubrey Nolan cartoon illustrating the evacuation of war children in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane shares a nice collection of links for digital mapmakers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the European Space Agency supports the cause of planetary defense.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Kenyan writer Kevin Mwachiro at length.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on how a mysterious fast radio burst helped illuminate an equally mysterious galactic halo.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious and unsolved death in 1936 of Canadian student Thomas Moss in an Oxfordshire hayrick.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how Mount Etna is a surpassingly rare decipoint.
  • Understanding Society considers the thought of Koj√®ve, after Hegel, on freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the falling numbers of Russians, and of state support for Russian language and culture, in independent Central Asia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how individual consumer responses are much less effective than concerted collective action in triggering change.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on some transgender fashion models.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how TESS detected a star being torn apart by a distant black hole.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster looks at the past and future of the blog.
  • Crooked Timber takes on the sensitive issue of private schools in the United Kingdom.
  • The Crux considers the question of why women suffer from Alzheimer’s at a higher frequency than men.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting that saving the oceans of the Earth could reduce the effects of global warming by 20%.
  • Bruce Dorminey considers a paper suggesting that, if not for its volcanic resurfacing, Venus could have remained an Earth-like world to this day.
  • The Dragon’s Tale notes that NASA will deploy a cubesat in the proposed orbit of the Lunar Gateway station to make sure it is a workable orbit.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at Soyuz T-10a, the first crewed mission to abort on the launch pad.
  • Gizmodo reports on a paper arguing that we should intentionally contaminate Mars (and other bodies?) with our world’s microbes.
  • io9 looks at how Warner Brothers is trying to control, belatedly, the discourse around the new Joker movie.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how, in industrializing London, women kidnapped children off the streets.
  • Language Hat links to a page examining the Arabic and Islamic elements in Dune.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at a new documentary examining the life of Trump mentor Roy Cohn.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how BBC protocols are preventing full discussion of public racism.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at different efforts to reimagining the subway map of New York City.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper claiming that increased pressure on immigrants to assimilate in Italy had positive results.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the background to George Washington’s statements about the rightful place of Jews in the United States.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the political explanation of the massive increase in the planetary defense budget of NASA.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the Rocky Horror Show, with its celebration of sexuality (among other things).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers why there are so many unexpected black holes in the universe.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps examines why Google Street View is not present in Germany (and Austria).
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a ruling in a UK court that lying about a vasectomy negates a partner’s consent to sex.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the controversy about some Buryat intellectuals about giving the different dialects of their language too much importance.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Citizen Science Salon highlights Australian Michelle Neil, here.
  • Ingrid Robeyns argues at Crooked Timber that the idea of punitive taxation of the superrich is hardly blasphemous.
  • The Crux looks at the ongoing debate over the age of the rings of Saturn.
  • io9 notes the sad death of Aron Eisenberg, the actor who brought the character of Nog to life on DS9.
  • JSTOR Daily shares a debate on the ego and the id, eighty years later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Mitch McConnell may have started the movement of Elizabeth Warren towards the US presidency.
  • The Map Room Blog takes a look at the credible and consistent mapping of Star Wars’ galaxy.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Springsteen at 70 as a performer.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photo of a New England forest in fall.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes a sticker that straddles the line between anti-Muslim sentiment and misogyny, trying to force people to choose.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the strong anti-Russian sentiment prevailing in once-independent Tuva.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Architectuul profiles architectural photographer Lorenzo Zandri, here.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes a new study suggesting red dwarf stars, by far the most common stars in the universe, have plenty of planets.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares 11 tips for interviewers, reminding me of what I did for anthropology fieldwork.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how water ice ejected from Enceladus makes the inner moons of Saturn brilliant.
  • The Crux looks at the increasingly complicated question of when the first humans reached North America.
  • D-Brief notes a new discovery suggesting the hearts of humans, unlike the hearts of other closely related primates, evolved to require endurance activities to remain healthy.
  • Dangerous Minds shares with its readers the overlooked 1969 satire Putney Swope.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that the WFIRST infrared telescope has passed its first design review.
  • Gizmodo notes how drought in Spain has revealed the megalithic Dolmen of Guadalperal for the first time in six decades.
  • io9 looks at the amazing Jonathan Hickman run on the X-Men so far, one that has established the mutants as eye-catching and deeply alien.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Pentagon has admitted that 2017 UFO videos do, in fact, depict some unidentified objects in the air.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the origin of the equestrian horseback statue in ancient Rome.
  • Language Log shares a bilingual English/German pun from Berlin.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on the legacy of Thomas Jefferson at Jefferson’s grave.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution looks at a new book arguing, contra Pinker perhaps, that the modern era is one of heightened violence.
  • The New APPS Blog seeks to reconcile the philosophy of Hobbes with that of Foucault on biopower.
  • Strange Company shares news clippings from 1970s Ohio about a pesky UFO.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the idea of shooting garbage from Earth into the sun does not work.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps explains the appearance of Brasilia on a 1920s German map: It turns out the capital was nearly realized then.
  • Towleroad notes that Pete Buttigieg has taken to avoiding reading LGBTQ media because he dislikes their criticism of his gayness.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at diners and changing menus and slavery.