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Archive for the ‘Science’ Category

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Stepgate to Emanuel Jaques to mass transit

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    Torontoist’s feature on how Stepgate went viral internationally is a mustread.

  • The National Post covers a disturbing report about claiming a police officer maimed a teenager. If the Toronto police have been actively trying to cover up criminal assault by one of their members …
  • Global News notes that Metrolinx has opted to remove Bombardier for consideration in operating GO Transit.
  • A high-speed ferry link between Toronto and Niagara–St. Catherine’s–is imaginable. Economically viable? The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Simon Lewsen describes in The Globe and Mail how the 1977 murder of Emanuel Jaques led, eventually, to the transformation of Yonge Street.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers the question of what, exactly, is the genre of ethnographic film.
  • Centauri Dreams features authors’ calls for a debate on METI, on sending messages to extraterrestrial intelligences.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing damage caused by the continuing eruptions of Indonesia’s mud volcano, Sidoarjo.
  • Imageo shares a cute time-lapse video from Hubble showing the motion of Phobos around Mars.
  • Language Hat responds to a newly-translated mid-19th century Russian novella, Nadezhda Khvoshchinskaya‘s 1861 novella Пансионерка (The Boarding School Girl).
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has a depressing extended examination of Trump as reflecting structural crisis in the United States.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the genesis and continuing success of Nicaraguan Sign Language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a satirical map of Washington D.C., defined by the names that its metro stations should have.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang lists the various worlds in our Solar System possibly hosting life, and notes how you could get an Earth-like world with wildly erratic seasons as in Game of Thrones.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that the German president has signed marriage equality into law. (Also, the country has good LGBT protections.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Putin is fine with an asymmetrical bilingualism in Russia’s republics, aimed against non-Russian languages.

[CAT] Three cat links, on indoor/outdoor and leashes and a Hong Kong prison, even

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  • In The Globe and Mail, Elizabeth Renzetti looks at the Toronto debate on having cats indoors or outdoors. (I think the first is best.)
  • Helena Oliveira at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution describes how people can train their cats to make use of leashes. (Should I have?)
  • The SCMP reports on a Hong Kong prison that will allow inmates to keep cats, for the time being.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 22, 2017 at 3:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum takes a look at how surfing has been commodified.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the stellar occultation that has revealed information about MU69, the next New Horizons target.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin takes issue with Mélenchon’s take on anti-Semitism and the French role in the Holocaust.
  • D-Brief notes that we really are not good at detecting faked photos.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage photos of strippers from the 1960s.
  • Michael Sacasas of The Frailest Things looks, again, at the technologically enchanted world.
  • Language Log takes issue with the dismissive treatment of “… in a woodpile.” The expression is poison.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the dual position of the camel among the Sahrawi, as wild and tame at once.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the problems of neuroscience, statistically.
  • The NYR Daily considers the hacking of the American vote. Who did it? Who gained?
  • Science Sushi notes that climate change threats African wild dogs’ survival.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Armenian argument that Russia lacks the soft power that the Soviet Union once enjoyed.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • James Bow considers the idea of Christian privilege.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the oddities of Ross 128.
  • D-Brief shares Matthew Buckley’s proposal that it is possible to make planets out of dark matter.
  • Dead Things reports on the discoveries at Madjedbebe, in northern Australia, suggesting humans arrived 65 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on the idea that advanced civilizations may use sunshades to protect their worlds from overheating. (For terraforming purposes, too.)
  • Language Hat notes the struggles of some Scots in coming up with a rationalized spelling for Scots. What of “hert”?
  • The LRB Blog considers the way in which the unlimited power of Henry VIII will be recapitulated post-Brexit by the UK government.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes the High Park production of King Lear.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the idea that Pluto’s moons, including Charon, might be legacies of a giant impact.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the terrible anti-trans “Civil Rights Uniformity Act.” Americans, please act.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers/u> the perhaps-unique way a sitting American president might be charged with obstruction of justice.

[NEWS] Seven links, from drugs in Germany to dolphin cuisine to dual nations in Australia

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  • Johann Hari writes for Open Democracy about what may be the beginning of the end of the drug war in Germany.
  • I am not in agreement with Joseph Couture’s argument in NOW Toronto that the Internet has ended gay communities. (Convince me.)
  • Samantha Edwards reports in NOW Toronto controversy regarding the Parkdale feminist street art event. Was it really intersectional?
  • James Cooray Smith wonders–or “wonders”–why some Doctor Who fans are so upset with a woman portraying the Doctor.
  • In MacLean’s, chief Perry Bellegarde argues that more Canadians should be concerned with the too-many deaths of young First Nations people in Thunder Bay.
  • The National Post tells the story of how Australian senator Larissa Walters had to unexpectedly resign her position on account of her Canadian birth.
  • Via James Nicoll, a paper claiming evidence of human presence in northern Australia, in Madjedbebe, 65k years ago.
  • National Geographic tells of the peculiar way some Gulf of Mexico dolphins prepare their catfish. Is it cultural, culinary even?

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Charley Ross notes the belated recovery and identification of Margret Dodd, four decades after her abduction and more than two after her body was found.
  • D-Brief notes that the Pale Red Dot is extending their exoplanet search from Proxima Centauri to include Barnard’s Star and Ross 154.
  • Dangerous Minds shares colour autochromes of American women from a century ago.
  • Gizmodo notes more evidence suggesting Mars’ moons, Phobos and Deimos, are legacies of a massive Mars impact.
  • The LRB Blog looks back at the 1951 “Festival of Britain”.
  • Roads and Kingdoms’ Karen Dias looks at a girls’ soccer team in Haryana, north India.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a sketch of some of the work being done at Province House.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at the timeline for Russian influence on the Trump campaign.
  • Window on Eurasia comes to worrying conclusions about ethnic conflict in Daghestan.