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Archive for the ‘Science’ Category

[NEWS] Five First Nations links: NunatuKavut, Spadina, Arctic education, Gwich’in food, Haida manga

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  • The Canadian federal government is moving to recognize the Inuit of NunatuKavut, in southern Labrador. Global News reports.
  • I wish I had seen this billboard downtown on Spadina Avenue. CBC reports on this indigenous anti-racism initiative.
  • Creating Arctic universities with services catering to each of the three northern territories would have positive implications for education, not least among native groups. Global News reports.
  • The Discourse reports on how, for the Gwich’in of the Northwest Territories, turning to native foodstuffs is not only key to cultural revival but also the only economically viably way they have to eat.
  • At The Conversation, Marie Mauzé takes a look at the innovative Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas and his creation of the new artform of “Haida manga”.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new image showing the sheer density of events in the core of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of 2MASS 0249 c, a planet-like object that distantly orbits a pair of low-mass brown dwarfs.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of many new moons of Jupiter, bringing the total up to 79.
  • Far Outliers looks at the appeasement practiced by the Times of London in the 1930s.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas contrasts roots with anchors.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the controversy surrounding surviving honours paid to Franco in Spain.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how the question of Macedonia continues to be a threatening issue in the politics of Greece.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests the new Mexican president is trying to create a new political machine, one that can only echo the more far-reaching and unrestrained one of PRI.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at the shifting alliances of different Asian countries with China and the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the Russian reactions to a recent Politico Europe report describing Estonia’s strategies for resisting a Russian invasion in depth.

[NEWS] Links on oceans near and far: mental health, Salton Sea, Europa, Enceladus, Pluto

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  • There definitely is something to the idea that oceans, and other large bodies of water, can be healing. The immenseness of Lake Ontario (to name one body) is sublime. Global News reports on one study.
  • The scale of the disaster in California’s Salton Sea, drying up and poisoning the nearby land, is appalling. The Verge shows the scene.
  • NASA notes one mechanism for the gradual recycling of the ocean of Europa, up into its outer icy crust. Universe Today reports.
  • Some Earth bacteria could thrive in the predicted environment of Enceladus. Universe Today reports.
  • Cold environments still watery thanks to substantial amounts of brine could support life, conceivably on worlds as distant as Pluto. Universe Today reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 17, 2018 at 8:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares the latest images of asteroid Ryugu.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the equal-mass near-Earth asteroid binary 2017 YE5.
  • Far Outliers notes how corrosive fake news and propaganda can be, by looking at Orwell’s experience of the Spanish Civil War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas looks at swarms versus networks, in the light of Bauman’s thinking on freedom/security.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on how American pharmacy chain PVS fired a man–a Log Cabin Republican, no less–for calling the police on a black customer over a coupon.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper making the case that national service plays a useful role in modern countries.
  • Language Hat quotes from a beautiful Perry Anderson essay at the LRB about Proust.
  • Jeffey Herlihy-Mera writes/u> at Lingua Franca about his first-hand experiences of the multilingualism of Ecuador.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art created by the prominent members of the Romanov dynasty.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer has reposted a blog post from 2016 considering the question of just how much money the United States could extract, via military basing, from Germany and Japan and South Korea
  • Window on Eurasia suggests a new Russian language law that would marginalize non-Russian languages is provoking a renaissance of Tatar nationalism.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: Arctic, floating, cemeteries, wildlife, immigrants

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  • Wired noted how Arctic cities were facing significant problems from melting permafrost, and how they were trying to deal with this threat.
  • CityLab notes the ever-popular idea of a floating city, riding the waves.
  • Atlas Obscura notes, unsurprisingly, that some cemeteries in the United States were used as parks. Why not? These can be lovely green spaces. Just look at Toronto’s Mount Pleasant and Prospect cemeteries.
  • In a feature on Menno Schilthuizen’s Darwin Comes to Town, Simon Worrall at National Geographic looks at the many and varied ways wildlife can adapt to city life.
  • Melissa Byrnes, at Lawyers, Guns and Money, noted how Trump’s rhetoric of ICE “liberating” American communities echoed ways in which French authorities in the Algerian war militarized immigrant neighbourhoods.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen argues compellingly that stories featuring queer protagonists should also have other queer characters (among other things).
  • James Bow talks about the origins and the progress of his new novel, The Sun Runners.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the recent hopeful analysis of Ross 128b, still a strong candidate for a relatively Earth-like world.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion on having elections in the European Parliament being based on transnational lists.
  • D-Brief notes a hauntingly musical study of the plasma of Saturn’s ring system.
  • Hornet Stories reports on N.K. Jemisin’s article that bigots are not good writers of fiction. I’m inclined to agree: People who cannot imagine the lives of others as legitimate have issues with plausible characterization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Nicola Sturgeon opened Pride in Glasgow on the same day as Trump’s visit, saying there was where she wanted to be regardless.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the winding history of New York State’s Adirondacks, as a protected area.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the evidence for the unwitting involvement of Glenn Greenwald and Wikileaks as agents of Russia in support of Trump.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, considers the genesis of the phrase “Sherpas of the Beltway.” How problematic is it?
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that Canadian public opinion in support of open immigration rests on borders being controlled.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the strange behaviour of Boyajian’s Star can be explained by dust alone.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates that Russia might be on the verge of another wave of regional reorganizations, amalgamating some provinces and other territories into others.
  • Arnold Zwicky points out the achievements of Samantha Allen, a journalist writing for The Daily Beast.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Architectuul has an extended long interview with architect Dragoljub Bakić, talking about the innovative architecture of Tito’s Yugoslavia and his experiences abroad.
  • Centauri Dreams remarks on how the new maps of Pluto can evoke the worlds of Ray Bradbury.
  • The Crux answers an interesting question: What, exactly, is a blazar?
  • D-Brief links to a study suggesting that conditions on Ross 128 b, the second-nearest potentially habitable planet, are potentially (very broadly) Earth-like.
  • Dangerous Minds shows how John Mellencamp was, in the 1970s, once a glam rocker.
  • The Finger Post shares photos from a recent visit to Naypyidaw, the very new capital of Myanmar.
  • Gizmodo explains how the detection of an energetic neutrino led to the detection of a distant blazar, marking yet another step forward for multi-messenger astronomy.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the now-overlooked writer of supernatural fiction Vernon Lee.
  • Language Log makes an argument that acquiring fluency in Chinese language, including Chinese writing, is difficult, so difficult perhaps as to displace other cultures. Thoughts?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that the decline of the neo-liberal world order is needed. My main concern is that neo-liberalism may well be the least bad of the potential world orders out there.
  • Lingua Franca takes a look at how Hindi and Urdu, technically separate languages, actually form two poles of a Hindustani language continuum.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a unique map of the London Underground that shows the elevation of each station.
  • Rocky Planet notes that the continuing eruption of Kilauea is going to permanently shape the lives of the people of the Big Island of Hawai’i.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Buddhists of Kalmykia want the Russian government to permit a visit by the Dalai Lama to their republic.
  • Writing at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Livio Di Matteo notes that the Trump demand NATO governments spend 4% of their GDP on defense would involve unprecedented levels of spending in Canada.