A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Archive for the ‘History’ Category

[NEWS] Five First Nations links: NunatuKavut, Spadina, Arctic education, Gwich’in food, Haida manga

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  • The Canadian federal government is moving to recognize the Inuit of NunatuKavut, in southern Labrador. Global News reports.
  • I wish I had seen this billboard downtown on Spadina Avenue. CBC reports on this indigenous anti-racism initiative.
  • Creating Arctic universities with services catering to each of the three northern territories would have positive implications for education, not least among native groups. Global News reports.
  • The Discourse reports on how, for the Gwich’in of the Northwest Territories, turning to native foodstuffs is not only key to cultural revival but also the only economically viably way they have to eat.
  • At The Conversation, Marie MauzĂ© takes a look at the innovative Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas and his creation of the new artform of “Haida manga”.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Amazon Prime, Skyscraper, inclusionary zoning, waterfront, underground

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  • Andray Domise at MacLean’s takes Amazon Prime Day to note the way in which the tech company and others are undermining successful cities.
  • CityLab is unimpressed by the new movie Skyscraper, not least for the opportunities it fails to recognize in the architecture of super-tall buildings.
  • CityLab takes a look at the idea of “inclusionary zoning”, here.
  • Guardian Cities notes that Toronto is not alone in making the mistake of building highways separating city from waterfront.
  • The Guardian Cities takes a fascinating extended look at the questions of mapping and property ownership of the space beneath cities.

[URBAN NOTE] TTC Line 1, Dufferin Street, Bloordale, #TheManWhoSoldParkdale, PR voting

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  • blogTO notes a closure this weekend of Line 1 between St. Clair and Lawrence for Metrolinx construction. Still, at least their post uses my photo!
  • Urban Toronto notes that, the studios at 390 through 444 Dufferin Street being demolished, new construction is begin. I remember those studios from when I first moved to Toronto.
  • Urban Toronto looks at the latest revision to plans to redevelop the southwest corner of Bloor and Dufferin, one intended to install a more human scale to the streetscape and skyline.
  • NOW Toronto takes an extended look at the #TheManWhoSoldParkdale campaign against gentrification in Parkdale.
  • CBC shares the argument in favour of giving permanent residents voting rights in municipal elections in the City of Toronto.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new image showing the sheer density of events in the core of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of 2MASS 0249 c, a planet-like object that distantly orbits a pair of low-mass brown dwarfs.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of many new moons of Jupiter, bringing the total up to 79.
  • Far Outliers looks at the appeasement practiced by the Times of London in the 1930s.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas contrasts roots with anchors.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the controversy surrounding surviving honours paid to Franco in Spain.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how the question of Macedonia continues to be a threatening issue in the politics of Greece.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests the new Mexican president is trying to create a new political machine, one that can only echo the more far-reaching and unrestrained one of PRI.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at the shifting alliances of different Asian countries with China and the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the Russian reactions to a recent Politico Europe report describing Estonia’s strategies for resisting a Russian invasion in depth.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: One Yonge, park budget, Berczy Park, cyclists, Soulpepper Theatre

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  • Urban Toronto reports on the massive towers being planned for One Yonge Street.
  • The City of Toronto has massive shortfalls in its budget for park repairs. The city is unprepared for (as an example) a recurrence of 2017’s flooding. CBC reports.
  • If there is dead grass at Berczy Park, the dogs the park is dedicated to can be fairly blamed for this. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Rehana Mushtaq, writing at The Varsity, is right in arguing for a shift in the culture of transportation, for the benefit of cyclists.
  • Toronto’s Soulpepper Theatre, in the wake of allegations of inappropriate behaviour, is shaking up its training program. CBC reports.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares the latest images of asteroid Ryugu.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the equal-mass near-Earth asteroid binary 2017 YE5.
  • Far Outliers notes how corrosive fake news and propaganda can be, by looking at Orwell’s experience of the Spanish Civil War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas looks at swarms versus networks, in the light of Bauman’s thinking on freedom/security.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on how American pharmacy chain PVS fired a man–a Log Cabin Republican, no less–for calling the police on a black customer over a coupon.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper making the case that national service plays a useful role in modern countries.
  • Language Hat quotes from a beautiful Perry Anderson essay at the LRB about Proust.
  • Jeffey Herlihy-Mera writes/u> at Lingua Franca about his first-hand experiences of the multilingualism of Ecuador.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art created by the prominent members of the Romanov dynasty.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer has reposted a blog post from 2016 considering the question of just how much money the United States could extract, via military basing, from Germany and Japan and South Korea
  • Window on Eurasia suggests a new Russian language law that would marginalize non-Russian languages is provoking a renaissance of Tatar nationalism.

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about cities: Arctic, floating, cemeteries, wildlife, immigrants

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  • Wired noted how Arctic cities were facing significant problems from melting permafrost, and how they were trying to deal with this threat.
  • CityLab notes the ever-popular idea of a floating city, riding the waves.
  • Atlas Obscura notes, unsurprisingly, that some cemeteries in the United States were used as parks. Why not? These can be lovely green spaces. Just look at Toronto’s Mount Pleasant and Prospect cemeteries.
  • In a feature on Menno Schilthuizen’s Darwin Comes to Town, Simon Worrall at National Geographic looks at the many and varied ways wildlife can adapt to city life.
  • Melissa Byrnes, at Lawyers, Guns and Money, noted how Trump’s rhetoric of ICE “liberating” American communities echoed ways in which French authorities in the Algerian war militarized immigrant neighbourhoods.