A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Archive for the ‘History’ Category

[ISL] Three notes on Prince Edward Island, changing and otherwise

leave a comment »

  • CBC Prince Edward Island notes that, although down from its 1999 peak, PEI is still Canada’s top potato producer.
  • Strong demand and limited supply means that the Island’s real estate market is tight, with rising prices. CBC Prince Edward Island reports.
  • Meagan Campbell writes in MacLean’s about two of the Island’s newest migrant groups, Amish from Ontario and Buddhist monks from East Asia.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from Stepgate to Emanuel Jaques to mass transit

leave a comment »

    Torontoist’s feature on how Stepgate went viral internationally is a mustread.

  • The National Post covers a disturbing report about claiming a police officer maimed a teenager. If the Toronto police have been actively trying to cover up criminal assault by one of their members …
  • Global News notes that Metrolinx has opted to remove Bombardier for consideration in operating GO Transit.
  • A high-speed ferry link between Toronto and Niagara–St. Catherine’s–is imaginable. Economically viable? The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Simon Lewsen describes in The Globe and Mail how the 1977 murder of Emanuel Jaques led, eventually, to the transformation of Yonge Street.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

leave a comment »

  • Anthrodendum considers the question of what, exactly, is the genre of ethnographic film.
  • Centauri Dreams features authors’ calls for a debate on METI, on sending messages to extraterrestrial intelligences.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing damage caused by the continuing eruptions of Indonesia’s mud volcano, Sidoarjo.
  • Imageo shares a cute time-lapse video from Hubble showing the motion of Phobos around Mars.
  • Language Hat responds to a newly-translated mid-19th century Russian novella, Nadezhda Khvoshchinskaya‘s 1861 novella Пансионерка (The Boarding School Girl).
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has a depressing extended examination of Trump as reflecting structural crisis in the United States.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the genesis and continuing success of Nicaraguan Sign Language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a satirical map of Washington D.C., defined by the names that its metro stations should have.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang lists the various worlds in our Solar System possibly hosting life, and notes how you could get an Earth-like world with wildly erratic seasons as in Game of Thrones.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that the German president has signed marriage equality into law. (Also, the country has good LGBT protections.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Putin is fine with an asymmetrical bilingualism in Russia’s republics, aimed against non-Russian languages.

[NEWS] Five links about Canada, from #Canada150 travel to cultural visibilities

leave a comment »

  • In The Globe and Mail, Ian Brown and Nam Phi Dang’s photo essay tracking the adventures of a bus of Chinese tourists who went from Toronto to the Island and back is insightful and amusing.
  • Alex Ballingall’s account in the Toronto Star of his week-long trek along the Trans-Canada Trail from Niagara to Toronto is enlightening. Would I could do this …
  • Mark Milke in MacLean’s argues that, regrettable excesses aside, Canadians should be proud of our British heritage.
  • The Montreal Gazette‘s Brendan Kelly wonders why a supposedly Canadian music compilation does not include any French-language songs.
  • In the Toronto Star, Emma Teitel points out that visibility, including corporate visibility, is hugely important in Pride.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

leave a comment »

  • Anthrodendum takes a look at how surfing has been commodified.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the stellar occultation that has revealed information about MU69, the next New Horizons target.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin takes issue with Mélenchon’s take on anti-Semitism and the French role in the Holocaust.
  • D-Brief notes that we really are not good at detecting faked photos.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage photos of strippers from the 1960s.
  • Michael Sacasas of The Frailest Things looks, again, at the technologically enchanted world.
  • Language Log takes issue with the dismissive treatment of “… in a woodpile.” The expression is poison.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the dual position of the camel among the Sahrawi, as wild and tame at once.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the problems of neuroscience, statistically.
  • The NYR Daily considers the hacking of the American vote. Who did it? Who gained?
  • Science Sushi notes that climate change threats African wild dogs’ survival.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Armenian argument that Russia lacks the soft power that the Soviet Union once enjoyed.

[PHOTO] Four photo links: the perils of Instagram, doctored photos, pre-AIDS NYC and the Rust Belt

leave a comment »

  • I have limits as to what I will do to get a great photo. The limits of others may be more elastic, too much so even. VICE warns against this excessive dangerous.
  • Lifehacker shares some quick tips to people looking for obvious signs of a photograph being doctored.
  • These obviously NSFW photos from pre-AIDS New York City by Alvin Baltrop capture the ephemeral scene beautifully.
  • Niko Kallianiotis’ photos of small-town Rust Belt Pennsylvania are evocative. I recognize this kind of landscape.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 20, 2017 at 6:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five links on Toronto, from housing issues to renaming Ryerson

leave a comment »

  • blogTO notes apartment complexes will soon be rezoned to allow them to host more businesses.
  • Torontoist’s Tamara Yelland argues against Matt Gurney’s dismissive take that people who can’t afford Toronto housing should go.
  • Global News reports on the bidding wars for condo rentals in Toronto.
  • At CBC, Doug George-Kanentiio argues in favour of renaming Ryerson University, perhaps giving it a First Nations name.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Martin Regg Cohn reflects on his experiences around the world, seeing statues to past regimes taken down.