A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Archive for the ‘History’ Category

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: street art, journalism, police, Cheri DiNovo, transit at Dundas West

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  • CBC notes that the Yonge and Dundas street artist scene is closing down under city regulations, including permits.
  • Emily Mathieu talks about how she conducts her journalism with some of Toronto’s most marginalized as subjects.
  • The Globe and Mail notes the local controversy over having police officers permanently stationed in schools.
  • The idea that police who actively undermine the Special Investigations Unit should be seriously punished seems obvious.
  • Veteran NDP politican and LGBTQ rights advocate Cheri DiNovo is leaving politics to become a minister in church.
  • Finally, the Dundas West TTC station will be connected to the GO Transit hub less than 300 metres away!
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[NEWS] Five notes about things splitting apart: Catalonia, First Nations, Brexit, NAFTA, Iceland

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  • If the separatists of Catalonia are triggering a confrontation with the Spanish government to create a majority … Open Democracy reports.
  • Speaking as someone who could be classified as a settler himself, positioning myself and my arguments is key. MacLean’s notes the importance of sensitivity to First Nations issues.
  • The United Kingdom does seem likely to get the selective access to the EU’s markets post-Brexit some want. Bloomberg reports.
  • Expensive avocado exports are but some of the complications that could hit North America if NAFTA gets changed. Bloomberg reports.
  • Iceland, again, is displaying particular caution towards potentially overwhelming Chinese investment projects. Bloomberg reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.

[NEWS] Four pop culture links: Moana and Maori pride, gay bookstores, a fake German beach, gay Trek

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  • io9 has an interesting article looking at how the success of Disney’s film Moana is driving Maori pride in New Zealand.
  • New Now Next lists eight of the top LGBTQ bookstores of North America and Europe, including Toronto’s Glad Day.
  • 24 hours on an artificial beach, sheltered under a hanger deep in east Germany, turns out to be quite fulfilling. VICE reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes that Star Trek: Discovery is a belated attempt to catch up with LGBTQ presence in pop culture.

[NEWS] Five science and technology links: Darjeeling tea, Fitbits, cannabis, PrEP, Planet Nine

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  • Climate change is making the famous tea of Darjeeling much more difficult to come by. VICE reports.
  • Wired notes Fitbits are useful tracking devices for scientists engaged in studies, too. (I always wear mine.)
  • I entirely approve of this new Niagara College program. Why not legalize and professionalize cannabis agriculture?
  • This VICE interview with bringing the Truvada needed for inexpensive PrEP across the border into Canada is of note.
  • A new study suggests that Planet Nine, if it exists, was likely not captured by the young sun but formed here. Universe Today reports.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.
  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of “The Ballad of the Green Berets”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

[NEWS] Four environment links: disasters, Tibetan soil flowing, lobsters, flooding

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  • Naomi Klein argues that this summer, of wildfires and disasters, marks an environmental turning point.
  • National Geographic shares stunning video of defrosting Tibetan soil flowing.
  • This dumping of illegally harvested lobsters as garbage on land in Nova Scotia is a terrible waste. CBC reports.
  • Can we limit urban flooding only if we force landowners to contribute to the costs of stormwater infrastructure? MacLean’s makes the case.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 19, 2017 at 10:45 pm