A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘journalism

[NEWS] Six links on journalism in Canada: Québec, Halifax, PEI, Guelph …

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  • La Presse carries the concern of a Québec journalist that the decline of daily papers could have a catastrophic impact on the province’s culture.
  • The Québec government would like financially-stressed newspaper group to form a coop. CTV News reports.
  • That the Toronto Star shut down its free Metro affiliates across Canada made the news in Halifax. CBC reports.
  • The closure of the Transcontinental Media printing plant in Borden-Carleton means that PEI no longer has a local printer for its media. CBC reports.
  • Sabrina Wilkinson writes at The Conversation about the increasingly tenuous nature of journalism in Canada, not least as an employer.
  • This Alex Migdal piece looks at how Guelph, Ontario, has fared since the closure of the Guelph Mercury daily.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Montréal links

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  • The Map Room Blog links to some old maps of Montréal.
  • Major English-language newspapers in Montréal, including the Montreal Gazette, are no longer being distributed to Québec City clients. CBC reports.
  • Radio-Canada employees’ union is concerned over cost overruns in the construction of a new headquarters for the French-language chain. CTV NEws reports.
  • La Presse notes how the to-be-demolished Champlain Bridge is a home for, among others, falcons.
  • The Bibliothèque Saint-Sulpice, after the latest delay, will have been closed for nearly two decades. La Presse reports.
  • The Montreal Children’s Library is celebrating its 90th anniversary with a fundraiser. CBC reports.
  • CBC Montreal looks at how, even without a stadium, legendary mayor Jean Drapeau brought major league baseball to his city.
  • The anti-gentrification University of the Streets group has some interesting ideas. CBC reports.
  • The city government of Montréal is looking into the issue of the high retail vacancy rates in parts of the city. CBC reports.
  • At CBC Montreal, Ontario-born Jessica Brown writes about her struggles with employment in her adopted city.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links

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  • NOW Toronto reports on the long-time independent weekly’s sale to a venture capital firm, here.
  • The Yonge-Eglinton Centre now hosts a venue where people can nap in peace. Toronto Life has photos, here.
  • The family of North York van attack victim Anne-Marie D’Amico hopes to raise one million dollars for a women’s shelter. The National Post reports.
  • Toronto Community Housing, after a terrible accident, has banned its tenants from having window air conditioners. Global News reports.
  • blogTO reports on the ridiculous heights to which surge pricing took ride fares on Uber and Lyft during yesterday morning’s shutdown.
  • blogTO notes that the Ontario government has provided funding to study the idea of extension of the Eglinton Crosstown west to Pearson Airport.

[URBAN NOTE] Eight Toronto links

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  • blogTO notes the strange house, a fantasia inspired by Greece, at 1016 Shaw Street.
  • blogTO shares photos from inside Paradise Theatre on Bloor, reopened after 13 years.
  • blogTO notes that GO Transit will now be offering customers unlimited rides on Sundays for just $C 10.
  • Photos of infamous Toronto chair girl Marcella Zoia celebrating her 20th birthday are up at blogTO, here.
  • Many residents displaced by the Gosford fire in North York have been moved to hotels. Global News reports.
  • A TTC worker has launched a court case against the TTC and city of Toronto over issues of air quality. Global News reports.
  • Jamie Bradburn reports on how the Toronto press covered the opening of the Suez Canal, here.
  • Transit Toronto explains what, exactly, workers are building at Eglinton station and Yonge and Eglinton more generally.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links

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  • John Lorinc at Spacing considers the complication idea of a city charter for Toronto. Is it worth it? Does it ignore other governance issues?
  • Tourism is booming in Toronto, transforming the economy of the metropolis. The Toronto Star reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes how the Toronto District School Board is introducing educational courses intended to prepare students for careers in hospitality.
  • Legal controversy surrounding the governance of Mount Pleasant Cemetery, and other like cemeteries in Toronto, is ongoing. The Toronto Star reports.
  • In Milton, the owner of an illegal rooming house where one tenant died has been found financially liable. CBC reports.
  • The Toronto Star tells the story of soldiers returning from the First World War who attacked Chinatown and its inhabitants, here.
  • NOW Toronto points to an exhibition of photos created in solidarity with Hong Kong journalists.

[NEWS] Five NYR Daily links: Colombia, slavery, churches, journalism, Shakespeare&Co (@nyr_daily)

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  • The NYR Daily shares a report from Colombia, about the ways in which the filling of the Hidroituango Dam interacts with Colombia’s other social and political issues, here.
  • Sean Wilentz makes the compelling argument at the NYR Daily that the young United States was a critical venue for antislavery movements, here.
  • The NYR Daily tells the stories of two churches, one white and one black, as they merge, here.
  • The NYR Daily shares the stories of a half-dozen pioneering, but overlooked, black woman journalists in the United States, here.
  • Caitlin O’Keefe tells at the NYR Daily of how Paris bookstore Shakespeare and Company played a key role in the growth of feminism, here.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how a photo of the Large Magellanic Cloud makes him recognize it as an irregular spiral, not a blob.
  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the life of cosmonaut Alexei Leonov.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with one particular claim about the benefits of war and empire.
  • The Crux looks at fatal familial insomnia, a genetic disease that kills through inflicting sleeplessness on its victims.
  • D-Brief looks at suggestions that magnetars are formed by the collisions of stars.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to the fantasy art of Arthur Rackham.
  • Cody Delistraty considers some evidence suggesting that plants have a particular kind of intelligence.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the expansion by Russia of its airbase in Hneymim, Syria.
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about the critical and changing position of libraries as public spaces in our cities.
  • Gizmodo looks at one marvelous way scientists have found to cheat quantum mechanics.
  • Information is Beautiful outlines a sensible proposal to state to cultivate seaweed a as source of food and fuel.
  • io9 notes that, in the exciting new X-Men relaunch, immortal Moira MacTaggart is getting her own solo book.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the now-defunct Thomas Cook travel agency played a role in supporting British imperialism, back in the day.
  • Language Log notes that the Oxford English Dictionary is citing the blog on the use of “their” as a singular.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the grounds for impeaching Donald Trump.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the politics of Mozambique at the country approaches dangerous times.
  • Sean Marshall notes the southern Ontario roads that run to Paris and to London.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a problematic scientific study that tried to use rabbits to study the female human orgasm.
  • Steve Baker at The Numerati looks at a new book on journalism by veteran Peter Copeland.
  • The NYR Daily makes the point that depending on biomass as a green energy solution is foolish.
  • The Planetary Science Blog notes a 1983 letter by then-president Carl Sagan calling for a NASA mission to Saturn and Titan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews photojournalist Eduardo Leal on his home city of Porto, particularly as transformed by tourism.
  • Drew Rowsome notes the book Dreamland, an examination of the early amusement park.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper considering, in broad detail, how the consequence of population aging could be mitigated in the labour market of the European Union.
  • Strange Company reports on a bizarre poltergeist in a British garden shed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the new strength of a civic national identity in Kazakhstan, based on extensive polling.
  • Arnold Zwicky, surely as qualified a linguist as any, examines current verb of the American moment, “depose”.