A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘journalism

[NEWS] Five links about queer culture, from our history to our presence today

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  • As VICE notes, it is terribly frustrating that we still have to fight to make sure others do not lie about our queer lives.
  • Julia Carpenter at the Washington Post tells of “Lisa Ben”, the Hollywood secretary who started a periodical for lesbians back in 1949.
  • VICE tells the story of how a young man from Fort McMurray became the Fringe-headlining drag star Beardoncé.
  • There is something to Jason Chen’s article at The Cut praising the idea of the GLBTQ-themed book club as a venue.
  • Brandon Taylor’s Lithub essay arguing that queer literature must represent the extremes of queer experiences moves me.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her vacation in Croatia’s Istria.
  • Centauri Dreams highlights the work of citizen scientists who are producing stunning images of Jupiter through Juno data.
  • Cody Delistraty examines the unique history of Paris’ Maison de Verre, a house made entirely of glass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a recent study suggesting red dwarfs tend to produce stellar winds stripping exo-Earths of their atmospheres.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the mechanics of press censorship in a changing Burma.
  • Language Log’s Geoff Nunberg points out that the phrase “… in the woodpile” is indelibly marked with racism.
  • The NYR Daily remembers the life and notes the death of Xiu Liaobo.
  • Pamela MacNaughtan at Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of how she found the perfect lobster roll on the Iles-de-la-Madeleine.
  • The Signal shares a provocative discussion on the potential role and future decipherability of the emoji in language.
  • Towleroad shares a comforting legal analysis suggesting that marriage equality is not yet threatened in the United States.
  • Transit Toronto notes another weekend subway shutdown, this time on the Bloor line west from Ossington.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that this year will be critical for Russia’s future relationship with Tatarstan.
  • Unicorn Booty largely approves, as do I, of the controversial recent Teen Vogue guide to anal sex. Safe sex is informed sex.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the purple-heavy gardens of his neighbourhood in California.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence that pitted terrain, as found on Ceres and Vesta, indicates subsurface ice.
  • Dead Things links to evidence suggesting insomnia and poor sleep are not disorders, but rather evolutionary inheritances that were useful in the past.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the critical human role in the ongoing sixth extinction.
  • Language Hat links to speculation that the Afroasiatic language family has its origins in the Natufian Levant.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a fascinating French show about espionage, Le Bureau des légendes.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on an important speech by Malcolm Turnbull on politics and Australia’s Liberal Party.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Marc Rayman’s report on the latest discoveries of Dawn at Ceres.
  • Spacing’ Sean Ruthven has a review of a beautiful book on the Sea Ranch, a northern California estate.
  • Back in May, Septembre Anderson argued at Torontoist that rather than embracing diversity, Canadian media was more willing to wither.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument suggesting Baltic Russians would not follow the Donbas into revolt because the Baltics are much better off economically.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Anthropology.net notes on how a fossil tooth led eventually to the identification of the fourth Denisovan individual known.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about reasons for people to travel solo.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird notes that the INF Treaty is on the verge of collapse.
  • Mathew Ingram uses a recent GIF of Trump with the Polish president’s wife to show how these lie and mislead.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a sharp collapse in London’s LGBT venues–more than half in the past decade!
  • Marginal Revolution reports on British actors who take up tutoring as a second job to support their careers.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the latest concerns of South Koreans regarding their northern neighbour.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes issue with proposed Australian government surveillance of the local Internet.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell dissects the origins of the false claim that Copernicus was a Catholic priest.
  • Unicorn Booty has a fantastic interview with a scholar, Jamie Bernthal, who makes a case for queer content in Agatha Christie.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that methane bubble explosions in Siberia could wreck Russian pipelines.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait investigates a mysterious streak on a photo of Messier 77. Asteroid, satellite, something else?
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the latest attempt at a census estimate of brown dwarfs in the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin considers the diminishing role of the pundit, displaced by the expert.
  • D-Brief is one of many sources to note the deadly, ubiquitous perchlorates of Mars. Mars is dead for good reasons.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to a tweetstorm by one Kate Antonova arguing that the ideological labels of the long 19th century no longer speak to our issues.
  • Language Hat notes how early Tsarist mappers were confused by confusing, often shared, placenames.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the recovery of a Bloomsbury Wedgwood service features the images of notable women.
  • Marginal Revolution shares opinions that Macron is overrated, not least in terms of the distinctiveness of some of his policies from those of Trump.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that projected shrinkage of the workforce of Russia means either economic decline or controversial immigration.

[URBAN NOTE] Three notes on economic declines, of Sears Canada, Postmedia, and Toronto real estate

  • City News shares a Canadian Press article sharing the warning issued by Sears Canada itself, another historic colossus of retail, that it may well be coming to its end.
  • The Columbia Review of Journalism warns that Canada’s Postmedia chain is failing, and could take all our newspapers with it.
  • Tess Kalinowski at the Toronto Star observes that the number of Greater Toronto Area home sales has continued to decline.

[URBAN NOTE] On the West End Phoenix and #localjournalism

My attention was piqued at the end of May by Lauren Pelley’s CBC report about the West End Phoenix, a new community newspaper in Toronto imagined by Dave Bidini. The Phoenix, a monthly broadsheet slated to concern itself with west-end Toronto “from the Junction Triangle to Parkdale, Christie Pits to Baby Point”, will be sustained by annual subscriptions and gifts from donors.

The non-profit publication is the brainchild of Toronto writer, publisher and musician Dave Bidini, and sparked, in part, by his 2015 writing trip to the Northwest Territories, where he spent the summer working at The Yellowknifer.

“I was reinvigorated by that experience,” he told CBC Toronto.

Bidini — who’s beloved in Canada for his years with the Rheostatics — wondered if a hyper-local newspaper could flourish in Toronto’s west end, where he’s been living for 23 years in the house he bought from his grandmother.

“I’ve seen the west end evolve as a social organism, I suppose. It’s a pretty interesting time here. You blink, and there’s something new and different,” he mused. “I wondered about the ability of a newspaper to sustain here, and to illuminate that evolution.”

[. . .]

Bidini’s vision for the newspaper is a visual and literary representation of “that feeling you get when you’re wandering home one night and you find yourself up an alley you haven’t traveled through before.”

Already, he’s joined by deputy editor Melanie Morassutti and senior editor Susan Grimbly, both formerly of The Globe and Mail, and has an advisory council assembled with notable names from the city’s arts and culture scene, including Grid founder Laas Turnbull and J-Source managing editor H.G. Watson.

I am fascinated by this project. Consider this post a placeholder of sorts.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 11, 2017 at 11:59 pm