A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘hq2

[URBAN NOTE] Five links on cities: Star Trek, mass transit, California rail, Green New Deal, HQ2

  • The Conversation considers what Star Trek has to say about sustainable urban development.
  • This New York Times article looks at how, in the United States, it is the cities of the West that are leading the country in developing effective mass transit now.
  • CityLab looks at the retreat of California from its full vision of a high-speed rail connection.
  • CityLab considers what a Green new Deal could do to help suburbia.
  • The Atlantic thinks that the rejection of Amazon HQ2 by New York City is good if it leads to an end in competitive subsidies by different jurisdictions to attract businesses.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Detroit, Québec City, Boston, Queens, Colonia del Sacramento

  • CityLab shares newly unearthed photos of the destroyed Detroit neighbourhood of Black Bottom.
  • The National Post reports that apparently the latest iteration of the Winter Carnival in Québec City has not met with popular approval.
  • CityLab explored for Valentine’s Day the notable history of Boston as a centre for the manufacture of candy.
  • CityLab notes how the nascent condo boom in Queens’ Long Island City, set to capitalize on the Amazon HQ2 there, has been undermined abruptly by Amazon’s withdrawal.
  • Ozy looks at the historic Uruguay town of Colonia del Sacramento.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the genesis of ocean worlds. Having a nearly massive star producing lots of radioactive aluminum when it supernovas might be surprisingly important.
  • The Crux takes a look at languages newly forming in the world around us, starting with the Australian language of Light Warlpiri. What does this say about humans and language?
  • D-Brief notes that researchers have managed to create cyborg rats whose motions are controlled directly by human thought.
  • Gizmodo reports on the abandonment by Amazon of its plan for a HQ2 campus in Queens.
  • JSTOR Daily shares the perfectly believable argument that people with autism should not be viewed as people incapable of love.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Simon Balto writes about how the Ryan Adams scandal demonstrates the male gatekeeper effect in popular music.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution comes up with a list of winners and losers of the Amazon decision not to set up HQ2 in Queens. (Myself, I am unconvinced New York City is a loser here.)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how, despite not interacting directly with normal matter, dark matter can still be heated up by the matter and energy we see around us.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in many post-Soviet countries including the Baltic States and Ukraine, ethnic Russians are assimilating into local majority ethnic groups.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Queens, Fort McMurray, Casablanca, Aleppo, Baghdad

  • Guardian Cities looks at prosperous Long Island City and hard-pressed Blissville, two neighbourhoods of Queens that will be transformed by Amazon moving in.
  • CBC notes how, for Fort McMurray five years after the oil boom’s end, the bust is the new normal.
  • CityLab reports on how the Art Deco Les Abbattoirs complex in Casablanca, once an emerging artist hub, has been emptied by the city government.
  • This Middle East Eye feature looks at the relief and loss felt by returning survivors in Aleppo.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how Baghdad, fragmented and impoverished by war, is fumbling towards some sort of livability.

[URBAN NOTE} Six Toronto links: HQ2, social capital, ravines, Yonge/Bloor, Port Lands, Eastern Ave

  • CBC notes that Toronto probably did well by not getting picked as the home of the potentially overwhelming Amazon HQ2.
  • Happily, Toronto’s stockpile of social capital in different neighbourhoods does not seem to be diminishing. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Francine Kopun reports on the problems facing the ecologies of the Toronto ravine system, and how these parks might be helped, over at the Toronto Star.
  • blogTO shares a series of photos of Yonge and Bloor, running more than eight decades up to 2005. (I miss that intersection.)
  • Urban Toronto notes how the development of the Port Lands is literally creating a new coastline for Toronto.
  • blogTO suggests that Eastern Avenue, east of the Don, is set to become the next development hotspot in Toronto.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Socialist Modernism, capping highways, desert cities, Amazon, Google

  • Guardian Cities introduces readers to the Socialist Moderism Instagram account, part of a project by Romania’s Bureau for Art and Urban Research to preserve records of Eastern Bloc architecture.
  • Brian Martucci at Oxy writes about how many American communities are capping their highways, burying them underground, and in so doing restoring neighbourhoods split by mid-20th century construction.
  • This beautiful long-form essay at Lithub by Saritha Ramakrishna, looking at her childhood in Phoenix, imagines what futures will be available to the United States’ desert cities in the foreseeable future.
  • Matt Taylor at VICE notes that non-rich people face being driven out of major cities and that initiatives like wooing Amazon will only make things worse.
  • Via the Map Room Blog, I found Jack Nicas’ New York Times article noting how Google Maps is not only renaming old neighbourhoods and creating new ones, but that these labels now stick.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: HQ2, Geary Avenue, Yonge and Eglinton, Port Lands, Pickering subway

  • Ben Fox Rubin at CNET reports on the perhaps surprisingly successful bid of Toronto to host Amazon’s HQ2.
  • blogTO reports on how Geary Avenue, just one street away from me, is becoming one of the most interesting streets in Toronto for nightclubbing and more.
  • Many residents of Yonge and Eglinton are unhappy with the pace of condo construction in the neighbourhood. Local resources–like utilities, and local schools–are coming under pressure. blogTO reports.
  • Part of Lake Ontario in the Port Lands, off Cherry Street, is being filled in for condo development. CityNews reports.
  • John Lorinc at Spacing looks at the many ways in which Premier Doug Ford’s proposal of extending the subway to Pickering simply does not work.