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[URBAN NOTE] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the possibility that our model for the evolution of galaxies might be partially disproven by Big Data.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly reports how she did her latest article for the New York Times.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the beginning of a search for habitable-zone planets around Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • The Crux looks at how the skull trophies of the ancient Maya help explain civilizational collapse.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting that our humble, seemingly stable Sun can produce superflares.
  • Dead Things reports on the latest informed speculation about the sense of smell of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares the NASA report on its progress towards the Lunar Gateway station.
  • Gizmodo looks at the growing number of China’s beautiful, deadly, blooms of bioluminescent algae.
  • io9 reports that Stjepan Sejic has a new series with DC, exploring the inner life of Harley Quinn.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at an example of a feminist musical, the Chantal Akerman The Eighties.
  • Language Hat links to a review of a dystopian novel by Yoko Tawada, The Emissary, imagining a future Japan where the learning of foreign languages is banned.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that history, and the writing of history, is an actual profession with skills and procedures writers in the field need to know.
  • Liam Shaw writes at the LRB Blog about how people in London, late in the Second World War, coped with the terrifying attacks of V2 rockets.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new book, Wayfinding, about the neuroscience of navigation.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reviews a Robert Zubrin book advocating the colonization of space and finds himself unconvinced.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the ancient comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko explored by the ESA Rosetta probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms provides tips for visitors to the Paraguay capital of Asuncion.
  • Peter Rukavina reports that, on the day the new PEI legislature came in, 105% of Island electricity came from windpower.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel argues that, in searching for life, we should not look for exoplanets very like Earth.
  • Strange Company shares another weekend collection of diverse links.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little shares the views of Margaret Gilbert on social facts.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Kadyrov might dream of a broad Greater Chechnya, achieved at the expense of neighbouring republics.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some superhero identity crises, of Superman and of others.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the recent study of near-Earth asteroid 1999 KW4, looking at it from the perspective of defending the Earth and building a civilization in space.
  • Ingrid Robeyns at Crooked Timber continues a debate on universal basic income.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers if India does need its own military space force.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how foster care in the United States (Canada, too, I’d add) was also synonymous with sending children off as unpaid farm labourers.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a proposal, linking immigration to high-income countries to the idea of immigration as reparation for colonialism.
  • The LRB Blog considers the ever-growing presence of the dead on networks like Facebook.
  • Muhammad Idrees Ahmad at the NYR Daily looks at how Bellingcat and other online agencies have transformed investigative journalism.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a speech by the head of the Bank of Japan talking about the interactions of demographic change and economic growth.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the mystery behind the great mass of early black hole J1342+0928.
  • Strange Company looks at the unsolved Christmas 1928 disappearance of young Melvin Horst from Orrville, Ohio. What happened?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Uzbekistan is moving the Latin script for Uzbek into closer conformity with its Turkish model.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams reports on how dataset mining of K2 data revealed 18 more Earth-sized planets.
  • Crooked Timber speculates on how Clarence Thomas might rule on abortion given his public rulings.
  • D-Brief observes that some corals in Hawaii appear to thrive in acidic waters. Is there hope yet for coral reefs?
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about how sociology and history overlap, in their subjects and in their methods.
  • Far Outliers examines how the last remnants of Soviet power faded quickly around the world in 1991.
  • Gizmodo looks at how an image of a rare albino panda has just been captured.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how Christian fundamentalists want to make the east of Washington State into a 51st state run by Biblical law.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how trees can minimize algae blooms in nearby water systems.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log takes issue with problematic pop psychology regarding bilingualism in Singapore.
  • Lawyers, Guns, and Money takes issue with trying to minimize court decisions like (for instance) a hypothetical overthrow of Miranda v. Arizona. (Roe v. Wade is what they are concerned with.)
  • The NYR Daily looks at the short storied life of avant-garde filmmaker Barbara Rubin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why we can never learn everything about our universe.
  • Towleroad notes that downloads of the relationship app Hinge have surged after Pete Buttigieg said he met his now-husband there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Ukraine is seeking to have the Kerch Strait separating Crimea from adjacent Russia declared an international body of water.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at what famed gay writer John Rechy is doing these days.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Architectuul looks at the history of brutalism in late 20th century Turkey.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the evidence for the Milky Way Galaxy having seen a great period of starburst two billion years ago, and notes how crowded the Milky Way Galaxy is in the direction of Sagittarius.
  • Centauri Dreams considers if astrometry might start to become useful as a method for detecting planets, and considers what the New Horizons data, to Pluto and to Ultima Thule, will be known for.
  • Belle Waring at Crooked Timber considers if talk of forgiveness is, among other things, sound.
  • D-Brief considers the possibility that the differing natures of the faces of the Moon can be explained by an ancient dwarf planet impact, and shares images of dust-ringed galaxy NGC 4485.
  • Dead Things notes the discovery of fossil fungi one billion years old in Nunavut.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, over 1990, Russia became increasingly independent from the Soviet Union, and looks at the final day in office of Gorbachev.
  • Gizmodo notes the discovery of literally frozen oceans of water beneath the north polar region of Mars, and looks at an unusual supernova, J005311 ten thousand light-years away in Cassiopeia, product of a collision between two white dwarfs.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the colour of navy blue is a direct consequence of slavery and militarism, and observes the historical influence, or lack thereof, of Chinese peasant agriculture on organic farming in the US.
  • Language Log considers a Chinese-language text from San Francisco combining elements of Mandarin and Cantonese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terrible environmental consequences of the Vietnam War in Southeast Asia, and Shakezula at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at how, and perhaps why, Sam Harris identifies milkshake-throwing at far-right people as a form of “mock assassination”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a personal take on mapmaking on the Moon during the Apollo era.
  • Marginal Revolution observes a paper suggesting members of the Chinese communist party are more liberal than the general Chinese population. The blog also notes how Soviet quotas led to a senseless and useless mass slaughter of whales.
  • Russell Darnley writes about the complex and tense relationship between Indonesia and Australia, each with their own preoccupations.
  • Martin Filler writes at the NYR Daily about I.M. Pei as an architect specializing in an “establishment modernism”. The site also takes a look at Orientalism, as a phenomenon, as it exists in the post-9/11 era.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reflects on the meaning of Australia’s New England.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how Hayabusa 2 is having problems recovering a marker from asteroid Ryugu.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an outstanding Jane Siberry concert on the Island.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map of homophobia in Europe.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress makes use of wikidata.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle reports, with photos, from his latest walks this spring.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what the Earth looked like when hominids emerged, and explains how amateur astronomers can capture remarkable images.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a controversial map depicting the shift away from CNN towards Fox News across the United States.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the Boeing 737 MAX disaster as an organizational failure.
  • Window on Eurasia looks why Turkey is backing away from supporting the Circassians, and suggests that the use of the Russian Orthodox Church by the Russian state as a tool of its rule might hurt the church badly.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes apart, linguistically and otherwise, a comic playing on the trope of Lassie warning about something happening to Timmy. He also
    reports on a far-removed branch of the Zwicky family hailing from Belarus, as the Tsvikis.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes how, in galaxy 3XMM J150052.0+015452 1.8 billion light-years away, a black hole has been busily eating a star for a decade.
  • Centauri Dreams considers how relativistic probes might conduct astronomy. How would their measurements be changed by these high speeds?
  • The Crux reports on how scientists are trying to save the platypus in its native rivers of Australia.
  • D-Brief reports on the quiet past of Kuiper Belt object Ultima Thule.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on UAV news from around the world.
  • Joe. My. God. reports a statement by a Trump biography suggesting that the American president believes in not following laws because of his belief in his own “genetic superiority”.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the importance of the longleaf pine in the history of the United States.
  • Language Hat considers, in the case of Australia, the benefits of reviving indigenous languages.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers how the success of Israel in hosting Eurovision is a blow against the Netanyahu government.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog looks at the peculiar position of private schools in the UK, and their intersection with public life.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a paper analyzing two centuries of British writers noting that productivity was boosted for the least productive if they lived in London.
  • The NYR Daily notes the end of famed French periodical Les temps modernes.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog notes the expected crash of Chinese smallsat Longjiang-2 from its lunar orbit at the end of July.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money notes how ex-president of Argentina Cristina Fern├índez, running for election this year, was lucky in having the economic crash occur after the end of her presidency.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains the different reasons behind the blues of the sky and the ocean.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that three hundred thousand Russians have died of HIV/AIDS since the virus manifested on Soviet territory in the late 1980s, with more deaths to come thanks to mismanagement of the epidemic.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul notes the recent death of I.M. Pei.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes what, exactly, rubble-pile asteroids are.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about definitions of home.
  • Centauri Dreams considers white dwarf planets.
  • The Crux notes how ultra-processed foods are liked closely to weight gain.
  • D-Brief observes that a thin layer of insulating ice might be saving the subsurface oceans of Pluto from freezing out.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the critical role played by Apollo 10 in getting NASA ready for the Moon landings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the American government’s expectation that China will seek to set up its own global network of military bases.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the Soviet Union’s Venera 5 and 6 missions to Venus.
  • Far Outliers looks at the visit of U.S. Grant to Japan and China.
  • Gizmodo notes a recent analysis of Neanderthal teeth suggesting that they split with Homo sapiens at a date substantially earlier than commonly believed.
  • io9 notes the sheer scale of the Jonathan Hickman reboots for the X-Men comics of Marvel.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the argument of Ted Cruz that people should stop making fun of his “space pirate” suggestion.I am inclined to think Cruz more right than not, actually.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the wave of anti-black violence that hit the United States in 1919, often driven by returned veterans.
  • Language Hat shares a recognizable complaint, written in ancient Akkadian, of bad customers.
  • Language Log shares a report of a village in Brittany seeking people to decipher a mysterious etching.
  • This Scott Lemieux report at Lawyers, Guns and Money about how British conservatives received Ben Shapiro is a must-read summary.
  • Benjamin Markovits at the LRB Blog shares the reasons why he left his immigrant-heavy basketball team in Germany.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at one effort in Brazil to separate people from their street gangs.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how ISIS, deprived of its proto-state, has managed to thrive as a decentralized network.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences and perceptions of his native region of New England, in southeastern Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how the Chang’e 4 rover may have found lunar mantle on the surface of the Moon.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that while Argentine president Mauricio Macri is polling badly, his opponents are not polling well.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of things to do in see in the Peru capital of Lima.
  • The Signal examines how the Library of Congress engages in photodocumentation.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal explains how he is helping native insects by planting native plants in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how scientific illiteracy should never be seen as cool.
  • Towleroad notes the questions of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as to why Truvada costs so much in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how family structures in the North Caucasus are at once modernizing and becoming more conservative.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how the distribution of US carriers and their fleets at present does not support the idea of a planned impending war with Iran.
  • Arnold Zwicky examines the tent caterpillar of California.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes that the location of the Apollo 12 Ascent Module on the Moon may have been found.
  • Kieran Healy writes about how he uses scripts to produce animated graphics illustrating charging patterns of baby names over the 20th century in the United States.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Japan has been cleaning up Tohoku after the Fukushima disaster.
  • Language Hat looks at an upcoming book project taking a look at how different languages written in the Arabic script interact with each other.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money, looking at “The Bells”, makes the case that this episode’s solution to the issues of Daenerys was probably the best one that could be devised within Game of Thrones’ self-imposed limitations.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the trial in Israeli military courts of Palestinian activist Issa Amro.
  • Jason C. Davis notes at the Planetary Society Blog that the Lightsail 2 spacecraft is scheduled for a June launch.
  • Peter Rukavina reacts, with eventual cool printings, to the Fluxus movement in mid-20th century art.
  • Strange Company shares the story of pioneering Edwardian parachustist Dolly Shepherd.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society shares his 1970s proposal for a Marxist philosophy of the social sciences.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the GULAG system was a net loss for the Soviet economy, costly and employing workers at low productivity levels. (Bringing it back would be a mistake, then.)
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some wonderful photos of some remarkable lilies.