A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘bookstores

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at evidence that Ceres’ Occator Crater, an apparent cryovolcano, may have been recently active.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin wonders what would have happened had Kerensky accepted the German Reichstag’s proposal in 1917.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some fun that employees at a bookstore in France got up to with book covers.
  • Cody Delistraty describes F. Scott Fitzgerald’s utter failure to fit into Hollywood.
  • A Fistful of Euros hosts Alex Harrowell’s blog post taking a look at recent history from a perspective of rising populism.
  • io9 reports on a proposal from the Chinese city of Lanzhou to set up a water pipeline connecting it to Siberia’s Lake Baikal.
  • Imageo notes a recent expedition by Norwegian scientists aiming at examining the winter ice.
  • Strange Maps links to an amazing graphic mapping the lexical distances between Europe’s languages.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is on the verge of a new era of population decline, and shares a perhaps alarming perspective on the growth of Muslim populations in Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] “Indie bookstores angered by Toronto Arts Council grant to IFOA”

NOW Toronto‘s Susan G. Cole notes how independent bookstores in Toronto are upset by a grant of money by the Toronto municipal government to a literary festival.

A grant from the Toronto Arts Council to the International Festival of Authors, bestowed last fall, has outraged programmers for the city’s independent bookstores.

“The decision to fund IFOA feels like a nail in the coffin for indie bookstores and shows the Arts Council’s lack of concern for the financial health of independent booksellers,” says Another Story event organizer Anjula Gogia, representing other indie stores and festivals as well, including Pages Unbound and Glad Day Books.

The IFOA’s new program called Toronto Lit Up has received close to $300,000 over three years and is designed to assist publishers in launching new books by Toronto authors.

IFOA director Geoffrey Taylor explains that a committee – comprised of himself, author Dionne Brand, Quill and Quire’s Allison Jones and Hazel Millar, representing the Literary Press Group – has been formed to allocate the monies and is accepting applications from publishers and authors seeking funds for launches.

The problem, according to Gogia, the former programmer for the now shuttered Toronto Women’s Bookstore, is that indie stores could very well be squeezed out of the launch scene that’s so crucial to their businesses. Books sold at launches represent their bread and butter.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 27, 2017 at 5:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “The fascinating history of Toronto’s oldest bookstore”

blogTO’s Phil Villeneuve shares the story of Toronto’s Glad Day Bookshop, the oldest GLBT library in the world still operating.

Very few book stores in the world have been fought off widespread hate, battled censorship at the Supreme Court, and acted as home base for an entire community of people. Toronto’s Glad Day bookshop has, which is why it’s even more special that it’s not only Toronto’s oldest bookstore, but the world’s oldest LGBT bookstore.

Glad Day took the title after New York’s Oscar Wilde bookstore closed in 2009 because of low sales and high rent. That shop opened in 1967.

Glad Day was opened in 1970 by Jearld Moldenhauer out of his home in the Annex. The residential space also doubled as the office for The Body Politic, a gay and lesbian political paper, which eventually morphed into Xtra and then to the now online-only DailyXtra.com.

After folks moved in and out of the home, Moldenhauer and a group men bought a place in Cabbagetown at 138 Seaton Street and operated the shop out of there.

It was a time when a gay and lesbian bookstore could exist out of someone’s living room and word spread wide enough for the city’s queer population to know exactly where to go — all very much on the down low and in fear of violence.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 21, 2017 at 8:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “Cardinal Rule shacks up with Glad Day on Church”

NOW Toronto‘s Natalia Manzocco describes another good reason to go to Glad Day Bookshop: Roncesvalles diner Cardinal Rule is setting up shop in the location’s kitchen. I really like this addition to Glad Day’s business model, not least because the idea of indie businesses collaborating for greater profit for everyone has a lot of appeal for me.

Even with all the cultural clout that comes from 47 years in business, Glad Day Bookshop had to face up to a tough truth last year: It’s tough for a business to survive on book sales alone.

With a move to spacious new digs in the heart of the Church-Wellesley Village (499 Church, at Wellesley, 416-961-4161, gladdaybookshop.com) at the end of 2016, the world’s oldest surviving gay bookstore gained a few new titles – bar, cafe, and multi-use event space.

Its latest sobriquet: restaurant. Before the shelves of books (several of which are on wheels – all the better to make room for dance parties!) were brought in, the ground-floor unit was home to Byzantium, a martini bar and Continental kitchen that served the community for 23 years.

“Byzantium was mostly known as an eating spot. It was a bit of a martini bar in the 90s, but in the last 10 years, most of the people came for the food,” CEO Michael Erickson says. The space was already fully outfitted for cooking and backing, and though meal service was always in the cards for the new space, they weren’t sure if they were up to the task themselves.

“When we talked about what we wanted to do for food, we were like, ‘We want it to be like Cardinal Rule’,” Erickson says. “And then we thought, ‘Why don’t we just ask them?'” Looks like it all worked out. Last week, the beloved queer-owned Roncy diner (co-owners Katie James and chef Marta Kusel are a married couple) debuted its first slate of menu items out of Glad Day.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 16, 2017 at 7:15 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “There’s a black market for stolen books in Toronto, apparently”

CBC News’ Ali Chiasson reports on Toronto’s trade in stolen books.

Japanese author Haruki Murakami may be known worldwide for novels that straddle the border between the dreamworld and reality.

But in Toronto he’s better known as the most popular author among literary thieves, at least according to the city’s bookstore owners.

An entire shelf dedicated to Murakami books disappeared in December at the Roncesvalles store A Good Read.

“I lost $800 the last two times this guy hit me,” owner Gary Kir told CBC Toronto. “They’re very easily converted into cash, because they’re very high in demand and they don’t turn up that often used.”

[. . .]

Derek McCormack has worked at bookstores in Toronto for 25 years and says the most shoplifted names come and go in waves.

“It used to be all the beats,” said McCormack, of Type Books on Queen Street West. “Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. Then it became [Vladimir] Nabokov by far — you couldn’t keep Lolita on the shelf.”

Written by Randy McDonald

January 8, 2017 at 7:00 pm

[PHOTO] “Books! Booze! Come in and get lit”

This sandwich board on Church Street outside the door of Glad Day Bookshop cheered me up last week. Since its move to the heart of Church and Wellesley, I’ve been trying to go to Glad Day as often as I can. It’s a good bookshop and a great space. Plus, who doesn’t like a bookshop where you can get pints?

Written by Randy McDonald

December 12, 2016 at 12:26 pm

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Natha Smith talks about his tradition of the stuffed Christmas stocking.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling talks about the decline of the Pebble wearables.
  • blogTO lists some of the hot new bookstores in Toronto.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about some of her family’s traditions.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at the ancient history of rice cultivation in the Indus Valley Civilization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the willingness of the Oklahoma Cherokee Nation to recognize same-sex marriages.
  • Language Log shares a photo of an unusual multi-script ad from East Asia.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the Russian involvement in the American election and its import.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a book about the transition in China’s financial sector.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on efforts to revive the moribund and very complex Caucasian of Ubykh.