A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘bookstores

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.
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[URBAN NOTE] Three Toronto links: 698 Spadina, free museums, cleaner transport

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  • Will 698 Spadina Avenue be torn down for new U of T student housing? blogTO reports.
  • A variety of Toronto museums are going to be offering free admission until November 30th. Inside Toronto reports.
  • There are good public health initiatives for Toronto to move to cleaner transportation technologies. The Toronto Star reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 28, 2017 at 4:30 pm

[NEWS] Four pop culture links: Moana and Maori pride, gay bookstores, a fake German beach, gay Trek

  • io9 has an interesting article looking at how the success of Disney’s film Moana is driving Maori pride in New Zealand.
  • New Now Next lists eight of the top LGBTQ bookstores of North America and Europe, including Toronto’s Glad Day.
  • 24 hours on an artificial beach, sheltered under a hanger deep in east Germany, turns out to be quite fulfilling. VICE reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes that Star Trek: Discovery is a belated attempt to catch up with LGBTQ presence in pop culture.

[PHOTO] Eleven photos of Eliot’s Bookshop, Toronto

Eliot’s Bookshop, located the intersection of Yonge and Wellesley at 584 Yonge Street. Since my first visit to Toronto in 2002, and long before then for others, Eliot’s has been a centrepiece of Toronto’s used book market, the three stories of the building being packed with used books of all kinds spilling off their shelves. How sad, then, that rising property taxes on Yonge mean that Eliot’s will have to close up shop, the owner of the building and the bookstore hoping to find a more profitable business to take over his lease.

Eliot's Bookshop (1) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (2) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (3) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (4) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (5) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Eliot's Bookshop (6) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (7) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (8) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (9) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (10) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (11) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Written by Randy McDonald

September 18, 2017 at 11:00 am

[URBAN NOTE] Four notes about the past and future of queer life in a dynamic Toronto

  • In the Toronto Star, Emma Teitel wonders how long Church and Wellesley will last as a hub as the queer community develops and migrates away.
  • Trevor Corkum, also in the Toronto Star, explores the important role of the Glad Day Bookshop in modern Toronto’s gay and literary scenes.
  • Brian Bradley tells the story of Craig Russell, an early drag queen who became a star and started a still-living cultural tradition of drag performances in Toronto.
  • In NOW Toronto, Vaughn Grey tells the story of how he successfully escaped Jamaica to claim refugee status in Toronto.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg looks at the recent surge of Chinese investment in Southeast Asia.
  • Culture.pl looks at why Nietzsche falsely claimed Polish ancestry.
  • Foreign Policy suggests that this is a new age of German prominence in the West.
  • The New Yorker finds Amazon’s new brick-and-mortar bookstores lacking.
  • The Toronto Star shares claims that learning a second language provides mental benefits.
  • Universe Today notes the discovery of potentially habitable super-Earth Gliese 625 b.
  • Vice’s Motherboard notes how the popularization of ayahuasca-driven spirit quests has actually hurt traditional users.
  • Vox notes the latest Russia-Ukraine history fight on Twitter.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at evidence that Ceres’ Occator Crater, an apparent cryovolcano, may have been recently active.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin wonders what would have happened had Kerensky accepted the German Reichstag’s proposal in 1917.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some fun that employees at a bookstore in France got up to with book covers.
  • Cody Delistraty describes F. Scott Fitzgerald’s utter failure to fit into Hollywood.
  • A Fistful of Euros hosts Alex Harrowell’s blog post taking a look at recent history from a perspective of rising populism.
  • io9 reports on a proposal from the Chinese city of Lanzhou to set up a water pipeline connecting it to Siberia’s Lake Baikal.
  • Imageo notes a recent expedition by Norwegian scientists aiming at examining the winter ice.
  • Strange Maps links to an amazing graphic mapping the lexical distances between Europe’s languages.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is on the verge of a new era of population decline, and shares a perhaps alarming perspective on the growth of Muslim populations in Russia.