A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘borders

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • James Bow notes, by way of explaining new fiction he is writing, why a Mercury colony makes sense.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the life of Anita Brenner, a Mexican-born American Jewish writer who helped connect the two North American neighbours.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes the cautious approach of the United States towards famine relief in the young Soviet Union in 1922.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares a brief Lewis Mumford quote, talking about how men became mechanical in spirit before they invented complex machines.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the many ways in which the movie Addams Family Values is queer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the idea of what “thoughtfulness” means in relation to Senator Al Franken.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few more fantasy map generators.
  • The NYR Daily considers the thoughtful stamp art of Vincent Sardon.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell recommends Adam Rutherford’s new book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, on genomics and history.
  • Towleroad notes that Demi Levato took trans Virginian politician Danica Roem her to the American Music Awards.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Tatar cleric’s speculation that Russia’s undermining of the Tatar language in education might push Tatars away from Russia.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly takes a look at the concept of resilience.
  • D-Brief notes the many ways in which human beings can be killed by heat waves.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a claim for the discovery of a new pulsar planet, PSR B0329+54 b, two Earth masses with an orbit three decades long.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that, in some was, online connectivity is like a drug.
  • Hornet Stories considers the plight of bisexuals in the closet.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the family name of Hungarian Karl-Maria Kertbeny, the man who developed the term “homosexuality”, and much else besides.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the item of soap was a key component behind racism and apartheid in South Africa.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes a new book, The Quotable Darwin.
  • Peter Rukavina takes a look at 18 years’ worth of links on his blog. How many are still good? The answer may surprise you.
  • Understanding Society considers the insights of Tony Judt on the psychology of Europeans after the Second World War.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever considers, in Q&A format, some insights for men in the post-Weinstein era.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how boundaries in the Caucasus were not necessarily defined entirely by the Bolsheviks.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers various odd appearances of pickles in contemporary popular culture.

[URBAN NOTE] Edmonton, Dartmouth, Montréal and Valérie Plante, Trump and the Bills

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  • Global News notes a celebration of Harbin Gate, in Edmonton, a Chinese monument that may not be reassembled.
  • Dartmouth, it’s being said, is becoming the Brooklyn of Halifax. Global News reports.
  • It turns out that Donald Trump was involved in the push to keep the Buffalo Bills from moving to Toronto. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Chantal Hébert places the election of Valérie Plante as mayor of Montréal in the context of a backlash against elites.
  • Toula Drimonis at the National Observer places the election of Valérie Plante in the context of her strengths as a believable politician.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes that the search for exoplanets with life may turn up not clear, but ambiguous, evidence.
  • D-Brief notes the invention of a new, reversible invisible ink.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on how metal-rich Sun-like star HD 173701 gives us insight into the cycles of the Sun.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining how stellar activity can erode closely-orbiting rocky exoplanets.
  • Hornet Stories reports on some problematic LGBTQ characters of colour in horror films.
  • Language Log notes how the Chinese phrase “dǎ call 打call”, used in propaganda, has gone viral.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the astonishing sympathy of John Kelly for the Confederacy.
  • The LRB Blog notes how technology and bureaucracy make borders ever more permeable.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reflects on the wonderful Persian Letters of Montesquieu.
  • The NYR Daily notes that, whatever the Manafort-Gates scandal is, it is not Trump’s easy equivalent of Watergate.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how astronomers were able to determine A/2017 U1 did not come from this solar system.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: tourism, winter, HQ2, public art, wards, streets

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  • Shawn Micallef talks about where he, and other people in Toronto, takes visitors to this city.
  • Toronto is opening an additional five respite centres for the homeless. The Toronto Star reports.
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  • Royson James suggests the confident bid of Toronto for the Amazon HQ2 shows the maturity of the city.
  • A new report by OACD and the University of Toronto looks at ways Toronto can improve its public art scene. Metro Toronto reports.
  • The ward boundaries of Toronto remain unclear as the election approaches. Torontoist reports.
  • blogTO reports on exciting plans to remake the streets of Toronto for a more populous future.

[URBAN NOTE] Three links about cities and borders: Dover, Narva, Detroit

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  • Anything but the softest of Brexits is going to leave Dover, port of entry into the UK, with massive traffic jams. Bloomberg reports.
  • The people of the largely Russian city of Narva, in Estonia, occupy an awkward but viable position. (For now.) Open Democracy reports.
  • Detroit is making a come-back, but many of its long-time inhabitants are not enjoying the revival. VICE reports.