A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘borders

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes that lidar scanning has revealed that the pre-Columbian city of Angamuco, in western Mexico, is much bigger than previously thought.
  • James Bow makes an excellent case for the revitalization of VIA Rail as a passenger service for longer-haul trips around Ontario.
  • D-Brief notes neurological evidence suggesting why people react so badly to perceived injustices.
  • The Dragon’s Tales takes a look at the list of countries embracing thorough roboticization.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the most powerful launch vehicles, both Soviet and American, to date.
  • Far Outliers considers Safavid Iran as an imperfect gunpowder empire.
  • Despite the explanation, I fail to see how LGBTQ people could benefit from a cryptocurrency all our own. What would be the point, especially in homophobic environments where spending it would involve outing ourselves? Hornet Stories shares the idea.
  • Imageo notes that sea ice off Alaska has actually begun contracting this winter, not started growing.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the production and consumption of lace, and lace products, was highly politicized for the Victorians.
  • Language Hat makes a case for the importance of translation as a political act, bridging boundaries.
  • Language Log takes a look at the pronunciation and mispronunciation of city names, starting with PyeongChang.
  • This critical Erik Loomis obituary of Billy Graham, noting the preacher’s many faults, is what Graham deserves. From Lawyers, Guns and Money, here.
  • Bernard Porter at the LRB Blog is critical of the easy claims that Corbyn was a knowing agent of Communist Czechoslovakia.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this map from r/mapporn, imagining a United States organized into states as proportionally imbalanced in population as the provinces of Canada?
  • Marginal Revolution rightly fears a possible restart to the civil war in Congo.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on a controversial psychological study in Ghana that saw the investigation of “prayer camps”, where mentally ill are kept chain, as a form of treatment.
  • The NYR Daily makes the case that the Congolese should be allowed to enjoy some measure of peace from foreign interference, whether from the West or from African neighbous (Rwanda, particularly).
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla looks at the many things that can go wrong with sample return missions.
  • Rocky Planet notes that the eruption of Indonesian volcano Sinabung can be easily seen from space.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the New Horizons Pluto photos show a world marked by its subsurface oceans.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although fertility rates among non-Russians have generally fallen to the level of Russians, demographic momentum and Russian emigration drive continue demographic shifts.
  • Livio Di Matteo at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative charts the balance of federal versus provincial government expenditure in Canada, finding a notable shift towards the provinces in recent decades.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell makes the case, through the example of the fire standards that led to Grenfell Tower, that John Major was more radical than Margaret Thatcher in allowing core functions of the state to be privatized.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at some alcoholic drinks with outrĂ© names.
Advertisements

[ISL] Five islands notes: Caribbean and Jamaica migration, Diomedes, Indonesia, Finland

leave a comment »

  • Lyman Stone, at In A State of Migration, takes a look at the slow population growth in even the well-off Caribbean, thanks to substantial emigration.
  • At Jamaica Observer, Edward Seaga summarizes the history of Jamaican emigration–economically necessary–and worries about the impact of Trump.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Big Diomede and Little Diomede, two islands in the Bering Strait that not only have different sovereigns (the US and Russia) but different dates, too.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at how the indigenous population of Siberut, an Indonesian island west of Sumatra, are dealing with the effects of deforestation and cultural disruption.
  • Global News reports on an entrepreneur who wants to make an island in Finland into a women-only resort.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes the very recent discovery in Malaysia of the hitherto unsuspected Jedek language by anthropologists doing fieldwork.
  • Hornet Stories interviews the five stars of the new Queer Eye for the Straight Guy.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Trump plans to privatize the International Space Station.
  • JSTOR Daily links to some of the papers reflecting on the furor around Murphy Brown and that show’s depiction of single motherhood as a defensible choice.
  • Language Hat notes a contention that the more popular a language the more simplified its grammar will be. Is this correct?
  • Language Log notes how hockey terminology differs between the two Koreas, South Korea importing foreign words and the North creating neologisms.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money does not think a governmental shutdown in the US would have protected DREAMers.
  • Lingua Franca considers the different colloquial uses in English of “baked”.
  • The NYR Daily praises Suburra, a new crime drama set in contemporary Rome.
  • At Starts With A Bang, Ethan Siegel explains how scientists know that the universe is expanding.
  • Supernova Condensate explores the possibility that artificial intelligences might be readily locked into patterns of behaviours not taking human concerns into account and finds it not likely, barring huge design faults.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Khrushchev, not content with transferring Crimea from Russia to Ukraine, also considered border changes in Central Asia.

[DM] “On the unreality of imagining chain migration to be a bad thing”

leave a comment »

I’ve a post up at Demography Matters taking issue with the idea that chain migration is supposed to be a bad thing. What are these people talking about?

Written by Randy McDonald

February 10, 2018 at 12:00 am

[NEWS] Seven links on borders: Alberta, BC, Saskatchewan, Ontario, New York, Europe, NAFTA, Colombia

leave a comment »

  • Relations between Alberta and British Columbia, regarding the latter province’s disinterest in hosting a pipeline for Albertan oil, are not good at all. The National Post looks at things.
  • Things aren’t good between Alberta and Saskatchewan, either. The <INational Post imagines what it would be like if there was not just a trade war, but an actual war.
  • Kathleen Wynne warned that, if New York imposed “Buy American” requirements, Ontario would retaliate. The Toronto Star reported.
  • Steel from New York is the first trade item to face retaliatory measures in Ontario, The Globe and Mail noted.
  • A generation after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Europe still shows the marks left by Communism, Leonid Bershidsky notes at Bloomberg View.
  • Will getting rid of the name “NAFTA” really make North American integration less controversial? Global News looks at the idea.
  • Colombia is tightening its border controls to try to deal with the influx from Venezuela, Bloomberg notes.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

leave a comment »

  • anthro{dendum} hosts Alexia Maddox’s essay on her experience doing ethnographic work on Darknet drug markets.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about how the creative life, contrary to some imaginings, is not self-sustaining. It desperately needs external support–an outside job, perhaps.
  • Bruce Dorminey writes about how the climate of Chile, especially the Atacame, is perfect for astronomy.
  • JSTOR Daily shares a paper talking about how Alexander Pushkin, the 19th century Russian author, was demonstrably proud of his African ancestry.
  • Language Hat links to a new article on rongorongo, the mysterious and undeciphered script of the Rapa Nui of Polynesian Easter Island.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, notes in passing the oddness of restrictions imposed by customs in Chile on taking ordinary books into the country.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a bizarrely parochial article from the New York Times talking down to Los Angeles.
  • The Map Room Blog links to some interesting articles, from The New York Times recently and from the Atlantic in 2012, about the art of gerrymandering.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the import of the Nunes memo for Trump and Russian-American relations.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of a snack featuring canned fish by the beach in Mallorca.
  • Drew Rowsome quite approves of this year’s gay romance film Sebastian, set here in Toronto.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, contrary to predictions, most satellite galaxies orbit in the same plane as their hosts. This is a problem for dark matter.</li
  • Towleroad notes that some are lobbying Amazon not to locate its HQ2 in a city without human rights protections for LGBT people.

[NEWS] Five poltiics links: Doug Ford and Ontario, Tijuana-San Diego, Brexit, EU-Mercosur, Scotland

leave a comment »

  • CBC looks at how the Doug Ford bid for Ontario PC leadership is potentially transformative of the race, potentially destabilizing the party at a time when it is vulnerable.
  • The tightly-integrated and hugely-profitable economy uniting San Diego with Tijuana, across the US-Mexican border, continues despite Trump. Bloomberg View reports.
  • A French minister has warned a Japanese audience that the United Kingdom is not going to be part of Europe any more. (France, he notes, remains open to business.) Bloomberg has it.
  • Efforts are redoubling to sign a trade deal between the EU and South American bloc Mercosur. Bloomberg reports.
  • Gerry Hassan is critical of the SNP and Scottish separatism, partly because of its lack of successful radicalism in power. The essay is at Open Democracy.