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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.
  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes’ analysis of Forbidden Planet.
  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.
  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas–hence, new sources of economic growth–are harder to come by.
  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.
  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia’s Asian territories.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence’s introduction into our civilization to be managed.
  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.
  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.
  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.
  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada’s space future by the Space Advisory Board.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.

[NEWS] Five links: Greyhound in Canada, militarized Hamptons, Tohono O’odham, Rohingya, memes

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  • If Greyhound pulls out of northern BC, and the rest of rural Canada, what will happen to these regions? CBC reports.
  • The militarized community policing describes in Bloomberg View in New York’s famed Hamptons does say something worrisome of psyches.
  • A Bangladeshi observer makes the obvious point over at the Inter Press Service that Myanmar needs to radically change its treatment of the Rohingya.
  • Open Democracy looks at how the miliitarized US-Mexican border harms the Tohono O’odham, divided by said.
  • This Wired interview with Antonio Guillem, the photographer whose images made distracted boyfriend meme, is amazing.

[NEWS] Six links: Cities and Burning Man, urban China, gentrification, Belarus, Algeria, refugees

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  • Wired features an article talking about what Burning Man, and Black Rock City, teaches us about how cities work.
  • At The New Republic, Colin Kinniburgh talks about some strategies to fight gentrification, some potentially useful and others not.
  • Bloomberg View observes that China’s Pearl River Delta–briefly, most of urban Guangzhou from Hong Kong up–is set to have a huge property boom.
  • Bloomberg describes how Algeria, hostile to taking on debt, is going through a period of deep austerity.
  • Open Democracy looks at how the Belarusian language, despite improvements, is shut out of the country’s education system.
  • This Toronto Star article describing the detritus left by refugees fleeing New York just before they get to Canada is very sad.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte, loneliest galaxy in the Local Group.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the recent detailed view of the star Antares, and notes Antares’ mysteries.
  • False Steps’ Paul Drye notes Project Adam, a Sputnik-era proposal for a manned American suborbital flight.
  • Far Outliers recounts a 1945 encounter between an American general and the Sultan of Sulu, impoverished by the war.
  • Language Log notes the Sino-Indian propaganda video war over their border dispute in the Himalayas.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the messy process of the demobilization of FARC in Colombia.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how Virginia has managed to become a multicultural success story.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the photos of India taken by Cartier-Bresson.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders how, despite the drug war, Mexico City continues to feel (even be) so peaceful. Can it last?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel goes through the many reasons why it makes no sense to fear first contact with aliens.
  • Strange Company tells of Bunkie Dodge, pool-playing cat of early 20th century New England.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that the new Taylor Swift song is inspired by Right Said Fred’s “I’m So Sexy.”
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument that an essentially post-colonial Russophone cultural community cannot coexist with a Russian empire.