A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘sports

[NEWS] Five links about Canada and the future: Olympics, politics, demographics, Elizabeth II

  • The Conversation suggests that blaming the 1976 Montréal Olympics for the reluctance of Canada to host an Olympics should stop.
  • Is it possible that a Conservative majority government could be plausibly achieved by a breakthrough in Québec? Phiippe J. Fournier at MacLean’s considers.
  • A Conservative majority government, again, is perfectly imaginable. MacLean’s reports.
  • Don Pittis at CBC notes how worker shortages in Canada are leading to rising wages, in at least some areas.
  • What will happen, in Canada and elsewhere, when Queen Elizabeth II dies? MacLean’s speculates.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 26, 2019 at 11:45 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: HTO Beach, street art, transit, Draper Street, real estate

  • Toronto’s HTO Park, a fake beach on the waterfront of Queens Quay, has been flooded out by Lake Ontario, too. blogTO reports.
  • This open-air street art museum around Dundas West is an ingenious idea. blogTO reports.
  • David Hains at Spacing explains how the TTC plans for major sports events, like the recent Raptors series.
  • One house in Corso Italia has just gone on the real estate market for the first time since 1919. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The row of vintage homes on Draper Street and its recently passed keeper are memorialized nicely here. The Toronto Star reports.

[VIDEO] Five clips of Toronto celebrating the Toronto Raptors victory on Yonge Street

I intentionally made my way down to Yonge Street after midnight in order to witness the city celebrating the Toronto Raptors’ victory over the Golden State Warriors. The crowds were huge, though well-behaved; everyone, it seemed, was united behind the goal of celebrating this sports victory.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 14, 2019 at 9:45 am

[NEWS] 15 links about Canada and Canadian politics (#cdnpoli)

  • Scott Gilmore at MacLean’s notes how, in the United States, Canada as a model is a common idea among Democrats.
  • David Camfield argues at The Conversation that the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike offers lessons for Canadians now.
  • Le Devoir notes the recent argument of now-Québec premier François Legault that a Québec that was, like Ontario, a relatively wealthy province would be a Québec that would have fewer tensions with the rest of Canada. Is this plausible?
  • Éric Grenier notes at CBC that, in Ontario, Andrew Scheer’s federal conservatives will need to draw voters from beyond Ford Nation.
  • MacLean’s hosts the arguments of Frank Graves and Michael Valpy that Canadian politicians are not paying nearly the amount of attention to economic inequality that Canadians think they should.
  • MacLean’s makes the point that Conrad Black seems to see much to like in Donald Trump.
  • Ontario and the Canadian government are fighting over funding for the proposed Ontario Line, the Canadian government insisting it needs more information about the route. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Facebook, it turns out, chose not to pay proper attention to sending officials to testify at a Canada government inquiry into fake news. Maclean’s reports.
  • Justin Trudeau, speaking recently in Toronto, credited immigration for the success of the tech sector of Canada. CBC reports.
  • Foreign workers turn out to play a critical role in staffing the lobster plants in the Acadian fishing village of Meteghan, in Nova Scotia. CBC reports.
  • Canada and the United States are again disputing the claims of Canada to sovereignty over the Northwest Passage. Global News reports.
  • MacLean’s interviews Northwest Territories premier Bob McLeod, who dreams of a massive development of Arctic Canada, including a goal of a million residents for his territory.
  • Enzo DiMatteo suggests at NOW Toronto that the growing unpopularity of Doing Ford in Ontario might hurt the federal Conservatives badly.
  • Could the Green Party go mainstream across Canada? The Conversation considers.
  • The Conversation reports on what the national fervour over the Toronto Raptors represents, including the growing diversity of the population of Canada and the global spread of basketball.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: food, McDonald’s, cell phones, cricket, renoviction

  • NOW Toronto notes that poor and racialized people in Toronto find it difficult to access healthy food.
  • blogTO observes that the McDonald’s at King and Dufferin has installed blue lights in washrooms to try to discourage the shooting up there of heroin.
  • The TTC is set to offer cell phone service in some downtown tunnels. blogTO reports.
  • Perry King at Spacing reports on how Toronto needs to expand its facilities for the growing number of players of cricket.
  • Samantha Edwards at NOW Toronto reports that the owner of 795 College has been fined $C 135 000 for the renoviction of prior tenants.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Architectuul notes the recent death of I.M. Pei.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes what, exactly, rubble-pile asteroids are.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about definitions of home.
  • Centauri Dreams considers white dwarf planets.
  • The Crux notes how ultra-processed foods are liked closely to weight gain.
  • D-Brief observes that a thin layer of insulating ice might be saving the subsurface oceans of Pluto from freezing out.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the critical role played by Apollo 10 in getting NASA ready for the Moon landings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the American government’s expectation that China will seek to set up its own global network of military bases.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the Soviet Union’s Venera 5 and 6 missions to Venus.
  • Far Outliers looks at the visit of U.S. Grant to Japan and China.
  • Gizmodo notes a recent analysis of Neanderthal teeth suggesting that they split with Homo sapiens at a date substantially earlier than commonly believed.
  • io9 notes the sheer scale of the Jonathan Hickman reboots for the X-Men comics of Marvel.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the argument of Ted Cruz that people should stop making fun of his “space pirate” suggestion.I am inclined to think Cruz more right than not, actually.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the wave of anti-black violence that hit the United States in 1919, often driven by returned veterans.
  • Language Hat shares a recognizable complaint, written in ancient Akkadian, of bad customers.
  • Language Log shares a report of a village in Brittany seeking people to decipher a mysterious etching.
  • This Scott Lemieux report at Lawyers, Guns and Money about how British conservatives received Ben Shapiro is a must-read summary.
  • Benjamin Markovits at the LRB Blog shares the reasons why he left his immigrant-heavy basketball team in Germany.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at one effort in Brazil to separate people from their street gangs.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how ISIS, deprived of its proto-state, has managed to thrive as a decentralized network.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences and perceptions of his native region of New England, in southeastern Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes how the Chang’e 4 rover may have found lunar mantle on the surface of the Moon.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that while Argentine president Mauricio Macri is polling badly, his opponents are not polling well.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a list of things to do in see in the Peru capital of Lima.
  • The Signal examines how the Library of Congress engages in photodocumentation.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal explains how he is helping native insects by planting native plants in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how scientific illiteracy should never be seen as cool.
  • Towleroad notes the questions of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as to why Truvada costs so much in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how family structures in the North Caucasus are at once modernizing and becoming more conservative.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how the distribution of US carriers and their fleets at present does not support the idea of a planned impending war with Iran.
  • Arnold Zwicky examines the tent caterpillar of California.

[NEWS] Ten LGBTQ links: crime, Toronto, Montréal, HIV/AIDS, in memoriam, education, sports, camp

  • Leo Mantha, the last man executed in British Columbia in 1959, was executing for killing his estranged lover. Was homophobia the cause of what was, even then, a unique lack of mercy? Global News considers.
  • Brian D. Johnson at MacLean’s, reviewing Killing Patient Zero, notes how the openness of Gaëtan Dugas about his sexual past was one feature that led him to be unfairly branded Patient Zero, cause of the HIV/AIDS crisis.
  • This invaluable Justin Ling AMA at reddit’s unresolvedmysteries about the Church-Wellesley serial killings, besides exposing the accidents that led police not following up on reports, highlights a historic worldwide pattern of rage-filled killing sprees against queer people.
  • Shaun Brodie at NOW Toronto pays tribute to the late, great writer Wayson Choy.
  • CTV News reports that the Québec National Assembly has extended official recognition of the historic importance of the Village gay of Montréal.
  • Phys.org links to a study suggesting that countries which extend civil rights to LGBTQ people experience higher economic growth as a result.
  • Peter Mendelsohn at Daily Xtra looks at homophobia in Canadian hockey, a factor that deters many queer people from playing the sport. Can it be easily dealt with?
  • Erica Lenti at Daily Xtra has a fantastic article looking at how gay-straight alliances at schools help young people learn how to be queer in a safe environment, providing them with the socialization they do not get elsewhere.
  • This lovely essay by wedding photographer Dana Koster at them explores, in general and in a specific example, the miracle and joys of legal same-sex marriage.
  • Elio Iannacci at Daily Xtra writes, in the wake of the Met gala, about the specifically queer nature of camp.