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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘separatism

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes a new study examining the evolution of giant planets.
  • Cody Delistraty has a nice essay about the power of coincidence in the human mind.
  • Dead Things reports on the possible discovery of hominin remains in China dating from 2.2 million years ago.
  • Language Hat notes the discovery of an ancient tablet in Greece dating from the 3rd century CE containing the earliest extract of The Odyssey so far found.
  • Language Log notes the importance of the language skills of a multilingual teen in leading to the rescue of the boys trapped in a Thai cave.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution imagines what friendship would be like in a world of telepathy.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis shares images taken by the Hayabusa2 probe of the asteroid Ryugu.
  • At Spacing, John Lorinc notes how the Ford government’s opposition to the clean energy policies of Wynne may well lead to the return of noticeable air pollution.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on Russian government actions intended to suppress what seems to be the spectre of separatism in Kaliningrad.
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[ISL] Five islands links: Toronto Islands, South Georgia, Haida Gwaii, Guadeloupe, New Caledonia

  • The Toronto Islands are open for business this year, hopefully without any hitches. (Let there not be unexpected flooding.) Global News reports.
  • The sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia has been freed from rat infestations, helping native life recover. National Geographic reports.
  • Killing invasive deer on Haida Gwaii is the task of recruited sharpshooters from New Zealand. MacLean’s reports.
  • Controversy over a new museum to slavery on the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe draws on all sorts of political and cultural and economic issues besetting the territory. The Atlantic reports.
  • The exact language of the question to be asked of voters in the New Caledonia referendum on independence, coming this year, is a critical question. The Lowy Institute examines the issue.

[NEWS] Five notes on federalism in Canada: Trans Mountain, Alberta, BC, commerce, Québec, federalism

  • CBC notes a Supreme Court of Canada ruling stating a New Brunswick law limiting the import of alcohol beverages from other provinces is constitutional.
  • Alberta is exceptionally unhappy that British Columbia is not permitting the construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline across its territory, to the point of making threats. Global News reports.
  • David Climenhaga at Rabble notes that the Albertan desire for federal intervention against British Columbia will likely work against the Albertans’ traditional interest in maximizing their autonomy.
  • Québec, though uninvolved in the Trans Mountain pipeline controversy, is starting to get involved on grounds of preserving provincial autonomy. CBC reports.
  • Jen Gerson at CBC notes that the fierceness of the interprovincial rivalry and the relative disengagement of the federal government suggests almost a weakening of the unity of Canada in the west.

Written by Randy McDonald

April 20, 2018 at 11:59 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • D-Brief notes that global climate change seems already to have altered the flow of the ocean current system including the Gulf Stream.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the dialect, and cultural forms, of American loggers.
  • Taika Waititi, director of (among other movies) Thor: Ragnarok, has created controversy by talking about racism in his native New Zealand. (Good for him, I’d say.) Lawyers, Guns and Money reports.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at a strange public apology by a Chinese company, and what this says about Chinese politics.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shared this map depicting the many ephemeral states that appeared in the former Russian Empire after the October Revolution.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that there are very good reasons to believe in dark matter and dark energy, that these concepts are not just a latter-day version of the aether.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the many ways in which the Siberian republic of Tuva is a political anomaly in Russia.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley uses data from the National Graduates Survey to take a look at student regret in Canadian universities. To what extent does it exist? What disciplines is it concentrated in?

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Ottawa, Markham, Moncton, Antwerp, San Francisco

  • The story of how the murder of Alain Brosseau by gay-bashers in Ottawa nearly thirty years ago led to lasting change is important to remember. The Ottawa Citizen reports.
  • This rather unique statue of a cow in Markham is still standing, despite neighbourhood discontent. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The closure of Saint-Louis-de-France Roman Catholic Church in Moncton surprises me somewhat, since Moncton is one of the few growing centres of the Maritimes. Global News reports.
  • The Belgian port city of Antwerp is looking to find some advantage from Brexit. Bloomberg reports.
  • The impact of sea level rise on San Francisco and the wider Bay area may be devastating. Wired reports.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new findings suggesting that the creation of cave art by early humans is product of the same skills that let early humans use language.
  • Davide Marchetti at Architectuul looks at some overlooked and neglected buildings in and around Rome.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait explains how Sirius was able to hide the brilliant Gaia 1 star cluster behind it.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at new procedures for streamlining the verification of new exoplanet detections.
  • Crooked Timber notes the remarkably successful and once-controversial eroticization of plant reproduction in the poems of Erasmus Darwin.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how an errant Confederate flag on a single nearly derailed the career of Otis Redding.
  • Detecting biosignatures from exoplanets, Bruce Dorminey notes, may require “fleets” of sensitive space-based telescopes.
  • Far Outliers looks at persecution of non-Shi’ite Muslims in Safavid Iran.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history of the enslavement of Native Americans in early colonial America, something often overlooked by later generations.
  • This video shared by Language Log, featuring two Amazon Echos repeating texts to each other and showing how these iterations change over time, is oddly fascinating.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Erik Loomis is quite clear about the good sense of Will Wilkinson’s point that controversy over “illegal” immigration is actually deeply connected to an exclusivist racism that imagines Hispanics to not be Americans.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, looks at the uses of the word “redemption”, particularly in the context of the Olympics.
  • The LRB Blog suggests Russiagate is becoming a matter of hysteria. I’m unconvinced, frankly.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map showing global sea level rise over the past decades.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for Americans to learn foreign languages on principle. As a Canadian who recently visited a decidedly Hispanic New York, I would add that Spanish, at least, is one language quite potentially useful to Americans in their own country.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about the striking photographs of Olivier Valsecchi.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, in the 2030s, gravitational wave observatories will be so sensitive that they will be able to detect black holes about to collide years in advance.
  • Towleroad lists festival highlights for New Orleans all over the year.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how recent changes to the Russian education system harming minority languages have inspired some Muslim populations to link their language to their religion.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell makes the case that Jeremy Corbyn, through his strength in the British House of Commons, is really the only potential Remainder who is in a position of power.

[ISL] Five islands links: Toronto Islands, Ireland, Sicily, Japan, Halligen Islands

  • blogTO notes that the Electric Island festival is slated to return to the Toronto Islands, after their wet 2017.
  • Politico.eu notes that the European Union is making the maintenance of integration on the island of Ireland a requirement for the UK if it wants a deal.
  • Jacobin Magazine shares a perfectly sensible article noting that the mafia of Sicily is intensely conservative, even reactionary, hardly deserving the romance with which it is too often represented.
  • The depopulation of Japan, often particularly intense in its smaller islands, is creating serious dilemmas. What is to be done with these remote, emptying-out, territories? The Japan Times reports.
  • The Halligen Islands of Germany’s Frisian coast, facing the North Sea and almost effaced every tide, sound like a charming place to visit. The Guardian reports.