A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘separatism

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

leave a comment »

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new findings suggesting that the creation of cave art by early humans is product of the same skills that let early humans use language.
  • Davide Marchetti at Architectuul looks at some overlooked and neglected buildings in and around Rome.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait explains how Sirius was able to hide the brilliant Gaia 1 star cluster behind it.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at new procedures for streamlining the verification of new exoplanet detections.
  • Crooked Timber notes the remarkably successful and once-controversial eroticization of plant reproduction in the poems of Erasmus Darwin.
  • Dangerous Minds notes how an errant Confederate flag on a single nearly derailed the career of Otis Redding.
  • Detecting biosignatures from exoplanets, Bruce Dorminey notes, may require “fleets” of sensitive space-based telescopes.
  • Far Outliers looks at persecution of non-Shi’ite Muslims in Safavid Iran.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history of the enslavement of Native Americans in early colonial America, something often overlooked by later generations.
  • This video shared by Language Log, featuring two Amazon Echos repeating texts to each other and showing how these iterations change over time, is oddly fascinating.
  • At Lawyers, Guns and Money, Erik Loomis is quite clear about the good sense of Will Wilkinson’s point that controversy over “illegal” immigration is actually deeply connected to an exclusivist racism that imagines Hispanics to not be Americans.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, looks at the uses of the word “redemption”, particularly in the context of the Olympics.
  • The LRB Blog suggests Russiagate is becoming a matter of hysteria. I’m unconvinced, frankly.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map showing global sea level rise over the past decades.
  • Marginal Revolution makes a case for Americans to learn foreign languages on principle. As a Canadian who recently visited a decidedly Hispanic New York, I would add that Spanish, at least, is one language quite potentially useful to Americans in their own country.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about the striking photographs of Olivier Valsecchi.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, in the 2030s, gravitational wave observatories will be so sensitive that they will be able to detect black holes about to collide years in advance.
  • Towleroad lists festival highlights for New Orleans all over the year.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how recent changes to the Russian education system harming minority languages have inspired some Muslim populations to link their language to their religion.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell makes the case that Jeremy Corbyn, through his strength in the British House of Commons, is really the only potential Remainder who is in a position of power.

[ISL] Five islands links: Toronto Islands, Ireland, Sicily, Japan, Halligen Islands

  • blogTO notes that the Electric Island festival is slated to return to the Toronto Islands, after their wet 2017.
  • Politico.eu notes that the European Union is making the maintenance of integration on the island of Ireland a requirement for the UK if it wants a deal.
  • Jacobin Magazine shares a perfectly sensible article noting that the mafia of Sicily is intensely conservative, even reactionary, hardly deserving the romance with which it is too often represented.
  • The depopulation of Japan, often particularly intense in its smaller islands, is creating serious dilemmas. What is to be done with these remote, emptying-out, territories? The Japan Times reports.
  • The Halligen Islands of Germany’s Frisian coast, facing the North Sea and almost effaced every tide, sound like a charming place to visit. The Guardian reports.

[NEWS] Five poltiics links: Doug Ford and Ontario, Tijuana-San Diego, Brexit, EU-Mercosur, Scotland

  • CBC looks at how the Doug Ford bid for Ontario PC leadership is potentially transformative of the race, potentially destabilizing the party at a time when it is vulnerable.
  • The tightly-integrated and hugely-profitable economy uniting San Diego with Tijuana, across the US-Mexican border, continues despite Trump. Bloomberg View reports.
  • A French minister has warned a Japanese audience that the United Kingdom is not going to be part of Europe any more. (France, he notes, remains open to business.) Bloomberg has it.
  • Efforts are redoubling to sign a trade deal between the EU and South American bloc Mercosur. Bloomberg reports.
  • Gerry Hassan is critical of the SNP and Scottish separatism, partly because of its lack of successful radicalism in power. The essay is at Open Democracy.

[URBAN NOTE] Five cities links: New York City, Cape Town, Calgary, Montréal, London

  • Justin Fox at Bloomberg View questions whether the strong economic growth of New York City, continuing from its 1970s nadir, can continue given underinvestment in infrastructure like transit.
  • CBC reports on the appalling scale of the Cape Town water crisis, made possible by a combination of rapid growth with sustained drought and terrible political responses.
  • Global News suggests that the IOC likes the surviving Olympics infrastructure in Calgary, so much so that it thinks this places the city in good position for a bid for the 2026 games. (Don’t do it, Calgary!)
  • This brief article in the Montreal Gazette talks about Chinese investors and migrants moving into the traditionally Anglo-dominated West Island. This is new to me: What is going on there, I wonder?
  • The Guardian considers a report commissioned by London and its mayor Sadiq Khan considering the possible cataclysmic impact of Brexit on the economy of that city. Will it happen, and under what conditions?

[NEWS] Five notes about frontiers: South Tyrol, Brexit, Alps, eastern Ukraine, Djibouti

  • Alessio Colonelli takes issue with the granting of a right to Austrian citizenship to only select residents of South Tyrol, over at Open Democracy.
  • Immigration to the United Kingdom may be falling, Bloomberg reports, but this is not to the advantage of the British economy.
  • Migrants trying to travel from Italy to France are unwittingly risking the terrible snow-bound conditions of the Alps. The National Post has the story.
  • Bloomberg View suggests one way forward for peace in eastern Ukraine. I’m not sure, frankly, that this is a plausible path (that there are any, even).
  • Politico Europe takes a look at the exceptional strategic importance of Djibouti for militaries around the world, the US and China included.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about a week of her life as a freelance writer, highlighting so much of her work relates to social connections as opposed to actual writing.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares an astonishingly prescient take by E.B. White on the power of television from 1938.
  • Hornet Stories notes the efforts of the Indonesian government to get the Google Play Store there to block 70 apps used by LGBT people.
  • At In a State of Migration, Lyman Stone looks at demographic trends in Hawaii, the other major insular possession of the United States. Low fertility and a high cost of living may actually lead to population decline there, too, in the foreseeable future.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death, at 59, of trailblazing gay comedian Bob Smith.
  • JSTOR Daily links/u> to a paper noting how Jewish resistance in the Warsaw Uprising played a critical role in shaping post-war Jewish identity.
  • Towleroad notes the announcement of an astonishingly preserved 1945 film clip showing gay men, out, at a pool party in 1945 Missouri.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one prominent Donbas separatists’ push for an aggressive response to the Ukrainian government over the collapse of Minsk, including an attempt to reclaim the remainder of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts from Kyiv.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • The Big Picture shares adorable photos of baby animals.
  • Multi-planet system K2-138 is one of the systems found via crowdsourcing, Centauri Dreams notes.
  • I did not know that David Bowie and Brian Eno visited the Gugging mental health clinic in Austria in 1994. Dangerous Minds has the photos.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Mike Pence has tried to defend himself from Adam Rippon’s criticisms by lying about his past.
  • Information is Beautiful shares an infographic depicting the edit wars last year on Wikipedia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Northern Ireland may get a referendum on marriage equality, giving it a chance to catch up to the Republic of Ireland and to the rest of the United Kingdom.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a vintage article noting that trying to apply the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, which could unseat a sitting president if the president was disabled, could cause a constitutional crisis.
  • Language Hat notes a study suggesting that, as humans become more sedentary, linguistic evidence suggests smell becomes less important.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders: how many films, how many novels, have been about _women_, not men, who are difficult geniuses? Where is the female equivalent of House?
  • The NYR Daily examines the Afro-futurism of 20th century novelist George Schuyler and his Black No More.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what someone would see as they descended into a black hole.
  • At Towleroad, Steven Petrow tells how HIV/AIDS doctor Mathilde Krim saved his life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one, militant, response in the Donbas republics to the breakdown of the Minsk Accords with Ukraine.