A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘european union

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • Andrew Barton quite approves of the Helsinki Metro.
  • Anthropology.net notes the complexity of the peopling of Eurasia, over hundreds of thousands of years and with multiple human populations.
  • Daily JSTOR has an insightful take on the fiction of the free market, looking back to Peter Drucker.
  • Far Outliers notes that the role missionaries played in the development of area studies.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at the complexities of the latest Brexit negotiations, concentrating on the DUP and Ireland.
  • At The Frailest Thing, Michael Sacasas notes the addition of a Paypal option alongside Patreon and asks for feedback.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the Gengoroh Tagame manga My Brother’s Husband is set for a television adaptation.
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexities surrounding a piece of Maoist rhetoric. Did Mao actually say that the Chinese people stood up at Tiannamen in 1949?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the rhetoric surrounding parkland in Utah. Who is it being protected for, and what do these people have to gain from the despoliation?
  • Marginal Revolution looks at a study of Switzerland suggesting that clear boundaries have helped maintain communal peace there.
  • At the NYR Daily, Tim Parks has a lovely essay exploring the importance of the translator as a sort of secondary creator.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Tatarstan, and argues post-Soviet governments there made a mistake by concentrating on parallel Tatar and Russian cultures, as opposed to propagating Tatar language and culture for all.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests that, in British political life, there are two working cultures, politicians who derive authority from merit and politicians who derive authority from brilliance. Guess who fares worse?
Advertisements

[NEWS] Four notes from distant corners: Corsica, Dominica, Scotland and Northern Ireland, Montenegro

leave a comment »

  • Nationalists, though not separatists, have done quite well in recent elections in Corsica. Bloomberg reports.
  • Dominica, ravaged by recent hurricanes, is preparing for an environmentally tumultuous future. The Inter Press Service reports.
  • Scotland, for one, is looking to Northern Ireland as a possible precedent for its relationship with the European Union. Bloomberg reports.
  • Balkanist takes a look at the potential impact the breakdown of relations between Russia and Montenegro might have on the small state, dependent on Russian tourism.

[NEWS] Five notes from islands: Fogo and Newfoundland, Puerto Rico, Ireland, Just Enough Island, PEI

leave a comment »

    Jessica Leeder reports on how, with the fragile recovery of the Newfoundland cod fisheries, Fogo Island is investigating the fisheries’ new potential, over at The Globe and Mail.

  • This Atlas Obscura feature takes a look at the endangered Puerto Rico parrot, the iguaca, facing dire conditions after Hurricane Maria.
  • Gerry Lynch makes the argument that, by torpedoing the Brexit agreement, the DUP and the Unionists have set the stage for eventual Irish reunification, over at Slugger O’Toole.
  • Atlas Obscura takes a quick look at Just Enough Island, one of the Thousand Islands in the St. Lawrence between Ontario and New York literally just big enough to support a cottage and two chairs in the front.
  • Éric Grenier suggests that, after the Green Party’s Hannah Bell won a byelection in Charlottetown, the Green Party should look to Atlantic Canada for breakthroughs, over at CBC.

[NEWS] Five links: Brexit, left-wing denialism, Menshevik Georgia, immigrants in cities, Voyager

leave a comment »

  • Prospect Magazine shares Ivan Rogers’ inside perspective on how David Cameron’s misunderstanding of the political priorities in the wider EU was (mostly) responsible for the ill-judged decision to hold a referendum on Brexit.
  • Haaretz shares Oz Katerji’s devastating criticism of many left-wing intellectuals for turning a blind eye to genocides they find politically inconvenient. (Noam Chomsky, stand up please.)
  • Eric Lee suggests that the moderate Menshevik government that ruled Georgia for a few brief years offers insight into a more humanistic way that the Russian Revolution could have taken, over at Open Democracy.
  • Irena Guidikova suggests that initiatives taken at the level of the cities are most important for the integration of immigrants, that helping them build networks and acquire social capital must be central to any project, over at Open Democracy.
  • Matt Novak at Gizmodo’s Paleofuture notes that, after substantial work, copies of the Voyager Golden Record are finally available for purchase.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross examines the connections between bitcoin production and the alt-right. Could cryptocurrency have seriously bad political linkages?
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes GW170680, a recent gravitational wave detection that is both immense in its effect and surprising for its detection being normal.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting hot Jupiters are so large because they are heated by their local star.
  • Crooked Timber counsels against an easy condemnation of baby boomers as uniquely politically malign.
  • Daily JSTOR notes one paper that takes a look at how the surprisingly late introduction of the bed, as a piece of household technology, changed the way we sleep.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1968 newspaper interview with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, talking about Charlie Manson and his family and their influence on him.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the opioid epidemic and the way that it is perceived.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell suggests that the unsolvable complexities of Northern Ireland may be enough to avoid a hard Brexit after all.
  • The LRB Blog describes a visit to a seaside village in Costa Rica where locals and visitors try to save sea turtles.
  • Lingua Franca reflects on the beauty of the Icelandic language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an awesome map depicting the locations of the stars around which we have detected exoplanets.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the ill health of North Korean defectors, infected with parasites now unseen in South Korea.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the revival of fonio, a West African grain that is now starting to see successful marketing in Senegal.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating book examining the functioning of urban villages embedded in the metropoli of south China.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious 1920 murder of famous bridge player Joseph Bowne Elwell.
  • Towleroad reports on Larnelle Foster, a gay black man who was a close friend of Meghan Markle in their college years.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although Ukraine suffered the largest number of premature dead in the Stalinist famines of the 1930s, Kazakhstan suffered the greatest proportion of dead.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell has a photo essay looking at the Berlin Brandenburg Airport, still years away from completion and beset by many complex failures of its advanced systems. What does the failure of this complex system say about others we may wish to build?

[NEWS] Four links about economies: the United Kingdom, Chile, Québec, Ontario

leave a comment »

  • Bloomberg notes that, in the era of Brexit, the United Kingdom is set to face prolonged recession. It may regain its 2007 levels of income only in 2025.
  • Chile is technically a high-income country, but not enough of one to escape the middle-income trap. Bloomberg View reports.
  • A Québec that is prosperous enough to no longer qualify for equalization payments may not be plausible, but the rhetoric around it makes good politics. MacLean’s reports.
  • The new $15 an hour minimum wage in Ontario is emerging as an election issue. The Toronto Star reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 25, 2017 at 9:45 pm

[NEWS] Five links on cities: Vancouver, Edmonton, Portland, Hull, central and eastern Europe

leave a comment »

  • A new housing policy in Vancouver will focus, among other things, on underused and housing in well-off neighbourhoods. Global News reports.
  • Can Edmonton’s Accidental Beach survive? Maybe, if federal regulation and the ever-shifting waters of the North Saskatchewan River permit. Global News reports.
  • Daily JSTOR links to a collection of articles explaining just how the Oregon city of Portland became a hipster mecca, here.
  • Alec Charles’ examination of the English city of Hull, a British City of Culture that is not only marginalized from mainstream Britain but at odds with the world (strongly pro-Brexit and all), is provocative. The article is here.
  • Politico.eu notes how the failure of central and eastern European cities to pick up new EU agencies after Brexit underlines, for many, their continuing marginalization in Europe.