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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘european union

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen argues compellingly that stories featuring queer protagonists should also have other queer characters (among other things).
  • James Bow talks about the origins and the progress of his new novel, The Sun Runners.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the recent hopeful analysis of Ross 128b, still a strong candidate for a relatively Earth-like world.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion on having elections in the European Parliament being based on transnational lists.
  • D-Brief notes a hauntingly musical study of the plasma of Saturn’s ring system.
  • Hornet Stories reports on N.K. Jemisin’s article that bigots are not good writers of fiction. I’m inclined to agree: People who cannot imagine the lives of others as legitimate have issues with plausible characterization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Nicola Sturgeon opened Pride in Glasgow on the same day as Trump’s visit, saying there was where she wanted to be regardless.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the winding history of New York State’s Adirondacks, as a protected area.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the evidence for the unwitting involvement of Glenn Greenwald and Wikileaks as agents of Russia in support of Trump.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, considers the genesis of the phrase “Sherpas of the Beltway.” How problematic is it?
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that Canadian public opinion in support of open immigration rests on borders being controlled.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the strange behaviour of Boyajian’s Star can be explained by dust alone.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates that Russia might be on the verge of another wave of regional reorganizations, amalgamating some provinces and other territories into others.
  • Arnold Zwicky points out the achievements of Samantha Allen, a journalist writing for The Daily Beast.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthro{dendum}’s Adam Fish looks at the phenomenon of permissionless innovation as part of a call for better regulation.
  • James Bow shares excerpts from his latest book, The Cloud Riders.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how data from Voyager 1’s cosmic ray detectors has been used to study dark matter.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money begins a dissection of what Roe vs Wade meant, and means, for abortion in the United States, and what its overturn might do.
  • Ilan Stavans, writing for Lingua Franca at the Chronicle, considers the languages of the World Cup. The prominence of Spanish in the United States is particularly notable.
  • The LRB Blog gathers together articles referencing the now-departed Boris Johnson. What a man.
  • The Map Room Blog reports/u> on Matthew Blackett’s remarkably intricate transit map of Canada.
  • Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution links to a study from Nature exploring how shifts in the definition of concepts like racism and sexism means that, even as many of the grossest forms disappear, racism and sexism continue to be recognized if in more minute form.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how a Japanese experiment aimed at measuring proton decay ended up inaugurating the era of neutrino astronomy, thanks to SN1987A.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on how a Russian proposal to resettle Afrikaner farmers from South Africa to the North Caucasus (!) is, unsurprisingly, meeting with resistance from local populations, including non-Russian ones.
  • Linguist Arnold Zwicky takes a look at how, exactly, one learns to use the F word.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy notes the discovery of a distant exoplanet, orbiting subgiant EPIC248847494, with an orbit ten years long.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the latest discoveries regarding Ceres’ Occator Crater, a place with a cryovolcanic past.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a brilliant early galaxy, the brightest so far found, P352-15.
  • Dangerous Minds shares an extended interview with Françoise Hardy.
  • Far Outliers notes how, during the later Cold War, cash-desperate Soviet bloc governments allowed hopeful emigrants for countries in the West to depart only if these governments paid a ransom for them.
  • Hornet Stories has a nice feature on Enemies of Dorothy, a LGBT sketch comedy group with a political edge. I saw some of their clips; I’m following them.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at some of the features uniting celebratory music festival Coachella with Saturnalia, fitting the former into an ancient tradition.
  • Language Hat reports on researchers studying the development of emojis. Are they becoming components of a communications system with stable meanings?
  • Marginal Revolution reports on how mobile money is becoming a dominant element in the economy of Somaliland.
  • Justine Petrone at North reports on the things that were, and were not, revealed about his family’s ancestry through DNA testing.
  • Melissa Chadburn writes at the NYR Daily about the food she ate growing up as a poor child, and its meaning for her then and now in a time of growing inequality.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a woman’s experience drinking samsu, a clear rice liqueur, in Malacca.
  • Drew Rowsome raves over David Kingston Yeh’s debut novel, the queer Toronto-themed The Boy at the Edge of the World.
  • Window on Eurasia quotes a Russian observer who suggests that Trump’s attempt to disrupt the European Union, even if successful, might simply help make Germany into a strategic competitor to the United States (with benefits for other powers).

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Adam Fish at Anthro{dendum} takes a look at the roles of drones in capitalism, here.
  • Bad Astronomy talks about the discovery of a nascent planet in orbit of young star PDS 70.
  • Centauri Dreams notes what the discovery of a Charon eclipsing its partner Pluto meant, for those worlds and for astronomy generally.
  • D-Brief notes a demographic study of Italian centenarians suggesting that, after reaching the age of 105, human mortality rates seem to plateau. Does this indicate the potential for further life expectancy increases?
  • Dead Things shares the result of a genetics study of silkworms. Where did these anchors of the Silk Road come from?
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the role of the side hustle in creative professions.
  • Far Outliers reports on the time, in the 1930s, when some people in Second Republic Poland thought that the country should acquire overseas colonies.
  • Hornet Stories reports on how, in earlier centuries, the English word “pinke” meant a shade of yellow.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how, nearly two decades later, Sex and the City is still an influential and important piece of pop culture.
  • Language Hat links to Keith Gessen’s account, in The New Yorker, about how he came to teach his young son Russian.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, reports on the decent and strongly Cuban Spanish spoken by Ernest Hemingway.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the mystique surrounding testosterone, the powerful masculinizing hormone.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer shares his thoughts on the election, in Mexico, of left-leaning populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Worst-case scenarios aren’t likely to materialize in the short and medium terms, at least.
  • Vintage Space notes how, at the height of the Cold War, some hoped to demonstrate American strength by nuking the Moon. (Really.)
  • Window on Eurasia links to an essayist who suggests that Russia should look to America as much as to Europe for models of society.

[NEWS] Five language links: English, French, Gaelic, Cantonese, Russian

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Markham, Hamilton, Rotterdam, Hambantota, Warsaw

  • In response to a desire to remove an almost bizarre controversial statue of a cow from its location in a neighbourhood in Markham, the owner has sued the city for $C 4 million. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The mayor of Hamilton, Ontario, would like housing incorporated into shopping malls, to deal with issues of housing and retail in one go. Global News reports.
  • Brexit threatens to decidedly destabilize the picture for the Dutch port city of Rotterdam. The Independent reports.
  • Bloomberg notes that the controversial Chinese-owned port of Hambantota, in Sri Lanka, is doing terrible business.
  • Newly-discovered documents provide confirmation of the belief that the Nazis planned to utterly destroy Warsaw. The National Post reports.

[ISL] Five islands links: Malta, East Timor, Choctaw, Ireland, April Fool’s Day

  • Malta, it seems from this New Statesman take, is facing serious problems of corruption through its role in international finance.
  • The establishment of a new maritime border between Australia and East Timor threatens Australia’s borders with adjacent Indonesia. ABC reports.
  • Ireland has established a scholarship program for Choctaw students as a sign of thanks for Choctaw aid during the Irish Potato Famine. The Irish Post reports.
  • This Slugger O’Toole article suggests that the disparity in living standards and income between the Republic and Northern Ireland is not nearly so vast as GDP would suggest.
  • The Map Room Blog shared this Ordinance Survey’s April Fool’s Day joke, of a fake but realistic island.