A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘museums

[BLOG] Five NYR Daily links (@nyrdaily)

  • Claire Messud writes at the NYR Daily about two art exhibits concerned with borders.
  • Caitlin Chandler writes at the NYR Daily about the state of the experiment of Germany with mass reception and integration of refugees.
  • The NYR Daily explores the modern Russian history of state-sponsored murder outside of its frontiers.
  • Moroccan writer Hisham Aldi writes at NYR Daily about his relationship with Paul Bowles.
  • The NYR Daily reports on a remarkable exhibit at the Barbican in London of notable nightclubs in 20th century culture.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul visits the studio of Barbas Lopes Arquitectos in Lisbon, here.
  • Bad Astronomer takes a look at a new paper examining the effectiveness of different asteroid detection technologies, including nuclear weapons.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting potentially habitable planets orbiting Alpha Centauri B, smaller of the two stars, could suffer from rapid shifts of their axes.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber argues some polls suggest some American conservatives really would prefer Russia as a model to California.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery, by the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia, of 27 supernova remnants in our galaxy.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about stealth aircraft, here.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting that DNA is but one of very very many potential genetic molecules.
  • Language Hat shares a reevaluation of the Richard Stanyhurst translation of the Aeneid, with its manufactured words. Why mightn’t this have been not mockable but rather creative?
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrated the 50th anniversary of the takeover of Alcatraz Island by Native American activists.
  • Chris Bertram writes at the LRB Blog, after the catastrophe of the Essex van filled with dozens of dead migrants, about the architecture of exclusion that keeps out migrants.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a comment looking at the fentanyl crisis from a new angle.
  • Jenny Uglow writes at the NYR Daily about a Science Museum exhibit highlighting the dynamic joys of science and its progress over the centuries.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes a look at the question of how to prevent the wildfires currently raging in Australia. What could have been done, what should be done?
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on proposals from China for two long-range probe missions to interstellar space, including a Neptune flyby.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the wonderfully innocent Pinocchio currently playing at the Young People’s Theatre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the evidence for the universe, maybe, being closed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Alexandria Patriarchate is the next Orthodox body to recognize the Ukrainian church.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at irregular versus regular, as a queer word too.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto notes

  • Matt Gurney wonders if the losses of votes for the Conservatives in the Greater Toronto Area will doom Andrew Scheer, over at the National Post.
  • Jamie Bradburn took a look at the opening of the Ontario Science Centre, here.
  • Spacing shares an argument for density transition zones in Toronto, here.
  • The Village Idiot Pub in Toronto, across Dundas from the AGO, will rebrand itself the Village Genius. Global News reports.
  • Queen and Coxwell will soon host some new affordable housing. Global News reports.
  • The closure of a flea market on Old Weston road, a year after a tragic shooting, is a shame. The Toronto Star
  • I am going to see at least some of the works in this year’s Toronto Biennial. NOW Toronto reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Toronto Queer Theatre Festival, Junction, Shevchenko, 1926, suicide

  • Drew Rowsome reviews the offerings at the Toronto Queer Theatre Festival, here.
  • blogTO notes the displeasure of the Junction at the removal of a wooden train platform, become a community hub, for condo construction.
  • Bloor West Village, blogTO notes, hosts a museum–newly reopened in a new location–devoted to the poetry of Taras Shevchenko.
  • Jamie Bradburn looks at vintage Toronto ads, these from the parties contending 1926 federal election.
  • In this long-form CBC feature, Ioanna Roumeliotis writes about the new things the TTC is doing to try to prevent suicides on the subway tracks.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Toronto links: politics, transit, pop culture, photos

  • CBC Toronto bids farewell, fittingly at TCAF time, to the iconic Jason Loo Toronto comic series The Pitiful Human-Lizard.
  • At blogTO, Tanya Mok reports on the resistance of tenants at 54-56 Kensington Avenue to an illegal eviction order by their landlord.
  • The Toronto Star reports</u. on a new matchmaking event intended to connect future roommates to each other.
  • Kevin Ritchie at NOW Toronto reports on how a new pricing scheme for the AGO, including a $35 annual pass for people over 25, reflects a push to try to get more people into museums.
  • Glenn Sumi writes at NOW Toronto about the increasingly steep price of ticket prices for live theatre in Toronto.
  • Toronto Life shares photos from an exhibit, by Patrick Cummins and Ivaan Kotulsky, of Queen Street West in the 1980s and 1990s.
  • Richard Longley writes at NOW Toronto about the emptying of an old warehouse of collectibles and oddities on Wabush, part of the decline of old storied Toronto.
  • Toronto Life shares more photos from outdoor market Stackt, at Front and Bathurst.
  • Steve Munro starts to analyse traffic patterns on the 501 Queen streetcar, looking first at the Neville Loop end.
  • NOW Toronto is one of a few news sources to report on Scarborough writer Téa Mutonji and her new short story collection Shut Up, You’re Pretty.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the importance of complete rest.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at the contributions of ordinary people to Alzheimer’s research.
  • The Crux notes how recent planetary scientists acknowledge Venus to be an interestingly active world.
  • D-Brief notes the carnivorous potential of pandas.
  • Cody Delistraty considers a British Library exhibit about writing.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that, in red giant systems, life released from the interiors of thawed outer-system exomoons might produce detectable signatures in these worlds’ atmospheres.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares reports of some of the latest robot developments from around the world.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the concepts of gentrification and meritocracy.
  • Gizmodo notes a running dinosaur robot that indicates one route by which some dinosaurs took to flight.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox talks about bringing some principles of Wendell Berry to a town hall discussion in Sterling, Kansas.
  • io9 notes that a reboot of Hellraiser is coming from David S. Goyer.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how museums engage in the deaccessioning of items in their collections.
  • Language Log examines the Mongolian script on the renminbi bills of China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Volkswagen in the United States is making the situation of labour unions more difficult.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the effective lack of property registration in the casbah of Algiers.
  • The NYR Daily notes the Afrofuturism of artist Devan Shinoyama.
  • Strange Company examines the trial of Jane Butterfield in the 1770s for murdering the man who kept her as a mistress with poison. Did she do it? What happened to her?
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes a controversial map identifying by name the presidents of the hundred companies most closely implicated in climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian Orthodox Church, retaliating against the Ecumenical Patriarchy for its recognition of Ukrainian independence, is moving into Asian territories outside of its purview.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts a rumination by looking at the sportswear of the early 20th century world.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links: 1919, condos, Long Branch, transit, Walk-Up Weekdays, sakura

  • Jamie Bradburn shares some editorials from Toronto newspapers in 1919 reacting to the city’s general strike.
  • CBC Toronto reports on the growing number of 311 complaints about short-term rentals in many condo complexes, like the Ice Condos.
  • blogTO profiles an excellent-looking condo at 1100 Lansdowne Avenue, on Lansdowne near Davenport.
  • Tess Kalinowski writes at the Toronto Star about controversies in Long Branch regarding lot severance. How can this old community densify?
  • Edward Keenan writes at the Toronto Star about the point that a transit shelter enclosed on four sides did not make, and the point that it did perhaps make inadvertantly.
  • The Toronto Public Library announces its Walk-Up Weekdays program, where this month possession of a library card can give someone free admission to a city museum.
  • The Toronto cherry blossom festival in High Park will start this weekend, with road closures starting Saturday. Global News reports.