A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘museums

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Toronto Queer Theatre Festival, Junction, Shevchenko, 1926, suicide

leave a comment »

  • Drew Rowsome reviews the offerings at the Toronto Queer Theatre Festival, here.
  • blogTO notes the displeasure of the Junction at the removal of a wooden train platform, become a community hub, for condo construction.
  • Bloor West Village, blogTO notes, hosts a museum–newly reopened in a new location–devoted to the poetry of Taras Shevchenko.
  • Jamie Bradburn looks at vintage Toronto ads, these from the parties contending 1926 federal election.
  • In this long-form CBC feature, Ioanna Roumeliotis writes about the new things the TTC is doing to try to prevent suicides on the subway tracks.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Toronto links: politics, transit, pop culture, photos

  • CBC Toronto bids farewell, fittingly at TCAF time, to the iconic Jason Loo Toronto comic series The Pitiful Human-Lizard.
  • At blogTO, Tanya Mok reports on the resistance of tenants at 54-56 Kensington Avenue to an illegal eviction order by their landlord.
  • The Toronto Star reports</u. on a new matchmaking event intended to connect future roommates to each other.
  • Kevin Ritchie at NOW Toronto reports on how a new pricing scheme for the AGO, including a $35 annual pass for people over 25, reflects a push to try to get more people into museums.
  • Glenn Sumi writes at NOW Toronto about the increasingly steep price of ticket prices for live theatre in Toronto.
  • Toronto Life shares photos from an exhibit, by Patrick Cummins and Ivaan Kotulsky, of Queen Street West in the 1980s and 1990s.
  • Richard Longley writes at NOW Toronto about the emptying of an old warehouse of collectibles and oddities on Wabush, part of the decline of old storied Toronto.
  • Toronto Life shares more photos from outdoor market Stackt, at Front and Bathurst.
  • Steve Munro starts to analyse traffic patterns on the 501 Queen streetcar, looking first at the Neville Loop end.
  • NOW Toronto is one of a few news sources to report on Scarborough writer Téa Mutonji and her new short story collection Shut Up, You’re Pretty.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the importance of complete rest.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at the contributions of ordinary people to Alzheimer’s research.
  • The Crux notes how recent planetary scientists acknowledge Venus to be an interestingly active world.
  • D-Brief notes the carnivorous potential of pandas.
  • Cody Delistraty considers a British Library exhibit about writing.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that, in red giant systems, life released from the interiors of thawed outer-system exomoons might produce detectable signatures in these worlds’ atmospheres.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares reports of some of the latest robot developments from around the world.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the concepts of gentrification and meritocracy.
  • Gizmodo notes a running dinosaur robot that indicates one route by which some dinosaurs took to flight.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox talks about bringing some principles of Wendell Berry to a town hall discussion in Sterling, Kansas.
  • io9 notes that a reboot of Hellraiser is coming from David S. Goyer.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how museums engage in the deaccessioning of items in their collections.
  • Language Log examines the Mongolian script on the renminbi bills of China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Volkswagen in the United States is making the situation of labour unions more difficult.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the effective lack of property registration in the casbah of Algiers.
  • The NYR Daily notes the Afrofuturism of artist Devan Shinoyama.
  • Strange Company examines the trial of Jane Butterfield in the 1770s for murdering the man who kept her as a mistress with poison. Did she do it? What happened to her?
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes a controversial map identifying by name the presidents of the hundred companies most closely implicated in climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian Orthodox Church, retaliating against the Ecumenical Patriarchy for its recognition of Ukrainian independence, is moving into Asian territories outside of its purview.
  • Arnold Zwicky starts a rumination by looking at the sportswear of the early 20th century world.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links: 1919, condos, Long Branch, transit, Walk-Up Weekdays, sakura

  • Jamie Bradburn shares some editorials from Toronto newspapers in 1919 reacting to the city’s general strike.
  • CBC Toronto reports on the growing number of 311 complaints about short-term rentals in many condo complexes, like the Ice Condos.
  • blogTO profiles an excellent-looking condo at 1100 Lansdowne Avenue, on Lansdowne near Davenport.
  • Tess Kalinowski writes at the Toronto Star about controversies in Long Branch regarding lot severance. How can this old community densify?
  • Edward Keenan writes at the Toronto Star about the point that a transit shelter enclosed on four sides did not make, and the point that it did perhaps make inadvertantly.
  • The Toronto Public Library announces its Walk-Up Weekdays program, where this month possession of a library card can give someone free admission to a city museum.
  • The Toronto cherry blossom festival in High Park will start this weekend, with road closures starting Saturday. Global News reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Montréal, Sudbury, Québec City, Los Angeles

  • Hamilton is coming up with new strategies to better manage its alleyways. Global News reports.
  • The McCord Museum in Montréal is scheduled to enjoy an impressive new expansion in coming years. CBC Montreal reports.
  • This CBC Ideas feature looks at how Sudbury, once an industrial wasteland, has been carefully and effectively regreened over the past few decades.
  • La Presse reports that majorities in Québec City are in favour of streetcar construction.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares this food map of Los Angeles.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the many galaxies in the night sky caught mid-collision.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the plan of China to send a probe to explore near-Earth co-orbital asteroid 2016 HO3 and comet 133P.
  • Gizmodo reports, with photos, on the progress of the Chang’e 4 and the Yutu 2 rover, on the far side of the Moon.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Bill de Blasio hopes to ban new steel-and-glass skyscrapers in New York City, part of his plan to make the metropolis carbon-neutral.
  • JSTOR Daily notes a critique of the BBC documentary Planet Earth, arguing the series was less concerned with representing the environment and more with displaying HD television technology.
  • Language Hat notes the oddities of the name of St. Marx Cemetery in Vienna. How did “Mark” get so amusingly changed?
  • Language Log looks at how terms for horse-riding might be shared among Indo-European languages and in ancient Chinese.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the grounds for the workers of New York’s Tenement Museum to unionize.
  • The NYR Daily notes the efforts of Barnard College Ancient Drama, at Columbia University, to revive Greek drama in its full with music and dance, starting with a Euripedes performance.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares some iconic images of the Earth from space for Earth Day.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Neon Museum, renovictions, Y&E, ROM, Room With A View

  • Jamie Bradburn was decidedly unimpressed by the Neon Museum at Junction House.
  • Renovictions are a real concern for many renters in Toronto, already living on the edges of their budgets. CBC reports.
  • Urban Toronto notes an interesting consolidation of two development plans into one at Yonge and Eglinton, here.
  • blogTO notes how the Royal Ontario Museum is now going to offer free admission every third Monday of the month.
  • Natalia Manzocco writes at NOW Toronto about how the Room With A View pop-up restaurant underneath the Gardiner Expressway ended up triggering city concerns over housing.