A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘extraterrestrial life

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of activity on distant comet
    C/2017 K2.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new proposal for an orbital telescope that could detect Earth-like worlds at Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • D-Brief notes a new research finding that chimpanzees can learn to use tools on their own, without teaching.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the interesting Detroit character of Gundella, the Green Witch of Detroit.
  • Language Log tries to decipher some garbled Hebrew at an American wedding.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the continued aftershocks, social and otherwise, from the recent earthquake in Mexico.
  • Marginal Revolution argues that North Korea is set to become more China’s problem than the United States’.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple pleasures of soy milk in China.
  • Seriously Science notes a study looking at the different factors in the personalities of cats.
  • Towleroad notes the recent discovery of an antibody effective against 99% or so variants of HIV.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russian politics play a central role in getting Russophones in Ukraine to become Ukrainian.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that asteroid 2006 VW139 is not just also a comet but a binary object, too, while Centauri Dreams also reports on 288P. (Multiple names, here.)
  • D-Brief reports on a study intended to answer the question of whether or not our galaxy is normal.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper suggesting TRAPPIST-1 might provide a threatening environment for its planets, links to another simulatingthe environments of TRAPPIST-1 planets to find d most likely to be Earth-like, and links to another finding that panspermia between the different planets of TRAPPIST-1 would be quite easy.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Douglas Merrill notes one study of AfD voters finding former non-voters contributed most to its vote surge.
  • Hornet Stories notes an anti-gay “Straight Lives Matter” gathering in Australia that got only 30 protesters.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a crowdsourced map showing earthquake damage in Mexico.
  • The New APPS Blog considers Foucault and Marx and their thinking about spare time, and its reduction to capital.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the recent German election and the rise of the AfD.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a proposal for a solar sail deployment on the new Deep Space Gateway station.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel has a fairly critical, but I think ultimately hopeful, review of the first episodes of Star Trek: Discovery.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that the latest Trump travel ban has many of the same fatal flaws as the others.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the Instagram account “Boys With Plants.”

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Centauri Dreams links to archival video painstakingly collected from the Voyager missions.
  • Citizen Science Salon notes ways ordinary people can use satellite imagery for archaeological purposes.
  • Good news: Asian carp can’t find a fin-hold in Lake Michigan. Bad news: The lake is so food-deprived nothing lives there. The Crux reports.
  • D-Brief notes that, once every second, a fast radio burst occurs somewhere in the universe.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the psychedelic retro-futurism of Swedish artist Kilian Eng.
  • Dead Things notes the recovery of ancient human DNA from some African sites, and what this could mean for study.
  • Cody Delistraty reconsiders the idea of the “coming of age” narrative. Does this make sense now that we have abandoned the idea of a unitary self?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the evolution of icy bodies around different post-main sequence stars.
  • The Great Grey Bridge’s Philip Turner notes anti-Putin dissident Alexei Navalny.
  • Hornet Stories notes reports of anti-gay persecution in Azerbaijan.
  • Language Log takes a look at the dialectal variations of southern Ohio.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money starts a discussion about what effective disaster relief for Puerto Rico would look like.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the aftermath of the recent earthquake in Mexico, and the story of the buried girl who was not there.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Toronto real estate companies, in light of rent control, are switching rental units over to condos.
  • Naked Anthropologist Laura Agustín takes a look at the origins and stories of migrant sex workers.
  • The NYR Daily talks about the supposedly unthinkable idea of nuclear war in the age of Trump.
  • Drew Rowsome gives a strongly positive–and deserved review to the Minmar Gaslight show The Seat Next to the King, a Fringe triumph now playing at the Theatre Centre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how so many outer-system icy worlds have liquid water.
  • Towleroad features Jim Parsons’ exploration of how important is for him, as a gay man, to be married.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian language policy limiting minority languages in education could backfire, and wonders if Islamization one way people in an urbanizing North Caucasus are trying to remain connected to community.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.
  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.
  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of “The Ballad of the Green Berets”.
  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.
  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans’ habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, “My Immortal”, has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)
  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.
  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry’s Auroville Café.
  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.
  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.

[NEWS] Four blogospheric links about the achievements of Saturn probe Cassini

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait celebrates the many achievements of Saturn probe Cassini in its two-decade lifespan, with images.
  • Centauri Dreams took a look at Cassini on its final approach to Saturn, having passed Titan.
  • The Crux interviews a Cassini scientist who, after the probe, would be surprised if Enceladus does not have life.
  • D-Brief bid a fond farewell to Cassini.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 15, 2017 at 3:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.
  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes’ analysis of Forbidden Planet.
  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.
  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas–hence, new sources of economic growth–are harder to come by.
  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.
  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia’s Asian territories.