A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘military

[PHOTO] Lampost beneath the Prince Edward Battery, Charlottetown

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Lamppost beneath the Prince Edward Battery #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #lamppost #latergram

Below the Prince Edward Battery lies a boardwalk that runs the length of Victoria Park’s coastline. When you look up, you can just see the Canadian flag that flies above, and one of the wood-lined ports for the cannons.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 27, 2016 at 2:00 pm

[PHOTO] Nine photos from the Prince Edward Battery, Charlottetown

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In January of 2014, I shared photos from Prince Edward Battery. I came back this summer.

Located roughly in the middle of Charlottetown’s Victoria Park, it had been for most of the 19th century Charlottetown’s military outpost guarding the harbour against intruders. The departure of British forces from the Island led to the site’s incorporation into Charlottetown’s main park in 1905 upon the departure of British forces from Prince Edward Island. This military outpost that never saw a battle is a restful place to wander.

Towards the Prince Edward Battery #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram

Towards the gate #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram

The cannons #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #cannon

Plaque #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram

Cannonry #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #cannon

Aimed #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #cannon #charlottetownharbour

Blockhouse #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram

Harbour below #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #charlottetownharbour

From the west #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #skyline

Written by Randy McDonald

September 26, 2016 at 1:17 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers Juno’s photos of Jupiter’s poles.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the discovery of another star that behaves much like mysterious Tabby’s Star.
  • Far Outliers reports on the good reputation of the Chinese forces at Shanghai in 1937.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a Christian site that claims gay sex is not sex.
  • Language Hat reports on the problems of translating Elena Ferrante.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money and Noel Maurer are unimpressed by Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson.
  • The New APPS Blog writes against faculty lock-outs.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw describes the Parers, a Catalan-Australian family.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Ukraine’s recognition of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, reports on how Russians resent Ukrainian refugees, and suggests the Russian economic crisis is finally hitting Moscow and St. Petersburg.

[URBAN NOTE] “Is it time to rethink Toronto’s air show?”

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I wonder. From CBC’s Metro Morning:

It’s the sound of the city this weekend: the roar of planes overhead as the Canadian International Air Show features vintage and modern planes in aerial displays. It’s been running since 1949, and draws thousands of people to the waterfront.

Some people love the spectacle; others hate the disruption, or object to the military display.

But for some in the city it can also have an unsettling, perhaps even traumatic, effect.

Maya Bastian is a writer and filmmaker with family roots in Sri Lanka. In 2009, as the war in that country was ending, she went there to work in conflict zones. “I had never seen anything like it,” she told CBC Metro Morning’s Matt Galloway.

Bastian returned at the end of the summer, shortly before that year’s air show. Standing out on the street, “any time a plane flew over I was paralyzed, I couldn’t move … I was reliving a lot of the things that I saw and experienced and heard in that moment.”

Written by Randy McDonald

September 3, 2016 at 3:59 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond notes some anti-drone activists’ efforts to get drones controlled.
  • blogTO reports on the history of the strip mall in Toronto, looks at the abandoned Whitney Block Tower by Queen’s Park, and reports from the attic of Queen’s Park.
  • Discover‘s Body Horrors notes the possibility that global warming might lead to the reemergence of anthrax from the Siberian wastes.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the discovery of exocometary gas in the debris ring of HD 181327.
  • Far Outliers notes the brutality in the Japanese naval academy and reassesses Admiral Yamamoto.
  • Noel Power at The Power and the Money looks at inequality in American history, after Piketty’s arguments.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an interesting art installation in Charlottetown, of floating tents.
  • Savage Minds describes the “silo effect” besetting organizations.
  • Torontoist reports on the first game of cricket in Toronto.

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • Bloomberg talks about Poland’s problems with economic growth, notes that McMansions are poor investments, considers what to do about the Olympics post-Rio, looks at new Japanese tax incentives for working women, looks at a French war museum that put its stock up for sale, examines the power of the New Zealand dairy, looks at the Yasukuni controversies, and notes Huawei’s progress in China.
  • Bloomberg View is hopeful for Brazil, argues demographics are dooming Abenomics, suggests ways for the US to pit Russia versus Iran, looks at Chinese fisheries and the survival of the ocean, notes that high American population growth makes the post-2008 economic recovery relatively less notable, looks at Emperor Akihito’s opposition to Japanese remilitarization, and argues that Europe’s soft response to terrorism is not a weakness.
  • CBC notes that Russian doping whistleblowers fear for their lives, looks at how New Brunswick farmers are adapting to climate change, and looks at how Neanderthals’ lack of facility with tools may have doomed them.
  • The Globe and Mail argues Ontario should imitate Michigan instead of Québec, notes the new Anne of Green Gables series on Netflix, and predicts good things for Tim Horton’s in the Philippines.
  • The Guardian notes that Canada’s impending deal with the European Union is not any model for the United Kingdom.
  • The Inter Press Service looks at child executions in Iran.
  • MacLean’s notes that Great Lakes mayors have joined to challenge a diversion of water from their shared basin.
  • National Geographic looks at the elephant ivory trade, considers the abstract intelligence of birds, considers the Mayan calendar’s complexities, and looks at how the young generation treats Pluto’s dwarf planet status.
  • The National Post notes that VIA Rail is interested in offering a low-cost bus route along the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia.
  • Open Democracy notes that the last Russian prisoner in Guantanamo does not want to go home, and wonders why the West ignores the Rwandan dictatorship.
  • TVO considers how rural communities can attract immigrants.
  • Universe Today suggests sending our digital selves to the stars, looks at how cirrus clouds kept early Mars warm and wet, and notes the discovery of an early-forming direct-collapse black hole.
  • Variance Explained looks at how Donald Trump’s tweets clearly show two authors at work.
  • The Washignton Post considers what happens when a gay bar becomes a bar with more general appeal.
  • Wired notes that the World Wide Web still is far from achieving its founders’ dreams, looks at how news apps are dying off, and reports on the Univision purchase of Gawker.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Bloomberg notes the closure of Poland’s frontier with Kaliningrad, looks at how Google is beating out Facebook in helping India get connected to the Internet, notes British arms makers’ efforts to diversify beyond Europe and examines the United Kingdom’s difficult negotiations to get out of the European Union, looks at the problems of investing in Argentina, looks at the complications of Germany’s clean energy policy, observes that the Israeli government gave the schools of ultra-Orthodox Jews the right not to teach math and English, examines the consequences of terrorism on French politics, and examines at length the plight of South Asian migrant workers in the Gulf dependent on their employers.
  • Bloomberg View notes Donald Trump’s bromance with Putin’s Russia, examines Melania Trump’s potential immigrant problems, and is critical of Thailand’s new anti-democratic constitution.
  • CBC looks at how some video stores in Canada are hanging on.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that the Olympic Games marks the end of a decade of megaprojects in Brazil.
  • MacLean’s approves of the eighth and final book in the Harry Potter series.
  • The National Post reports on a Ukrainian proposal to transform Chernobyl into a solar farm, and examines an abandoned plan to use nuclear weapons to unleash Alberta’s oil sands.
  • Open Democracy looks at the relationship between wealth and femicide in India, fears a possible coup in Ukraine, looks at the new relationship between China and Africa, examines the outsized importance of Corbyn to Britain’s Labour Party, and looks how Armenia’s defeat of Azerbaijan has given its veterans outsized power.
  • Universe Today notes proposals for colonizing Mercury, looks at strong support in Hawaii for a new telescope, and examines the progenitor star of SN 1987A.
  • Wired emphasizes the importance of nuclear weapons and deterrence for Donald Trump, and looks at how many cities around the world have transformed their rivers.