A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘social sciences

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.
  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans’ habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.
  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, “My Immortal”, has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.
  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)
  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.
  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.
  • Livejournal’s pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry’s Auroville Café.
  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.
  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.
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[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers the difficulties of the anthropologist in the context of a world where their knowledges are monetized.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days she spent in Montréal, with photos.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about the justice, or lack thereof, in Harvard denying convicted murderer Michelle Jones entry into their doctoral program now that her sentence is over.
  • D-Brief looks at the changing nature of the global disease burden, and its economic consequences.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that Equifax’s terribly lax data protection should mark the endgame for them.
  • The Map Room Blog considers the use of earth-observer satellites to predict future disease outbreaks (malaria, here, in Peru).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how quantum mechanics helps explain nuclear fusion in our sun.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a report that Muscovites live on average 12 years longer than non-Muscovite Russians.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers what, exactly, anthropology majors can do job-wise with their degrees. Interesting ideas.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible origins of cometary organics in deep space.
  • Hornet Stories talks of anti-immigrant Americans with immigrant ancestors who skirted relevant laws themselves, like Donald Trump.
  • Language Hat considers byssus, an exotic ancient textile and a word with a complex history.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how the potential for disaster in Florida is worsened by poor planning.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the sad intersection of war, xenophobia, and rising rates of polio in Pakistan (and elsewhere).
  • The Map Room Blog notes an interactive map-related play still showing at the Halifax Fringe, Cartography.
  • The NYR Daily notes a high-profile corruption trial of a former government minister in Moscow.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Paul Schenk’s story about how he interned at JPL in 1979 for the Voyager 2 flyby.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the search by a Brazilian man for caves in the south of that country.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy asks some interesting questions about the mechanics of Settlers of Catan.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi remembers Jerry Pournelle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is strongly opposed to any Circassian return to their ancestral homeland.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence’s introduction into our civilization to be managed.
  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.
  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.
  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.
  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada’s space future by the Space Advisory Board.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes how the media made a simulation of a third planet at Gliese 832 a discovery of a new Earth-like world.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on a consideration of why schoolchildren are labelled troublemakers.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that 51 Eridani b has been discovered to be a cloudy world, and how.
  • Far Outliers notes how the decline of Temasek (the future Singapore) was followed by the rise of Melaka.
  • Hornet Stories tells of an Orthodox Christian priest in Australia, who, at the funeral of a lesbian, called for gays to be shot.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Catalonia’s parliament approved a referendum on secession.
  • The LRB Blog considers the import of Monte Testaccio, a man-made hill of rubble and waste dating from Roman times.
  • The NYR Daily considers the engaging and engaged pop art of Grayson Perry.
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a lazy afternoon spent drinking New Zealand beer in a Moscow pub.
  • Towleroad notes an upcoming revealing documentary about Grace Jones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Donbas wars, mercenaries are becoming a major, potentially destabilizing force.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the conflict between quantitative data and qualitative stories in politics.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining a potential relationship between stars’ magnetic fields and exoplanets.
  • Hornet Stories links to the Instagram account of Tom Bianchi, still taking photos of Fire Island.
  • Language Hat notes the death of Ognen Cemerski, a Macedonian who went to heroic lengths to translate Moby Dick into his language.
  • Language Log notes an unusual hybrid Sino-Tibetan sign for a restaurant.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is appropriately savage with Hillbilly Elegy (at least of uncritical readings of said).
  • Marginal Revolutions links to a paper noting French cities, unlike British ones, are much more tightly tied to old Roman settlements, away from the sea.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw calls for the return of the Australian $2 bill.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the aftermath of rampant electoral fraud in Angola. What will come next?
  • Drew Rowsome takes a stand against, particularly in the context of Stephen King’s It, the now-common fear of clowns.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Erik Olin Wright’s thinking on possible utopias.
  • Window on Eurasia notes potential contributions of Russophone Belarusians and Ukrainians to the Russophone world, and notes some controversy in Moscow re: widely-observed Muslim holidays at start of the school year.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams shares, from JPL, the schedule for Cassini in its last days of existence. Goodbye, dear probe.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some classic illustrations from a Persian book called Lights of Canopus.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting that gas giants can stabilize debris disks.
  • Far Outliers shares excerpts from the diary of a Japanese soldier fighting in New Guinea in the Second World War.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the real suffering that high rents impose on the poor in American cities.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some nice X-ray maps of New York City subway stations.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares more vintage Voyager photos of the outer solar system: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune …
  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of the marvelous cookies made on the dying Venetian island of Burano.
  • Drew Rowsome considers, at length and with personal references, the differences between “art” and “porn”. NSFW.
  • Understanding Society considers the latest thinking on causal mechanisms in modern sociology.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if non-Russian languages in Russia are attacked out of anxiety over Russian’s own decline, and speculates that if integration of mostly Muslim immigrants goes poorly in Moscow, the city could get locked in sectarian conflict.