A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘social sciences

[META] Six new blogs on the blogroll

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I will be doing the hard work of installing these six blogs on my blogroll later this weekend. For now, suffice it to say that these six blogs, still-extant islands in a blogosphere in a state of transformation, are going to be the last I’ll be adding for some time. It can be hard to keep up with them all.

  • Daily JSTOR is the famed scholarly archive’s blog. This 1 November post, timed for Nanowrimo, sharing some inspiring quotes from writers about writing, is fun.
  • The blog by Lyman Stone, In a State of Migration, has great analyses of demographic issues in the United States and wider world. This recent post, looking at what it would take to–as the alt-right would wish–“make America white” and the enormous costs of this goal, is worth noting.
  • Information is Beautiful, by famed data journalist David McCandless has all sorts of fantastic infographics. I recommend this one, looking at the United Kingdom’s options re: Brexit.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education’s blog Lingua Franca takes a look at language and writing. This recent post, analyzing the complexities and challenges of George Orwell’s thought on freedom of expression, is very good.
  • Noahpinion is the blog of Bloomberg writer Noah Smith. I quite liked this older essay, one noting that cyberpunk’s writers seem to have gotten the future, unlike other writers in other SF subgenres. Does rapid change lead to bad predictions?
  • Salmagundi is a blog by an anonymous gay Kentucky writer touching on the subjects of his life and more. The most recent post is this link to an essay by Bruce Snider, talking about the lack of rural gay poets.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the effort to name, for New Horizons, Kuiper belt world (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility that Ceres might have a residual ocean underneath its surface.
  • D-Brief notes the bizarre supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have been a recurrent supernova for the past sixty years.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues we are already in a dystopia, one of Huxley not of Orwell.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Ezra Miller was advised not to come out by his supposed allies in Hollywood.
  • The LRB Blog notes an interesting exhibit, inspired by poetry and the Stalinist camp system, in London’s Bloomsbury Square.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane tells the old Swiss story of Charlemagne and the snake.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the last days of bullfighting in Tijuana.
  • Mark Simpson considers the state of masculinity in the modern United Kingdom, and calls for some tartiness.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how the Bullet Cluster of galaxies helps prove the existence of dark matter.
  • Understanding Society considers political power in China at the level of the village.
  • Window on Eurasia considers a variety of negative demographic trends for ethnic Russians in Russia, including low fertility and emigration.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that our first confirmed extrasolar visitor has been named, I/U2017 U1.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the dynamics allowing Enceladus to keep its subsurface water ocean.
  • Crooked Timber reacts to the alarming rift opening up between Saudi Arabia and its Shi’ite neighbours, including Lebanon and Iran.
  • D-Brief notes that the New Horizons team planners are seeking a new name for their next target, (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at some of the greeting cards designed for American Greetings by Robert Crumb.
  • Hornet Stories notes the rise of explicitly homophobic and transphobic ideologues in Paraguay, and its implications for wider South America.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes growing Democratic strength in Washington State.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a New York Times map of the Virginia election for governor.
  • The NYR Daily looks how the brutally quick shutdown of DNAInfo and the Gothamist network reflects the generally parlous state of journalism (among other things).
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the humble momo, a breakfast food in (among other places) Bhutan.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why quark fusion can never be a potent energy source.
  • Understanding Society celebrates its tenth anniversary.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the disinterest of most Russians in personally costly revolutionary actions.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum takes an extended look at sexual harassment in anthropology, drawing from #metoo.
  • Crooked Timber considers the so-called Amazon-Facebook-Google “trinet” set to take over from the free Internet.
  • Dead Things considers if the Americas could have been populated by early migration down the coast, the “kelp route”.
  • Samuel Hatmaker’s Lego portrait of RuPaul is profiled in Hornet Stories.
  • Language Hat considers an untranslatable poem of Pasternak.
  • Language Log notes how Manafort’s legal team confused “Cyprus” with “cypress”.
  • Robert Farley of Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview of his with the Indian consul-general in Houston on the nature of the latter’s work.
  • Tyler Cowen of Marginal Revolution argues blaming Facebook for electoral manipulation overlooks the responsibility of individual voters.
  • The NYR Daily notes that the Kurds have paid the price for Trump’s dealings with Iran.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the surprisingly living Central Cemetery of Vienna.
  • Drew Rowsome explores the literature of horror writer Robert Sherman.
  • Towleroad notes BPM, the Oscar-contending French film about the AIDS crisis in that country.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the oddness of a pledge by China to fight illegal migration by Chinese into Russia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Anthrodendum shares an essay by Yana Stainova talking about restoring a sense of enchantment to ethnography.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at NGTS-1b, a hot Jupiter unusually orbiting a red dwarf star, as does Centauri Dreams.
  • D-Brief looks at how the relativistic jets of matter issuing from central black holes in active galaxies work.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming revival of Boys in the Band by Ryan Murphy, with Zachary Quinto and Matt Bomer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that 28% of those polled worldwide would favour recriminalizing homosexuality.
  • Language Hat looks at the role played by Italian dialect in games of bocce.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study examining some of the structural economic failings of socialism in Yugoslavia.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if there should be a place where people can make use of perfectly good abandoned data sets.
  • Understanding Society looks at the yawning gap between social science theories and actual policies.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how above-average immigrant fertility helps keep birth rates up in Moscow.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlyn Kelly talks about the rejuvenating effects of “forest bathing”. I quite agree, myself.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the idea of Project Blue, a dedicated astronomy satellite to look for exoplanets at Alpha Centauri.
  • D-Brief notes that astrophysicists have verified an eclipse described in the Bible circa 1207 BCE.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to another KIC 8462852 study, finding its dimming is best explained by circumstellar debris.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the importance of being careful with the use of numbers.
  • Far Outliers explores how Singapore managed to position itself as a safe destination for tourists visiting Asia.
  • Language Hat links to a beautiful passage from Kim Stanley Robinson’s Aurora on the messiness of language.
  • Language Log takes a look at the phenomenon of headlessness in the propaganda of North Korea.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the sad short life of Stanwix Melville.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares multiple images, with multiple perspectives, of Giordano Bruno crater on the Moon.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw finds the use of Section 44 of the Australian Constitution to disqualify politicians as dual nationals ridiculous.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of Saint-Tropez.
  • Arnold Zwicky meditates on language, moving from the strange names of the parts of flowers to the X-Men.