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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘japan

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how variable gravity is on irregular asteroid Bennu.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on how the European Southern Observatory has charted the Magellanic Clouds in unprecedented detail.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links looking at the Precambrian Earth.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the late 1950s race to send probes to the Moon.
  • Gizmodo shares some stunning astronomy photos.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the saltwater roads, the routes that slaves in Florida used to escape to the free Bahamas.
  • Language Log looks at some examples of bad English from Japan. How did they come about?
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money rejects the idea of honouring people like Condoleezza Rice.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the idea of free will in light of neurology.
  • Corey S Powell at Out There interviews James Lovelock on his new book Novacene, in which Lovelock imagines the future world and Gaia taken over by AI.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the water shortages faced by downstream countries in Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Ryan Anderson at anthro{dendum} looks at the unnatural history of the beach in California, here.
  • Architectuul looks at the architectural imaginings of Iraqi Shero Bahradar, here.
  • Bad Astronomy looks at gas-rich galaxy NGC 3242.
  • James Bow announces his new novel The Night Girl, an urban fantasy set in an alternate Toronto with an author panel discussion scheduled for the Lillian H. Smith Library on the 28th.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the indirect evidence for an exomoon orbiting WASP-49b, a possible Io analogue detected through its ejected sodium.
  • Crooked Timber considers the plight of holders of foreign passports in the UK after Brexit.
  • The Crux notes that astronomers are still debating the nature of galaxy GC1052-DF2, oddly lacking in dark matter.
  • D-Brief notes how, in different scientific fields, the deaths of prominent scientists can help progress.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how NASA and the ESA are considering sample-return missions to Ceres.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the first test flights of the NASA Mercury program.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at how Japan is considering building ASAT weapons.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the first test flights of the NASA Mercury program.
  • Far Outliers looks how the anti-malarial drug quinine played a key role in allowing Europeans to survive Africa.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox considers grace and climate change.
  • io9 reports on how Jonathan Frakes had anxiety attacks over his return as Riker on Star Trek: Picard.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the threatened banana.
  • Language Log looks at the language of Hong Kong protesters.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how a new version of The Last of the Mohicans perpetuates Native American erasure.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how East Germany remains alienated.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the participant-observer effect in fMRI subjects.
  • The NYR Daily reports on a documentary looking at the India of Modi.
  • Corey S. Powell writes at Out There about Neptune.
  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the atmosphere of Venus, something almost literally oceanic in its nature.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money considers how Greenland might be incorporated into the United States.
  • Rocky Planet notes how Earth is unique down to the level of its component minerals.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog considers biopolitical conservatism in Poland and Russia.
  • Starts With a Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if LIGO has made a detection that might reveal the nonexistence of the theorized mass gap between neutron stars and black holes.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at Marchetti’s constant: People in cities, it seems, simply do not want to commute for a time longer than half an hour.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at how the US Chemical Safety Board works.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on how Muslims in the Russian Far North fare.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at cannons and canons.

[PHOTO] “May the way forward be clear.”

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Yesterday at Yonge-Dundas Square, just across from its flagship store in the Atrium on Bay, MUJI Canada was sponsoring an event, encouraging passers-by to create an ema bearing their wishes for the future. Why not, I thought?

"May the way forward be clear." #toronto #yongeanddundas #yongedundassquare #mujicanada #mujiwellwishes #ema #wood #marker

Written by Randy McDonald

August 30, 2019 at 1:45 pm

[MUSIC] Five music links: Rouge, David Bowie, Taylor Swift, Dixie Chicks, maps

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  • Dangerous Minds looks/u> at obscure 1970s glam punk band Rouge, from Japan.
  • Dangerous Minds points readers to the excellent David Bowie fan comic, the biographical “The Side Effects of the Cocaine”.
  • Taylor Swift made a wonderful donation to the Regent Park School of Music.
  • I do agree with Anne T. Donahue at CBC Arts Mthat country music needs more of the innovative challenges brought by the Dixie Chicks.
  • CityLab shares a playlist of songs dealing, in one way or another, with maps.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • The Buzz shares a TIFF reading list, here.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the growing sensitivity of radial velocity techniques in finding weird exoplanet HR 5183 b, here.
  • The Crux reports on circumgalactic gas and the death of galaxies.
  • Dead Things notes the import of the discovery of the oldest known Australopithecine skull.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on pioneering 1930s queer artist Hannah Gluckstein, also known as Gluck.
  • Gizmodo notes that, for an unnamed reason, DARPA needs a large secure underground testing facility for tomorrow.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Jim Crow laws affected Mexican immigrants in the early 20th century US.
  • Language Hat looks at a new project to study Irish texts and language over centuries.
  • Language Log shares some Chinglish signs from a top university in China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview with Jeffrey Melnick suggesting Charles Manson was substantially a convenient boogeyman.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper suggesting marijuana legalization is linked to declining crime rates.
  • Susan Neiman at the NYR Daily tells how she began her life as a white woman in Atlanta and is ending it as a Jewish woman in Berlin.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at Hayabusa2 at Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel celebrated the 230th anniversary of Enceladus, the Saturn moon that might harbour life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how global warming is harming the rivers of Siberia, causing many to run short.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Zellers, Dufferin Mall, Toronto Islands, Japan, Guild Park

  • Narcity notes the sad news that the last Zellers stores in Canada, including the one in Etobicoke, will be closed by January 2020.
  • Tanya Mok at blogTO looks at the successes of the Dufferin Mall.
  • blogTO looks at the William Meany Maze on the Toronto Islands.
  • Jamie Bradburn writes of the early history of Japanese restaurants in Toronto.
  • Melanie Zettler at Global News writes about the history of the Guild Park and Gardens, in Scarborough.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthro{dendum} features an essay examining trauma and resiliency as encountered in ethnographic fieldwork.
  • Architectuul highlights a new project seeking to promote historic churches built in the United Kingdom in the 20th century.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait examines Ahuna Mons, a muddy and icy volcano on Ceres, and looks at the nebula Westerhout 40.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the recent mass release of data from a SETI project, and notes the discovery of two vaguely Earth-like worlds orbiting the very dim Teegarden’s Star, just 12 light-years away.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes that having universities as a safe space for trans people does not infringe upon academic freedom.
  • The Crux looks at the phenomenon of microsleep.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the Milky Way Galaxy was warped a billion years ago by a collision with dark matter-heavy dwarf galaxy Antlia 2, and notes a robotic fish powered by a blood analogue.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that India plans on building its own space station.
  • Earther notes the recording of the song of the endangered North Pacific right whale.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the role of emotional labour in leisure activities.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Japan prepared for the Battle of the Leyte Gulf in 1944.
  • Gizmodo looks at astronomers’ analysis of B14-65666, an ancient galactic collision thirteen billion light-years away, and notes that the European Space Agency has a planned comet interception mission.
  • io9 notes how the plan for Star Trek in the near future is to not only have more Star Trek, but to have many different kinds of Star Trek for different audiences.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the observation of Pete Buttigieg that the US has probably already had a gay president.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the many ways in which the rhetoric of Celtic identity has been used, and notes that the archerfish uses water ejected from its eyes to hunt.
  • Language Hat looks at why Chinese is such a hard language to learn for second-language learners, and looks at the Suso monastery in Spain, which played a key role in the coalescence of the Spanish language.
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of katakana.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the death of deposed Egypt president Mohammed Morsi looks like a slow-motion assassination, and notes collapse of industrial jobs in the Ohio town of Lordstown, as indicative of broader trends.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the death of Mohamed Morsi.
  • The Map Rom Blog shares a new British Antarctic Survey map of Greenland and the European Arctic.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how non-religious people are becoming much more common in the Middle East, and makes the point that the laying of cable for the transatlantic telegraph is noteworthy technologically.
  • Noah Smith at Noahpionion takes the idea of the Middle East going through its own version of the Thirty Years War seriously. What does this imply?
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at a Lebanon balanced somehow on the edge, and looks at the concentration camp system of the United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains what people should expect from LightSail 2, noting that the LightSail 2 has launched.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw points readers to his stories on Australian spy Harry Freame.
  • Rocky Planet explains, in the year of the Apollo 50th anniversary, why the Moon matters.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews, and praises, South African film Kanarie, a gay romp in the apartheid era.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper examining the relationship between childcare and fertility in Belgium, and looks at the nature of statistical data from Turkmenistan.
  • The Strange Maps Blog shares a map highlighting different famous people in the United States.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why different galaxies have different amounts of dark matter, and shares proof that the Apollo moon landings actually did happen.
  • Towleroad notes the new evidence that poppers, in fact, are not addictive.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the parlous state of the Volga River.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes an extended look at the mid-20th century gay poet Frank O’Hara.