A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘cold war

[AH] Five #alternatehistory maps from r/imaginarymaps: Germany, Britain, Africa, Japan, Iran

  • r/imaginarymaps imagines a Germany united along religious lines, Protestant areas falling under Prussia and Catholic ones under Austria.
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps imagines a republican Great Britain. When could republicanism have taken off in the British Isles as a whole?
  • Reddit’s imaginarymaps shares a map of a former Portuguese colony of Zambezia, a Lusophone nation stretching from the Atlantic at Namibia east through to Mozambique.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map, imagining a Japan (and northeast Asia generally) split into sheres of influence by rival European powers, treaty ports and all, surely describes a worst-case scenario for 19th century Japan. How likely was this?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines an Iran that, following a 9/11-style attack by Lebanese terrorists in Moscow, ends up partitioned between Soviet and US-Arab spheres of influence.

[AH] Five #alternatehistory maps from r/imaginarymaps: France, Austria, Slovenia, Japanese Empire

  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines an early medieval France that became not a notional kingdom but rather a decentralized empire, a Holy Roman Empire of the French Nation.
  • This r/imaginarymaps map imagines a greater Austria that includes Slovenia.
  • A Greater Slovenia, encompassing lands from Austria, Italy, and even Hungary, is the subject of this r/imaginarymaps map.
  • Could an Austria divided in the Cold War be divided like this r/imaginarymaps map?
  • This r/imaginarymaps map shows a Japanese Empire that survived until 1956, encompassing much of the Russian Far East as well as Manchuria and Korea.

[AH] Five alternate history maps from r/imaginarymaps (#alternatehistory)

Reddit’s imaginarymaps forum has a lot of great alternate history maps.

  • This r/imaginarymaps map depicts a Dutch Formosa crica 1900.
  • This creation imagines a joint German-Polish invasion of the Soviet Union.
  • this map imagines a different Cold War, with a largely Communist Germany opposed by a Franco-British Union.
  • This map of an alternate Cold War circa 1960 that actually made it into a history book as our timeline
  • This map shows the remarkably fragmented Central America of Marvel Comics’s famous Earth-616.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: gay and Catholic, 1970s Moscow, Australia beaches, Paradise Garage, bars

  • The Conversation notes the dangers facing LGBTQ students and staff in Catholic schools in Canada.
  • Deutsche Welle shares the story of how the Soviet Union in the 1970s hosted a delegation of visiting gay activists from Berlin.
  • The Guardian reports on how LGBTQ people in Australia have found it difficult, even unsafe, to enjoy that country’s beach culture.
  • VICE shares photos from New York City’s Paradise Garage, taken in the 1970s.
  • Hornet Stories takes an extended look at the reasons, good and bad, for the decline of gay bars.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares a photo taken by the H-ATLAS satellite of deep space, a sea of pale dusty dots each one a galaxy.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares, in photos and in prose, 11 views of New York City. (What a fantastic metropolis!)
  • Centauri Dreams hosts an essay from Alex Tolley suggesting that most life in the universe is lithophilic, living in the stable warm interiors of planets.
  • Cody Delistraty links to an essay of his looking at the tensions, creative and personal, between Renoir father and son.
  • Gizmodo links to a paper suggesting the mysterious ASASSN-14li event can be explained by a star falling into a supermassive galactic black hole, the analysis suggesting the black hole was rotating at half the speed of light.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the mysterious dancing plagues of medieval Europe.
  • The LRB Blog looks at casual anti-Semitism in British sports.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that the legacies of Confucian state-building in China may have depressed long-term economic growth in particularly Confucian areas.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the success of the Chang’e-4 probe, complete with photos and videos sent from the far side of the Moon.
  • Roads to Kingdoms shares the photography of a changing Vietnam by Simone Sapienza.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the ongoing Toronto comedy show Unsafe Space, and enjoys it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the achievements of the TESS planet-hunting satellites, looking for nearby planets, emphasizing its achievements in the Pi Mensae system.
  • Window on Eurasia considers a fascinating alternate history. Could Beria, had he survived Stalin, have overseen a radical liberalization of the Soviet Union in the early Cold War?

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Ryan Anderson at Anthrodendum takes a look at how the threat posed to coastal properties by sea level rise reveals much about how human beings assign value.
  • A BCer in Toronto’s Jeff Jedras writes about the food at a Newfoundlander party in Ottawa.
  • D-Brief considers how past ice ages might have been caused by the shifting poles.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the work of Michelle Pannor Silver, looking at how retirement can influence the identities of individuals.
  • Far Outliers notes that, in its first major wars, Japan treated prisoners of war well.
  • JSTOR Daily examines a paper that takes a look at how the X-Men have achieved such resonance in pop culture, such power as symbols of minorities’ persecution and survival.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of the effusive press coverage of Mitt Romney, new Republican senator.
  • Geoffrey Pullum at Lingua Franca shares, for other English speakers, a lexicon of specialized words from the United Kingdom regarding Brexit.
  • At the LRB Blog, Hyo Yoon Kang takes a look at a series of legal hearings investigating the possibility of assigning legal responsibility for global warming to “carbon majors” like big oil.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution shares his argument that the history of the 21st century United States might look like that of the 19th century, with progress despite political disarray.
  • The NYR Daily shares the arguments of scholar of populism, Jan-Werner Müller, looking at what Cold War liberalism has to say now.
  • Peter Rukavina shares the story of his two visits to relatives around the Croatian city of Kutina, with photos.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how astronomers solved the mystery of the “Zone of Avoidance”, the portions of space blotted out by the dense plane of our galaxy.
  • Window on Eurasia reports from a conference on minority languages where speakers complain about Russian government pressures against their languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at tea, starting with tea-time aphorisms and going further afield.

[MUSIC] Five music links: The Music Man, Raine Maida, David Bowie, 70s, Erland Cooper

  • JSTOR Daily reports on how the 1962 movie The Music Man, based on the earlier musical, became a major Cold War export of the US even as small-town America was changing.
  • This Global News interview with Raine Maida, lead singer of Our Lady Peace, makes me positive-nostalgic for the 1990s.
  • NPR reported on the discovery of David Bowie’s first demo, from 1963, some time ago, but this still amazes me.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox took a look at the 1970s song “Hot Child in the City”.
  • The Island Review interviewed multi-instrumentalist Erland Cooper and shared some of his music, inspired by the culture and the sound of the Orkneys.